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Wed, 07/28/2010 08:00 PM Injured man   0.0  Louisville KY 
 USA 
  working on air conditioning system in house  N/A  Ground Strike,Indirect,Indoors,Plumbing,Work 
Business:Location: Auto Dealers Auto Repair Bar Carpet Cleaning Child Care Chocolate Coffee Dentist Doctor Florists Furniture Golf Course Gym Hair Salon Hotels Insurance Jewelry Landscaping Locksmith Movers Pizza Plumbing Realtor Remodeling Storage Browse all » by MojoPages Local News Share this article: Email this article Digg this! Save to Delicious Post to Facebook Share on Twitter Print print Many homes, one man struck by lightning by Melanie Kahn WHAS11.com Posted on July 28, 2010 at 11:48 PM LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WHAS11) -- Officials say a man who was struck by lightning is at University Hospital Wednesday night. This is the third person to be hit by lightning in the past two days. Hundreds of lightning strikes hit the ground within minutes, several striking homes in eastern Jefferson County and at least one person. Firefighters tell us an Accu-Temp mechanic was working on an air conditioning unit inside a home on Beechlawn Court off Six Mile Lane during the storm. Michelle King, the homeowner, said "At some point he went back outside and then my husband heard a pop, and then we found him on the ground and called 911." Officials tell us the man was rushed to University Hospital, but the extent of injuries are unknown. This may seem like a freak accident, but this wasn't the only incident with lightning. Captain Dewayne McCrey with the Eastwood Fire Department says they got at least six calls to homes that were struck by lightning. He says "Pretty much every storm that comes through we'll get at least two alarms sounding. Today was unusual, six within 15 to 20 minutes, but the storm was pretty intense as far as lighting goes." Firefighters say the best way you can protect yourself is to stay indoors during thunderstorms, and the best way to protect your home is to install lightning rods on your home.
Tue, 07/27/2010 03:00 PM Killed Carmela Kirkland, cadet 2 of 2  18.0  Fort Knox KY 
 USA 
    N/A  Cardiac Arrest,Delayed Death,During the storm,Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Two female cadets hurt in lightning strike at Ft. Knox Posted: Jul 27, 2010 9:25 PM Updated: Jul 27, 2010 11:45 PM By Heather Smith - email FORT KNOX, KY (WAVE)  Two Army cadets undergoing training at are being treated for injuries after a lightning strike at Fort Knox. According to Anne Torphy, the public affairs officer for Fort Knox, the incident involved two female cadets happened around 3 p.m. on July 27 near the Muldraugh area of the post. Torphy said one cadet was struck by lightning. She was initially given medical attention at the scene and taken to Ireland Army Hospital on the post before being taken by air ambulance to University Hospital in Louisville. Torphy said she is currently listed in critical condition. The second cadet injured was standing nearby the first, but was not directly struck by the lightning. That cadet was also given medical treatment at the scene and is listed as stable at Ireland Army Hospital. The names of the cadets and their hometowns have not been released. Fort Knox cadet struck by lightning Posted: Jul 28, 2010 2:52 PM Most Popular Stories Fox 41 tapes played for jurors in Sypher trial Sypher trial Day 2 19-year-old Bullitt Co. woman missing Body found at Floyds Fork Park identified Key witness takes stand in Sypher case Missing teenager profiled on AMW web site Free school uniforms and clothes Attorney says daycare worker is innocent FOX41 Archive: Man who hoped to start new life becomes Louisville's latest murder victim Sypher trial Day 1 A cadet at Fort Knox remains in the hospital Wednesday after being struck by lightning. It happened Tuesday afternoon just after a training exercise was stopped because of a pop-up storm. The cadet was taken to Ireland Army Hospital on the post. Her injuries were so severe she was then flown by air ambulance to U of L Hospital's Trauma Center. Her condition is not being released. In a news release, Col. David Hubner Sr., commander of the Leader's Training Course, says, "Our thoughts and prayers are with the cadet and her family." The Leader's Training Course is designed to let college students who have not been through ROTC qualify for the advanced senior ROTC program. It's also designed to give them a glimpse of Army life. The current course ends August 7th. 1,400 men and women are going through that course. ROTC cadet dies of lightning strike in Kentucky Associated Press - July 30, 2010 8:54 PM ET LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - An 18-year-old ROTC cadet from Alabama has died in Louisville after being struck by lightning at Fort Knox. Deputy coroner Jim Wesley said Friday night that Carmela Kirkland of Dothan, Ala., died Friday at University Hospital in Louisville. She was struck by lightning Tuesday afternoon while doing field exercises at Fort Knox. Wesley said Kirkland was with fellow cadets at the post. Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Tue, 07/27/2010 09:00 PM Injured Austin Schindler  16.0  Duluth MN 
 USA 
  out for a run, taking video on cell phone  N/A  Cell Phone,During the storm,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Austin Shinler, 16, of Harris, Minn., sits on the rock at Bardons Peak where he was struck by lightning Tuesday evening. Shinler is holding his nearly new shoes that were ripped apart by the lightning. (Clint Austin / caustin@duluthnews.com) Austin Shinler started running a only month ago, so on Tuesday when he ran four miles from his grandfathers cabin near Spirit Mountain to Bardons Peak on West Skyline Parkway, the 16-year-old realized he didnt have the energy to run back. His cousin, who was riding his bike with Shinler, went to get their grandfather. Then the lightning started. The Harris, Minn., resident and North Branch High School junior said to avoid getting struck he moved from a high point of rocks on the peak and sat on a lower rock to wait for his grandfather. But he probably should have stayed where he was. After hearing a loud noise, the next thing Shinler said he remembered was waking up and asking where he was and what happened to him. Bystanders told him hed been hit by lightning and knocked unconscious. He was taken to St. Lukes hospital, where he was treated for third-degree burns on his right ankle and second-degree burns down the backs of his legs. The lightning bolt didnt hit him directly, but instead about 10 feet in front of him. The doctor told me that the lightning must have gone through the rock, up through my legs and out my feet, Shinler said. Part of his right shoe has been torn apart, while his ankle has been heavily bandaged to treat the burn. The worst pain, he said, came when he first woke up. It felt like somebody took a frying pan and hit me on the head as hard they could, he said. And that lasted about 30 seconds. People parked nearby to enjoy the view of the peak helped Shinler by getting him blankets and calling 911. When his cousin, Robert Walters, returned, he found Shinler covered in blankets, shivering from the cold, and pale white. He told me, Please dont die,  Shinler said. But Shinler said he was able to joke with others. I told [one of the onlookers]: At least we have a great view,  he said. His parents drove the two hours from Harris to be with him. At first they were told he had collapsed after running; later on the drive they were told he had been hit by lightning. Hes very, very lucky, said his mother, Shellie. But I dont think its quite hit me yet. I still feel like this inside, she said as she held up her shaking hands. Shinlers parents said the doctors told them he shouldnt have any problems with memory loss and that heart problems detected Tuesday night were absent by Wednesday. And Shinler has a sense of humor about the incident. His father, Doug, used his cell phone all day Wednesday to talk with family and friends, but because he forgot to bring the charger the battery was just about dead. Dont worry dad, Austin Shinler told him. Just give it to me and Ill charge it up for you. Harris teen survives lightning strike Wednesday, 04 August 2010 By Jon Tatting It was suppose to be a fun yet ordinary, weeklong getaway at Grandpas cabin near Spirit Mountain in Duluth. But Mother Nature had other plans for one visiting teenager from Harris. Austin Shinler, 16, had just finished a 4-mile jog, with cousin Robby on bicycle, along West Skyline Parkway, near Bardons Peak, around 5 p.m. Tuesday, July 27. Exhausted, Austin used his younger cousins cell phone to call grandpa for a ride. Robby continued back to the cabin. As he waited, a storm was swelling with lightning and rain, creating quite a show for Austin and a few others who were inside their parked cars at the scenic overlook. He captured some video with his iPod before finding a nice sized rock to sit on until grandpa arrived. Austin doesnt remember what followed, except for a young woman asking if he was alright and needed an ambulance. He was dazed and confused, not knowing what happened or where he was. He was white as a sheet as later described by his grandfather. He had whiplash and lacerations on the back of his head from tipping backward onto the rock. He had second and third degree burns. Austin had been struck by lightning. Austin received second degree burns on his right thigh, behind the leg, where doctors believe the lightning charge entered. His worst injury was more second degree burning and a gash on his right ankle, where the charge likely exited. When the ambulance arrived, he and the young woman were then accompanied by others who had been parked at the overlook. He was transported by ambulance to St. Lukes Hospital in Duluth, where he was hospitalized in stable condition. The part that scared me the most was that I couldnt feel my legs, feet or toes, recalled Austin during an interview with his mother, Shellie, at their home last week. Later, he had to ask a nurse if his toes were wiggling. Just barely, she replied. Once at the hospital, Austin was hooked up to a heart monitor and received a CT scan. Medical staff also removed his neck brace, which had been placed at the scene. All the staff talked about how lucky I was. They said I was the first lightning strike victim of the year, explained Austin, noting the hospital said it treats two to three lightning cases a year. Still, Austin received second degree burns on his right thigh, behind the leg, where doctors believe the lightning charge entered. His worst injury was more second degree burning and a gash on his right ankle, where the charge likely exited. Austin will likely save his sock and shoe, which were blown out and ripped apart from the strike. His back was also peppered with smaller first degree burns. As of late last week, he was still in recovery. Doctors orders called for him to elevate and ice his right ankle, which is bandaged as well as his thigh. What are the odds? According to the National Weather Service, only about 10 percent of people who are struck by lightning are killed, leaving 90 percent with no effects or various degrees of disability. In light of the odds of becoming a lightning victim, the estimated number of actual injuries is 540 compared to 60 estimated deaths of the approximate 300,000,000 people who populate the United States. Other statistics include: " The odds of being struck by lightning in a given year is one in 500,000. " The odds of being struck in your lifetime (estimated 80 years) is one in 6,250. " The odds you will be affected by someone being struck (10 people affected for every one struck) is one in 625. The strike, a sense of humor Austin said a witness to his lightning strike reported he was struck by one of the many branches of the main bolt that hit the ground just a few feet away. When struck, he allegedly sat up for a second before slouching back onto the rock. He was out for just a second before waking to a daze. Yet his sense of humor was intact, even upon coming to. What a view, he told those who gathered around him. That night at the hospital, Austin couldnt resist broadcasting his experience on Facebook: Just got hit by lightning in Duluth. Im OK. Got second degree burns on ankle and thigh. Hurts to walk, but should be home by tomorrow. One can imagine the responses he got soon after typing the message. In fact, a number of girlsunknown to Austinrequested to be friends. But he quietly declined, as approved by Mom. Austin has also enjoyed his 15 minutes of fame, as several media groupsfrom the main broadcast stations to area newspapershave already covered his story. I felt popular, he said of all of the publicity. And his story is one that will likely be retold for days to come, especially when he enters his junior year this fall at North Branch Area High School, and over his lifetime. He already knows he will be revisiting the lightning site, like a personal monument, for years to come. Moms reaction Back at home in the Harris area, Shellie said she and husband Doug were getting their vehicles air conditioning fixed when her mother called with the news that Austin was hurt and being taken by ambulance. As soon as they could, Mom and Dad were off to Duluth, hitting sections of bad weather along the way. And thanks to cell phone technology, they were kept updated on Austins condition and learned about the lightning strike. When we got there (St. Lukes), his condition was improving, recalled Shellie. Except they didnt like his EKG results, so they kept him overnight. Electrocardiogram (EKG) tests help doctors identify and diagnose any heart abnormalities, which can occur in lightning strike cases. In a follow-up EKG test the next morning, Austins results were fine. When asked to comment on her sons unlikely experience, Shellie is still in disbelief yet turns to God as a reason for his survival. It seems like a dream I should wake up from, she said. It doesnt seem real to me yet. I think God is not finished with him, and its not his time yet. God is saying hes got more work to do. We (family and friends) have been doing a lot of praying for him. Lightning: what you need to know According to the National Weather Service, there is no place outside that is safe when thunderstorms are in the area. In addition... " If you hear thunder, lightning is close enough to strike you. " When you hear thunder, immediately move to safe shelter. Safe shelter is a substantial building or inside an enclosed, metal-topped vehicle. " Stay in safe shelter at least 30 minutes after you hear the last clap of thunder. Indoor lightning safety tips: " Stay off corded phones, computers and other electrical equipment that put you in direct contact with electricity. " Avoid plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. " Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches. " Do not lie on concrete floors, and do not lean against concrete walls. If you are caught outside with no safe shelter anywhere nearby, the following actions may reduce your risk: " Immediately get off elevated areas such as hills, mountain ridges or peaks. " Never lie flat on the ground. " Never use a tree for shelter. " Never use a cliff or rocky overhang for shelter. " Immediately get out and away from ponds, lakes and other bodies of water. " Stay away from objects that conduct electricity (barbed wire fences, power lines, windmills, etc.) " Under no circumstances should any of the above actions be taken if a building or an all-metal vehicle is nearby. If someone is struck: " Victims do not carry an electrical charge and may need immediate medical attention. " Monitor the victim and begin CPR or AED, if necessary. " Call 9-1-1 for help.
Tue, 07/27/2010 03:00 PM Injured female cadet 1 of 2  0.0  Fort Knox KY 
 USA 
    N/A  During the storm,Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
2 Fort Knox soldiers sent to hospital after lightning strike Posted: Jul 27, 2010 10:03 PM Updated: Jul 27, 2010 10:03 PM By Christina Stymfal - email FORT KNOX, KY (KOLD) - Two female cadets were involved in an incident on post today at around 3:00 p.m., according to Fort Knox spokeswoman Officer Anne Torphy. The first female cadet was struck by lightning on post in the Muldraugh area. She was given medical attention and then transported to Ireland Army Hospital. The cadet was then transferred to UL Hospital via air ambulance and is in critical condition according to Ft. Knox PAO. The second female cadet who was near the first cadet that was struck, was also injured from the lightning. Even though, she was not struck, the cadet was so close to the one that was struck that she was hurt as well. The second cadet was also given medical attention at the scene. She was transported to Ireland Army Hospital and is in stable condition. No other information is being released at this time until families have been notified. By BOB WHITE bwhite@thenewsenterprise.com An out-of-state college student was in critical condition Wednesday at University Hospital in Louisville where shes being treated for injuries caused Tuesday by lightning that struck a group of trainees on Fort Knox. Forrest Berkshire, a public affairs specialist with Fort Knoxs Leaders Training Course, said a group of prospective Reserve Officers Training Corps cadets were practicing squad tactics in a wooded area near West Point when foul weather popped up, forcing a halt to training at around 3 p.m. Tuesday. As the trainees hustled toward a safe area sheltered from the storm, lightning struck one of the trainees. The female trainee suffered life-threatening injuries and was taken from the scene to Ireland Army Community Hospital, according to Berkshire. Afterward, she was flown to University Hospital in Louisville. Berkshire said she was listed in critical condition Wednesday afternoon. The trainees age, name and hometown had not been released as of Wednesday afternoon. A second trainee who incurred non-physical injuries, according to Berkshire, also was taken to Ireland Hospital for treatment after lightning hit the trainee. Specifics on that students condition were unavailable, but Berkshire said the student should be released from Ireland Hospital soon. Both trainees were participating in the Leaders Training Course. LTC is a program which, for the past 45 years, has offered mid-level college students considering ROTC and life as a military officer a chance to catch up on time lost while not participating in ROTC their freshman and sophomore years. Fort Knox takes precautions to keep trainees safe, Berkshire said. Among those precautions is Fort Knoxs Weather Operations, which employs six meteorology experts. Site manager Mark Adams said Tuesdays weather was extreme with more than 200 lightning strikes identified within a 25-mile radius of the post airport within 15 minutes. The lightning detector resets on 15-minute intervals, according to Adams. One bolt struck an antenna on top of Radcliff police headquarters, causing upsets for inter-agency communications, according to Radcliff spokesman Bryce Shumate. The city recently finished repairs to a larger antenna that had been struck by lightning earlier this month. In addition to the high volume of electrical activity Tuesday, Adams said about 1.27 inches of rain fell on post. About 1.4 inches fell during the same timeframe in Rineyville, where Adams gauges rain. Another weather watcher, Adams said, recorded 2.75 inches of rain falling in Elizabethtown. Bob White can be reached at (270) 505-1750.
Mon, 07/26/2010 04:00 PM Injured man on balcony  0.0  Joiner AR 
 USA 
  outside on 2nd floor balcony  N/A  Deck,Ground Strike,Outside 
Police: Lightning strikes man on balcony in Region 8 Posted: Jul 26, 2010 6:28 PM REGION 8 Headlines Police: Lightning strikes man on balcony in Region 8 Region 8 county spending more money on gravel, dirt and sand Region 8 bombing victim to testify at Mann trial McCaskill: Arlington Cemetery grave gaffe growing Region 8 firefighters work with community's youngest residents Two arrested in Jonesboro on drug charges after traffic stop 2 Arkansas sites added to Historic Register Six animals taken from Region 8 home in possible abuse or neglect charges Region 8 man charged with multiple felony drug charges Sexual assault occurs on ASU campus Top News This Hour Arkansas Top News This Hour Here is the latest Missouri news from The Associated Press Tennessee Top News This Hour JOINER, AR (KAIT)  The Joiner Police Chief tells Region 8 News that a man was struck by lightning during severe weather that rolled through Region 8 Monday afternoon. Joiner Police Chief Robert Yerbey said around 4pm a Joiner man was standing outside on his 2nd story balcony, when lightning struck a nearby tree and according to police traveled over to him. Police say the man was transported to the South Mississippi County Regional Medical Center in Osceola. His condition is unknown at this time. ©2010 KAIT all rights reserved.
Mon, 07/26/2010 04:00 PM Injured woman   0.0  Athens Al 
 USA 
    N/A  Outside 
Athens Resident Struck By Lightning Posted: July 26, 2010 05:49 PM Local News more>> 31 Update : Little Joe Spotted in Huntsville Kids To Love School Supply Drive Deadly Lightning Strike in Marshall County US-South Korea Joint Exercises Underway Oil Spill Day 98: BP CEO Heading O-U-T Online Afghan War Document Leak Firefighter Arson Trial Set To Begin Drugs Off The Street, Huntsville Club Closes More Moms Cope With Postpartum Depression Extended Unemployment Benefits Available The Limestone County Emergency Management Agency is reporting a person has been struck by lightning in Athens. It happened around 4:00 at the Oak Leaf Apartments on Elkton Street. Reports from the scene indicate the victim survived and is being transported to Huntsville Hospital for further treatment. WAAY 31's Barry Hiett is on the scene and will have more in live reports tonight at 6:00. LIMESTONE COUNTY, AL (WAFF) - Limestone County EMA officials say a woman is recovering after being struck by lightning. Officials say the strike happened around 3:15 P.M. off of Highway 31 just south of Athens. The woman's name has not been released at this time, but officials do say she was taken to Athens Hospital where she is listed in stable condition.
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:34 PM Injured sister, family 3 of 5  13.0  Lake Guntersville Al 
 USA 
  swimming at campground  N/A  Beach,Camping,Ground Strike,In Water,Outside,Swimming,Water 
Deadly Lightning Strike in Marshall County Posted: July 25, 2010 11:45 PM Local News more>> Firefighter Arson Trial Set To Begin Deadly Lightning Strike in Marshall County Drugs Off The Street, Huntsville Club Closes More Moms Cope With Postpartum Depression Extended Unemployment Benefits Available 2 Men From Albertville Killed in Tower Collapse Decatur Police Seek Burglary Suspect Decatur Man Charged with Car Break-in Marshall County Plant Closing Record Number of Graduates Earn Scholarships A lightning strike on Lake Guntersville killed a teenage girl and sent four others to the hospital. It happened as a family was celebrating a birthday by the beach at Honeycomb Camp Grounds. The victims were less than a hundred yards from shore when the lightning struck. Angela Moore said it sounded like, "You felt a big jolt...just like it jolted the ground, and then we saw family members pulling people out of the water." Once out of the water, former 911 dispatcher Tina Jaggers did everything she could to help. "We laid one down, which was the mom&did compressions...we got her back, rolled her over on her side. Then we went over to the 16-year-old. Me and Mark Cocks. We did CPR on the 16-year-old. Her eyes had rolled back in her head and she had already turned gray, and we didn't get a pulse." Emergency officials say this tragedy proves just how dangerous lightning can be. It's a lesson Marshall County EMA Director, Anita McBurnett hopes everyone takes to heart. "The rule is if you hear thunder, you need to remain indoors for at least 30 minutes afterwards, because lightening can still strike you." According to the National Weather Service, 17 people have been killed by lightning strikes in the United States this year. This is the first death in Alabama. Reporter: Ross Sather rsather@waaytv.com
Sun, 07/25/2010 03:30 PM Killed Carl Henn  0.0  King Farm MD 
 USA 
  standing beneath canopy  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Delayed Death,During the storm,Ground Strike,Hail,Outside,Raining,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
VideoPhoto 'There Was No Warning For This Storm,' - Carl Henn, Man Struck By Lightning in Storm Dies Carl Henn was well known as a community activist Updated: Thursday, 29 Jul 2010, 6:58 AM EDT Published : Wednesday, 28 Jul 2010, 7:33 PM EDT KING FARM, Md. - The death toll from Sunday's severe storm continues to climb. Now a fourth person has died. Carl Henn, a well known community activist in Rockville, was struck by lightning Sunday. Henn had gone to enjoy the fruits of his labor during a picnic at King Farm, where he had helped establish the community garden. Then the storm hit. "There was no warning for this storm," his wife Carol Henn said. "Suddenly this thing is coming in and everyone just fled." Lightning struck a tree, burning the bark, and hitting Henn who was standing beneath the canopy. No one seemed to see the lightning strike. Henn was on the ground unconscious. His wife says a nurse practitioner who happened to come by began CPR and then friends rushed him to the hospital in their SUV, unable to get through to 911. "When they found him he didn't have a pulse. So they immediately began CPR," said Henn's wife. Montgomery County spokesperson Patrick Lacefield said the 911 call center was overwhelmed Sunday, taking in 350 calls between 3:30 and 4:00 p.m., a 1000% increase over a typical 30 minute period. He says it's likely some people calling at that time got a busy signal. Normally Lacefield says, if all the lines are busy, callers will get a voice message saying to stay on the line but if all circuits are jammed, callers would get a busy signal. It's a rare occurrence he says, but it does happen. The county is now looking into what happened, after receiving complaints following Henn's death Tuesday. He was a fixture in the city of Rockville. Some called him the conscience of the community, pushing for a greener world. When it came time for public comment at meetings he was often at the podium. He had run for city Council three times, coming a few votes shy in his last attempt in 2009. "He was known in his community as someone you could go to and he would speak for you. More than once he came to citizen's forum," said Rockville mayor Phyllis Marcuccio who has known him at least 10 years. Rockville's network of community gardens are Henn's legacy. He considered public service the highest order. He was just a nice man. You knew when you saw him or talked to him he had a smile," said Marcuccio. Henn biked everywhere. His wife asked him to drive to the picnic Sunday but he insisted on biking. She wasn't with him when lightning struck but before he passed away, a flicker of life. "I touched his face and talked to him. His eyes opened," Carol Henn said. "I like to think somehow he heard me& I told him I loved him." Victim of D.C. area storm, a local environmentalist, 'lived what he believed' GALLERY Severe storms kill four and cut power to hundreds of thousands (Photos) Severe thunderstorms felled trees and power lines across much of the Washington area Sunday afternoon, killing Four people and leaving hundreds of thousands without power. » LAUNCH PHOTO GALLERY Network News X PROFILE View More Activity TOOLBOX Resize Print E-mail Yahoo! Buzz Reprints COMMENT 10 Comments | View All » POST A COMMENT You must be logged in to leave a comment. Log in | Register Why Do I Have to Log In Again? Discussion Policy WHO'S BLOGGING » Links to this article By Katherine Shaver Washington Post Staff Writer Thursday, July 29, 2010 Seven families who tend the Watkins Pond Community Garden in Rockville gathered Sunday for a picnic and double celebration: to mark their second summer harvest and to thank Carl Henn, the local environmental activist credited with creating their beloved garden. THIS STORY In an instant, party became a nightmare Peace of mind restored to Md. family Storm victim was happily committed to family, community View All Items in This Story When dark clouds blew in without warning about 3:15 p.m., the group ran from the King Farm Park picnic area to its cars. Five minutes into the roaring wind and pelting rain and hail, one picnicgoer said, a bright bolt of lightning filled the sky, followed instantly by deafening thunder. It was only when everyone had emerged after the fast-moving storm passed a few minutes later that they saw Henn lying beneath a towering tree that had a fresh, eight-foot-long gash where lightning had apparently struck, said Dennis McCarthy of Rockville. McCarthy said he and another picnicgoer started CPR on Henn while others frantically called 911 on cellphones, only to hear busy signals. "It was a nice afternoon that just suddenly turned into hell," McCarthy said. Henn, 48, died Tuesday at Washington Hospital Center, where his brother said his heart, damaged by the lightning strike, gave out. His wife, two daughters, parents and three siblings were at his bedside. He became the fourth victim of the severe storm that also killed 6-year-old Eric Lawson when a tree limb fell on him in Sterling; Warren D. Smith, 63, of Annapolis, who was electrocuted on a watercraft from a lightning strike near the Chesapeake Bay Bridge; and Michelle Humanick, 44, of College Park, whose minivan was crushed by a tree. The storm felled trees, snarled traffic and knocked out electricity to more than 300,000 homes and businesses across the Washington region; 29,000 remained without power Wednesday. Friends, neighbors and Rockville officials said Montgomery County lost in Henn one of its most passionate environmental activists. He is credited with expanding the city's community gardens and persuading the City Council in 2007 to save fuel and promote recycling by cutting garbage collection from twice to once a week. "He lived what he believed," McCarthy said. "He rode a bike so he wouldn't pollute. He used a push lawn mower. Everything the man did was principled." Henn ran unsuccessfully for the City Council three times, most recently last year, but friends said he didn't harbor political ambitions as much as a tireless desire to help. When plows left six-foot mounds of snow in his Rockville neighborhood last winter, Henn grabbed his pickax and persuaded neighbors to join him in clearing the sidewalks. He was president of the Hungerford Civic Association. "He was just constantly trying to do things to make the community better," said Art Stigile, a neighbor who worked with Henn as the civic association's vice president. Henn worked at the National Institutes of Health for 20 years and spent the past 11 in procurement, an NIH spokesman said. But friends said his family and environmental causes were what consumed him. He was a fixture at City Council meetings, urging leaders to forgo road construction in favor of improving paths for cyclists and pedestrians and to pursue fuel sources beyond petroleum. Friends said his dry wit kept his message more lighthearted than preachy. Henn was known for riding his bike to work and wherever he could. He had ridden two miles to the picnic Sunday, McCarthy said, and everyone assumed he had run to someone's car for shelter. "It physically pained him when he had to use his car," said his younger brother, Kenna Henn of Austin. Burt Hall, Rockville's recreation and parks director, said Henn had urged the city to add more community gardens so residents could walk or ride bikes to their plots. He helped officials identify public land for potential planting and organized nearby residents to get the gardens approved and set up, Hall said, and he helped establish three community gardens -- two in King Farm and one in Fallsgrove -- in the past seven years. "We wouldn't have these additional gardens without Carl's leadership," Hall said. Henn is survived by his wife, Carol, and two daughters, Jessica, 21, and Allison, 16.
Sun, 07/25/2010 06:04 PM Injured woman   0.0  Sandwich MA  
 USA 
  in her basement  N/A  Basement,Ground Strike,Indirect,Indoors 
Woman hurt in lightning strike at Sandwich home Text Size: A | A | A Print this Article Email this Article ShareThis July 25, 2010 SANDWICH  A woman was injured last night when she was jolted by an electrical surge during a lightning strike, a fire department official said. The Land's End Lane resident was in her basement at 6:04 p.m. when lightning struck a nearby tree and transformer, sending an underground charge into her home, the fire official said. The woman complained about a mild electrical surge, but she was not taken to the hospital for treatment. A neighboring house, which was unoccupied at the time, sustained minor damage when the lightning strike fried the home's circuit panel, the fire official said. There were no other injuries or damage reported.
Sun, 07/25/2010 12:00 PM Killed 4 killed 14 injured  0.0  Cuttack  
 Orissa 
       
Lightning, accident kill eight in rain-hit Orissa Bhubaneswar, July 25  Four people were killed when the bus they were travelling in was swept away in floodwaters in Orissas Rayagada district while four more died after being struck by lightning in Cuttack city, officials said Sunday. The driver lost control while the bus was passing over a flooded bridge, a police official said. The bus with around 40 passengers plunged into a rivulet after being carried away by floodwaters near Maikanch village, some 470 km from here, Saturday evening. Four people, including a baby, were killed and 12 injured in the accident. In a separate incident, at least four people died and two sustained burn injuries Saturday night when lightning struck a slum in Cuttack, over 25 km from here. The injured are undergoing treatment in hospital and are out of danger, a district official said. Heavy rain has been lashing several part of Orissa since Saturday morning, affecting normal life in many areas. Titilagarh town in Bolangir district recorded maximum of 108 mm rainfall Saturday. State capital Bhubaneswar recorded 8.5 mm, an official of the Bhubaneswar meteorological centre said. The met office said most parts of the state would see heavy to very heavy rains in the coming couple of days as well due to a low pressure area formed over Bay of Bengal. IANS
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:34 PM Injured 4 of 5  0.0  Lake Guntersville Al 
 USA 
  on the beach  N/A  Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
Lightning strike kills 1, injures 4 By Elizabeth Summers The Reporter Published July 27, 2010 A family outing to beat the heat at Lake Guntersville ended in tragedy for a Huntsville family Sunday afternoon as a 15-year-old was killed. Strong thunderstorms rolled across the area late Sunday afternoon when a lightning bolt struck near the beach at Honeycomb Campground. The campground is located between Guntersville and Grant, just off U.S. 431. The lakefront area is a popular camping site and the beach offers canoe, paddle and pontoon boat rentals. A group of three family members was swimming in the lake when lightning struck. Two other family friends, who were out of the water, were also injured. Nearby swimmers and witnesses raced to help. According to Marshall County Coroner Marlon Killion, 15-year-old Elizabeth Montalvo, of 1011 Magnolia St., Huntsville, and her mother, Tomasa Ibanez, of the same address, were injured. A third, unidentified teenage girl was also injured while in the water. Witnesses pulled the women from the lake and began performing CPR on Montalvo. From what I understand, the victim had a 13-year-old sister nearby, along with another adult and teenager, Killion said. The mother, sister and victim were all in the water when the lightning struck. The other two people were on the lakeshore nearby and were also injured. A pair of Marshall Health System ambulances responded to the scene, transporting the women to Huntsville Hospital. Additional ambulances from HEMSI of Huntsville were dispatched to transport the other three victims. Marshall County Sheriffs deputies and officers from TVA also responded to the scene. Killion said Montalvo was pronounced dead upon arrival at Huntsville Hospital. Ibanez and the other victims were all treated and released, he said. It is a very, very tragic situation, Killion said. There were plenty of people around the area that initiated getting her help and doing CPR. People knew what to do and did what they could. When the ambulances showed up, they took over. Im sure everyone did everything humanly possible to save that young girl. Killion said he could not recall a similar incident happening in Marshall County in the past four years or more.
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:00 PM Killed Warren Douglas Smith  63.0  Annapolis MD 
 USA 
  on jet ski  N/A  Boat,Ground Strike,Indirect,On Water,Outside,Water 
MARYLAND: Lightning strike blamed in jet ski rider's death STAFF REPORT " JULY 29, 2010 Comments(0) Recommend Print this page E-mail this article Share Type Size A A A ANNAPOLIS  The Maryland Natural Resources Police say it appears that a lightning strike killed a 63-year-old Annapolis man who died Sunday while jet skiing on the Chesapeake Bay, just south of the Bay Bridge. NRP says it appears the man, Warren Douglas Smith, was racing back to port because of a thunderstorm. Investigators say it appears Smith was not struck directly by lightning, but was electrocuted by a nearby strike. Another jet ski rider, 65-year-old Elmer Sappington of Severn, was about 75 to 100 feet from Smith, but was not harmed by the lightning strike. NRP reminds boaters that summer thunderstorms are common and frequently occur during the late evening hours. Lightning can strike over ten miles away from heavy rain and storms. Anyone caught on the water during a thunderstorm should move to land and seek shelter immediately. As a matter of practice, boaters should review the weather forecast before leaving the dock and plan trips accordingly.
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:00 PM Injured man on innertube  0.0  Polk County TN 
 USA 
  floating on river in tube    Boat,Fresh Water,In Water,On Water,Outside,Swimming 
Man Struck By Lightning On Hiawassee River Comments 0 | Recommend 0 Police: Man Was On Raft Or Innertube July 25, 2010 11:58 PM Nathan Faulkner A man was struck by lightning while relaxing on the Hiawassee River in Polk County Sunday afternoon. Authorities tell us the man was floating on some sort of raft or innertube when he was struck. Tennessee Wildlife and Polk County authorities say the man was taken to a hospital. Authorities tell us the man complained of pain, but otherwise, his injury was not serious. The man's name was not released.
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:34 PM Injured 5 of 5  0.0  Lake Guntersville Al 
 USA 
  on the beach  N/A  Beach,Ground Strike,Outside 
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:34 PM Injured mother, family 2 of 5  0.0  Lake Guntersville Al 
 USA 
  swimming at campground  N/A  Camping,Ground Strike,In Water,Outside,Swimming,Water 
HUNTSVILLE, AL -- A 15-year-old girl was killed and four other people were injured by a lightning strike at Honeycomb Campground in Lake Guntersville Sunday afternoon, according to Marshall County Coroner Marlon Killion. The injured included the girl's mother, who was apparently also in the water at the time, he said. All were taken from the campground to Huntsville Hospital, according Don Webster, chief operations officer for HEMSI ambulance service. Names of the victims had not yet been released Sunday night, and additional official information about their conditions was unavailable. Webster said some of the victims were in the water and some at the water's edge when the lightning struck. HEMSI was called at 4:34 p.m. to assist and dispatched two ambulances to take three patients to the Huntsville Hospital Trauma Center. Marshall County Ambulance Service also dispatched two units and transported two patients to the hospital.
Sun, 07/25/2010 04:34 PM Killed Elizabeth Montalvo, family, 1 of 5  15.0  Lake Guntersville Al 
 USA 
  swimming at campground  N/A  Camping,Fresh Water,Ground Strike,In Water,Outside,Swimming 
15-Year-Old Dies in Lightning Strike A 15-year-old girl died after being struck by lightning at the Honeycomb Campground on Lake Guntersville. Staff Writer 8:38 PM CDT, July 25, 2010 Lake Guntersville - Marshall County Coroner Marlon Killion confirms to WHNT News 19 that a 15-year-old girl died Sunday afternoon after being struck by lightning. The girl was swimming with family at the Honeycomb Campground off of Honeycomb Road. The girl's mother and sister were also hurt in the strike. Both were taken to Huntsville Hospital. Sign up for news & weather email alerts from WHNT NEWS 19! Killion says the 15-year-old was pronounced dead in the emergency room at Huntsville Hospital. The Honeycomb Campground is located just off of highway 431 between Huntsville and Guntersville in Marshall County. Marshall County coroner identifies 15-year-old girl killed by lightning Published: Monday, July 26, 2010, 12:35 PM Updated: Monday, July 26, 2010, 12:37 PM Victoria Cumbow, The Huntsville Times Follow Share this story Story tools file image HUNTSVILLE, AL -- A teenager killed by a lightning strike Sunday has been identified as 15-year-old Elizabeth Montalvo of Huntsville, authorities said. Montalvo was struck by lightning while swimming at Honeycomb Campground at Lake Guntersville Sunday afternoon, said Marshall County Coroner Marlon Killion. 0 0 0 Share Killion said four others, including Montalvo's mother and sister, have been treated and released from Huntsville Hospital. Don Webster, chief operating officer for HEMSI, said some of the victims were in the water and some at the water's edge when the lightning struck. HEMSI was called at 4:34 p.m. to assist and dispatched two ambulances to take three patients to the Huntsville Hospital Trauma Center. Marshall County Ambulance Service also dispatched two units and transported two patients to the hospital. Montalvo was pronounced dead at Huntsville Hospital. Killion said the lightning strike caused her death.
Sun, 07/25/2010 12:30 AM Injured Cheyanne Wilmer  16.0  Star City WV 
 USA 
  holding on metal rail on balcony  N/A  Deck,Ground Strike,Metal,Metal Railing,Outside 
Hotel Worker Struck by Lightning Posted Sunday, July 25, 2010 ; 06:53 PM | View Comments | Post Comment Updated Sunday, July 25, 2010; 08:12 PM It happened at the Quality Inn in Star City Sunday. By Mike Krafcik Email | Bio | Other Stories by Mike Krafcik STAR CITY -- A teenager survived a big scare Sunday afternoon after she was struck by lightning. It happened at the Quality Inn in Star City where the girl worked. Employees say around 12:30 p.m. Cheyanne Wimer, 16, was working on the hotel's second floor balcony. They say she was holding onto the railing and was struck by lightning. Wimer was conscious and alert at the time of the accident. She was transported to Ruby Memorial Hospital. Nobody else on scene was injured. Copyright 2010 West Virginia Media. All rights reserved. This material may no
Sun, 07/25/2010 12:00 AM Killed David Eugene Lee   40.0  St Joe Beach Fl 
 USA 
  walking on beach  N/A  Beach,Outside,Walking 
Gulf County Lightning Kills Tourist 07/25/10 - 03:51 PM WMBB News Department RSS Feed St Joe Beach, Fla: A family vacation in Port St. Joe comes to a tragic end. A man who was visiting the area was walking on the beach Sunday afternoon when he was struck by lightning. Officials say it all happened off Highway 98 near the Beacon Hill Community in Port St. Joe. The Gulf County Sheriffs Office got the call around noon. They say the man was walking on St. Joe Beach. Officials confirm lightning struck and killed him. The sheriffs office isnt releasing anymore information until his family is notified. Read more: http://www.panhandleparade.com/index.php/mbb/article/gulf_county_lightening_kills_tourist/mbb7724921/#ixzz0umfGUpOs Man On Vacation Killed By Lightning Strike Posted: 5:50 am EDT July 27, 2010 ST. JOE BEACH, Fla. -- A Georgia man has died after being struck by lightning during his Florida vacation. The Gulf County Sheriff's Office says 40-year-old David Eugene Lee was hit Sunday while visiting a Panhandle beach with his wife and children. They spotted gathering storm clouds and began to leave the beach when Lee's wife heard thunder. She turned around to find her husband collapsed. Lee was pronounced dead after being rushed to a Port St. Joe hospital. Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Sun, 07/25/2010 05:00 PM Injured Steve   47.0  Leesylvania State Park Va 
 USA 
  in boat holding metal rod  N/A  Boat,Ground Strike,Indirect,On Water,Outside,Water 
Lightning victim, 47, recovering Image courtesy of NOAA By URIAH A. KISER Published: July 30, 2010 » 0 Comments | Post a Comment vote now Buzz up! It could take up to a year for a man who was struck by lightning Sunday to make a full recovery. The 47-year-old victim, Steve, and his wife were visiting the area, and were two of eight passengers aboard a 44-foot boat that had set sail on the Potomac River last weekend, said the boats captain, and Steves brother, Terry. Terry, did not provide his last name or his brothers, said he lives in Prince William County, and through his training in first aid and CPR did everything he could to help his brother after he was struck by the lightning bolt. I heard him scream, and then he just stood there and stared at his hands, and then he collapsed, he said. We made sure he kept his eyes open, kept checking his pulse and made sure he was breathing while we brought him back to shore so we could meet the paramedics. Steve was flown to Washington Hospital Centers burn unit where he was treated and later released. It was a perfect summer weekend that ended in peril, said Terry. Nearing the end of their weekend getaway on the river, Terry was piloting the craft back to port near Leesylvania State Park in Woodbridge when a large storm moved in just before 5 p.m. The storms high winds brought six to eight-foot waves, heavy downpours and a lot of lightning. Steve was inside the boat, holding a canvas which had a metal rod attached to it. By that time most of the wind had passed, but the rain and lightning still filled the skies, and thats when Steve was struck, said Terry. Initial reports from emergency crews indicated that the victim was outside of the boat, floating in the water. Terry said information got crossed between the boat crew and emergency workers that day. Those were the worst waves Ive ever seen on the Potomac, and you would never think that a 44-footer would get nervous, but it was scary out there, he said. That same storm was blamed for knocking out power to at least 94,000 power customers in Virginia, and many more in the Washington area. Terry said it is amazing that his brother is still alive after being struck by lightning. Staff writer Uriah A. Kiser can be reached at 703-530-3905.
Sat, 07/24/2010 12:00 PM Injured Johnny Cass 1 of 2  10.0  Chattahoochee River Ga 
 USA 
  on the water  N/A  Ground Strike,On Water,Outside,Water 
Boys Survive Lightning Strike On Chattahoochee By Veronica Waters @ July 26, 2010 8:53 AM Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBacks (0) (WSB Radio) Two boys are happy to be alive after lightning strike jolted them on the Chattahoochee River. WSB's Andrew Spencer reports 10-year-old Johnny and 12-year-old Joey Cass were enjoying some time on the water Saturday afternoon in Sandy Springs when bad weather moved in. "This lightning was unlike any lightning I've ever seen," their mother, Natalie D'Amato, tells Channel 2 Action News. "It was in front of my face. It just struck right between the boys and me." The boys described the strike as a big pulse which jolted through their bodies and stung. "It felt like a fiery pressure, and then once we were in the ambulance heading to the hospital, my legs felt numb," said Joey Cass. "My feet and my legs and my lower stomach hurt," Johnny Cass said. The boys were treated for minor burns and some small scars on their legs.
Sat, 07/24/2010 12:00 PM Injured Joey Cass 2 of 2  12.0  Chattahoochee River Ga 
 USA 
  on the water  N/A  Ground Strike,On Water,Outside,Water 
Sat, 07/24/2010 06:10 PM Injured Rosa Bachiller  0.0  Tarpon Springs Fl 
 USA 
  walking on causeway  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,Direct hit,Outside,Road,Walking 
Woman hit by lightning in Tarpon Springs Related Content http://www.tampatrib.com THE ASSOCIATED PRESS TARPON SPRINGS, Fla. -- A woman was struck by lightning as she and a man were walking along A Tarpon Springs causeway Fire rescue officials say the woman, who had not been identified, was on the Fred Howard Park causeway Saturday evening when she was hit. Some bystanders stopped put her in the back of a pickup truck, and drove her to a nearby park, where paramedics treated her and took her to a hospital. The woman's condition was not known. TAMPA - A 59-year-old Holiday woman struck by lightning Saturday is at Tampa General Hospital in critical condition. Rosa Bachiller was struck about 6:10 p.m. as she and her husband were walking along the causeway at Fred Howard Park in Tarpon Springs and intending to head home. By the time paramedics arrived a few minutes later, bystanders had loaded Bachiller aboard a pickup truck and met paramedics at the park gate. She was in cardiac arrest, said Deputy Chief Don Sayer of Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue. There were strong thunderstorms and frequent lightning strikes in the area, and the weather was too bad to call for a helicopter, Sayer said. Bachiller was first taken to Helen Ellis Hospital in Tarpon Springs, transferred to the regional burn center at Tampa General Hospital. Sixteen people in the United States have died from lightning strikes this year. None were in Florida. Last year, lightning killed 34 people nationwide and five in Florida. Florida leads the nation in lightning deaths from 1959 to 2009 with 460, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration website said. Florida gets an average of more than 1.4 million lightning strikes a year, according to the website. That's enough to hit every square mile of the state nearly 25 times.
Sat, 07/24/2010 08:00 PM Injured John Phillips  60.0  Youngstown Oh 
 USA 
  in backyard  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Outside,Yard 
Man apparently struck by lightning Email Print ShareThis Published: Tue, July 27, 2010 @ 12:00 a.m. Staff report Boardman A 60-year-old township man remains hospitalized after an apparent lightning strike. John Phillips was in the backyard at his Forest Lake Drive home Saturday when the fire department was called around 8 p.m. Witnesses at the scene said they saw a lightning flash, heard a simultaneous thunderclap and then saw Phillips lying on the ground. Phillips, who was unconscious and not breathing, was resuscitated by his neighbor, Dave Fiffick, general manager at the Struthers-based Clemente-McKay Ambulance Co., and by Fifficks wife and son. He was in critical condition late Monday night at St. Elizabeth Health Center in Boardman. We got a heartbeat back very quickly, said Fiffick, who previously worked as a paramedic and whose Aquadale Drive backyard abuts that of Phillips. Firefighters did not see burn marks and treated Phillips before sending him to St. Elizabeth, the fire report stated. Fiffick said, however, I think that the lightning had something to do with it. Lordstown coach on mend Phillips struck by lightning at home in wake of storm October 1, 2010 - By JOHN VARGO Tribune Chronicle Save | Post a comment | CANFIELD - Lordstown junior high cross country coach John F. Phillips stood there surrounded by his junior high cross country team at the Sept. 21 Suburban League Championships at the Canfield Fairgrounds. Then, one of the parents emphasized how much Phillips meant to them and the Lordstown community. On July 24, Phillips was struck by lightning in the backyard of his Boardman home. "Storm had blown through," said his son, John R. Phillips, who is the Boardman boys cross country coach and assistant track and field coach. "It was pretty well clear. He went outside to empty out one of those fire rings you get from Home Depot. It was filled with water and he was going to empty it out to toast marshmellows with my niece and my cousin's little boys. When he was outside dumping it, that's when he got hit. He was kind of bent over and got hit on top of the head. "Fortunately for him, he was standing in ponded ground. It was the water inside he was dumping out. So, the lightning dissipated through the water he was dumping out, so it didn't cause him to have any burns or anything on his feet." John F. Phillips, 60, doesn't recall the event. He just remembers what happened five hours earlier. "When I got zapped, we had just come back from a golf outing," he said. "It was about 3 o'clock and that's the last thing I remember, golfing. I got zapped at 8, so I lost all that time. Plus, the time I was in the hospital. I didn't wake up until Wednesday morning (July 28). So, I was out all that time. I have no recollection. "It's not as tramatic for me as it was for my family." John F. Phillips was quickly revived by his neighbor Dave Fiffick, general manager at Clemente-McKay Ambulance Co., and by Fiffick's wife and son, according to a published report. "I basically had two heart attacks, one when I got hit at first and my heart stopped there at home," John F. Phillips said. "The neighbor behind us got it revived again. When I got to the hospital, it stopped again. Basically two heart attacks with third-degree burns on my head. I aspirated when I first got in the hospital and I got pneumonia. That's what what really knocked me for a loop." He wore a hat to Canfield, but showed there is only a slight red mark on the crown of his head - virtually no trace of any injury. The elder Phillips remained resilient during the rehabilitation process, Phillips Jr. said. His father was inducted into the World Association of Benchers and Dead Lifters Hall of Fame on May 22 and prided himself on staying physically fit. "He is a living example of that. He works hard, keeps himself healthy, stays in shape," John R. Phillips said. "His recovery has been miraculous, in my opinion. When this first happened, I thought this was going to be a very long road to recovery. In less than a week and a half, he was moved from ICU to a regular room. Less than a week and a half later, he's getting released. Quite honestly, I was stunned. "He hasn't had a setback this entire process. The amazing part is every day he does a little bit more, but following what he's supposed to do - not overdoing it. I would've never thought he'd be working at the Spartan Invitational then the following Tuesday riding the bus with my team - heading out to Canfield to see our kids and his kids compete and talk to the parents on how he's ready to go for track. I never would've thought that this time last month." John F. Phillips was helping out at last weekend's Spartan Invitational in Boardman, but said the rehabilition is going slower than he'd like. "It's frustrating too," he said. "I'm used to being fairly active with the power lifting and all that. To get up and, after a week or two, being at home and not being able to do one push-up, it's kind of like you're starting all over again. It's slow, little by little. I remember when I first started walking, I couldn't walk down to the end of the driveway and back - about 50 feet. I was done for the day. Now, I'm able to do a mile or so. "It's coming back." He's planning on coming back to resume his job sometime in November as band director at Lordstown and continue coaching the indoor track and boys outdoor track teams. However, that will depend on his doctor's approval. For now, Frank Rahde, retired Lordstown girls cross country and track and field coach, took over Phillips' duties as junior high coach. "It was a little bit unexpected, but glad to do it for John," Rahde said. John F. Phillips was surprised by the outpouring of support. "I can't thank the people enough - hearing from people, prayers and all that - from people I don't even know," he said. "I've had cards from people that said, 'You don't even know me, but our prayer group from our church is praying for you.' I have a stack of get-well wishes and cards like that about 2 feet high. The kids were all worried. The parents at the school were all concerned. It really surprised me in a way that many people were concerned. It's great to see they're like that." jvargo@tribtoday.com
Fri, 07/23/2010 08:00 PM Injured man   54.0  Bronx NY 
 USA 
  walking  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Ground Strike,Outside,Under Trees,Walking 
Man Struck By Lightning In Brooklyn There was a victim from last night's sudden, violent storm: A 54-year-old man walking in Crown Heights was struck by lightning. According to the Daily News, he was "walking under some trees in the median of Eastern Parkway near Bedford Ave. A witness who was in her home at the time described, "His feet were smoking and he was bleeding from the mouth. It was terrifying." The Post says a Good Samaritan started CPR on him and then medics showed up and were able to revive in him the ambulance with the debibrillator. Lt. Joe Cengiz of EMS Station 38 said, "You could smell burning flesh. His heart stopped." The man is at Kings County Hospital on a respirator.
Fri, 07/23/2010 04:00 PM Killed 4 duck raisers  0.0  Manila  
 Philippines 
blamed on cell phone  inside a hut    Cell Phone,Ungrounded Shelter 
Lightning kills 4 in Camarines Sur abs-cbnNEWS.com Posted at 07/25/2010 1:45 PM | Updated as of 07/26/2010 12:18 AM MANILA, Philippines - Four duck raisers died Friday in Baao, Camarines Sur after being struck by lightning. The reported casualties are: Mario Morena, Michael Sinfuego and Roger and Benjie Felices. The duck raisers have asked permission from Remegio Besenio to use his farm. Because of the heavy downpour that afternoon, all 4 went inside a hut where they met their fate. Two of their colleagues were lucky enough to have avoided the same fate. Leslie Diamela and Marie Cedilla are now in the hospital recovering from their wounds. Diamela blamed the incident on a cellphone that they had kept inside the hut.  reports from ABS-CBN Bicol
Fri, 07/23/2010 08:40 PM Injured Laverne Cook  0.0  Bronx NY 
 USA 
  opening gate  N/A  Fence,Ground Strike,Indirect,Indoors,Metal 
Bronx Woman Survives Lightning Strike Flickr user W EndeavorsA Bronx security guard got an unexpected shock during Friday night's storm, as lightning struck her buzzer just as she was pressing the button! Laverne Cook was working at an East Tremont apartment building, buzzing a resident in around 8:40 p.m. At that moment, lightning struck the gate. She told the Daily News, "The lightning struck the gate as I pressed the button. It threw me back. The current went through my right arm." Though initially nobody heard her cries for help, her boss eventually came in, saw her swollen arm and called 911. She was rushed to St. Barnabas Hospital, where it was determined she had no life threatening injuries. She said her arm still tingles, but she fared better than another victim of the storm. A Crown Heights man is still in critical condition after being struck on Eastern Parkway. A witness said, "His feet were smoking and he was bleeding from the mouth. It was terrifying."
Fri, 07/23/2010 04:00 PM Killed Joe Strong  41.0  Walpole Island Ontario 
 Canada 
  on boat taking cover in reeds  N/A  Boat,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Police: Lightning Suspected In Ohio Man's Death Posted: 10:07 am EDT July 25, 2010 WALPOLE ISLAND, Ontario -- Police say an Ohio man has died after he was likely struck by lightning while boating near the Ontario-Michigan border. Provincial and local police say a 41-year-old Ravenna, Ohio, man died Friday while boating with family and friends near Walpole Island. His name has not been released. Authorities say the boaters took shelter in some reeds when a thunderstorm rolled in. Witnesses on the boat say they heard a loud crack and saw a bright flash before they saw a man lying on the deck. The U.S. Coast Guard found the boat and brought it ashore after someone called 911. An autopsy is scheduled for Saturday. Walpole Island is located about 30 miles northeast of Detroit. Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broad Lightning strike suspected in death of Ohio man BY CARYS MILLS, THE WINDSOR STAR JULY 24, 2010 WALPOLE ISLAND, Ont. -- A 41-year-old Ohio man who died on a boat near Lake St. Clair Friday afternoon may have been struck by lightning, according to the Canadian Coast Guard and police. A mayday call came in around 2:30 p.m. from a boat carrying three people near Walpole and Squirrel islands, which are near Sarnia, Ont. The boat, described as a small fishing boat, was in the Basset Channel off St. Clair River, said Maritime Rescue Coordinator Scott Miller. He said a private boat had stopped to help the victim and the other two people on the boat, who were unharmed. According to Walpole Island police and the OPP, the man was out on his bass boat with friends and family. When the storm moved in, the vessel attempted to take shelter in some reeds. The witnesses on the boat heard a loud crack and saw a bright flash. The Coast Guard transported the victim to the Walpole Island customs dock, Miller said. Police and ambulance were on scene, he said. © Copyright (c) The Windsor Star Read more: http://www.windsorstar.com/Lightning+strike+suspected+death+Ohio/3319315/story.html#ixzz0uma82CrY RAVENNA, Ohio -- According to the National Weather Service, the chance of being struck by lightning is one in 750-thousand. But for newlywed Melissa Strong, the unlucky odds were enough to claim one life, and change hers forever. Joe Strong,41, of Ravenna, was bass fishing on the Bassett Channel in Ontario Friday. His wife tells Fox 8 News she and her husband make the trip every year. Joe was set to compete in a bass fishing tournament Saturday, and had brought home two previous "Mr. Bass" titles. Melissa says Joe was a lifelong boater and fisherman, who knew the water well. After several beautiful days on the Canadian waters, on Friday, the winds changed. Melissa, Joe and a friend were on their small Ranger R83 boat, when the lightning began. "[Joe] started the boat and then he said, 'you know what, we're not gonna beat this.' It was just instant--the sky was black," explains Melissa. She says Joe steered the boat into a nearby patch of reeds for protection, but the storm was just too fast. "I saw this lightning strike and the crack was so loud," Melissa explains through tears. "I couldn't hear anything and I was like, 'what did that just hit, that was really close.' And I turned to my right and he fell over." Stunned and terrified, Melissa tried to perform CPR on her husband for an hour while rescuers scrambled to reach the boat, miles from shore. A tiny hole is all that remains from the powerful strike. Joe took on most of the force. "I kind of knew in my heart he was already gone, but I couldn't give up. I couldn't leave him [lying] there and not try," Melissa says. The couple was just married in April. Now Melissa says she hurts not only for her future, but for Joe's four children. "He will never hold his grandkids, he will never walk his daughter down the aisle," she says. "Not just is he the love of my life and my husband, but he's my best friend." According to the National Weather Service, the majority of lightning injuries or deaths on boats happen on small boats without a cabin. Any boater stuck in a similar situation should get to the lowest point of the boat and stay away from metal and radios, unless it is a dire emergency.
Thu, 07/22/2010 09:00 PM Injured Stephanie Boyce 1 of 2 sisters  0.0  Milwaukee Wi 
 USA 
  walking home   N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Walking 
Two women hospitalized after lightning strike on south side By Bruce Vielmetti of the Journal Sentinel Posted: July 22, 2010 |(11) COMMENTS Two sisters walking home with a sandwich were struck by lightning on Milwaukee's south side shortly after 9 p.m., witnesses said. The women were walking south along S. 25th St. just south of National Ave. April Sajuan said the women lived with their two children, their mother and another sister in the 2400 block of Mineral St. Sajuan said she gave the mother a ride to St. Luke's Hospital where the two women were taken by ambulance. No one answered at the door of women's apartment late Thursday. Christopher Smith, who lives in the front apartment of 902 S. 25th St. said he was watching TV when he saw a blinding white flash, felt a burn on his left foot and heard a loud bang. He said he ran outside and saw the two women on the sidewalk. A pair of the victims' shoes and a sandwich from Subway lay at the scene after the victims had been taken to the hospital. Sajuan said she heard police say the women seemed to have pulses when they were being treated by paramedics before they were taken to the hospital. An official at St. Luke's said he could provide no information on the women's conditions. Lightning Strike Victim Heals By Mick Trevey MILWAUKEE - One of the two sisters who was struck by lightning during last week's storm talked about how she is feeling. "Not a lot of people can stand here and honestly say that they went through something like this," said Stephanie Boyce. Stephanie Boyce and her sister, Mary Boyce, were walking on South 25th Street near Mineral Street when they were struck by lightning. Stephanie Boyce was released from the hospital. However, Mary Boyce remained at Aurora St. Luke's Medical Center in critical condition. "She is opening her eyes so she is watching you all on TV," Stephanie Boyce said of her sister. She added that Mary has been able to answer "yes" or "no" questions. Stephanie Boyce said she still feels weak on the right side of her body and has a difficult time writing. She also said she feels weak in one leg. "We were lucky. That we're still here - and I'm still here - to tell everybody thank you and that life isn't a game," she said. Stephanie Boyce said she will avoid going out in the rain because she is scared of storms. She also said that being strong during her recovery is important to her family. "I have to be strong for a lot of people to let them know even though I still have struggles going on with my body, that I'm going to be okay," she said.
Thu, 07/22/2010 09:00 PM Injured Mary Boyce 2 of 2 sisters  0.0  Milwaukee Wi 
 USA 
  walking home   N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Walking 
Thu, 07/22/2010 05:30 PM Killed Dean Duchenne 1 of 2  22.0  Alberta  
 Canada 
  putting up fence  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Delayed Death,Farming,Fence,Outside 
Ranch worker killed by lightning   BY SHERRI ZICKEFOOSE, CALGARY HERALD JULY 28, 2010 2:08 AM   A chance to work at the 2010 Winter Olympics and experience life as a southern Alberta ranch hand lured Dean Duchenne from South Africa. The 22-year-old's dreams of adventure in the Canadian West came to an abrupt end, however, when he was killed by a bolt of lightning during a storm Thursday. Claresholm RCMP say Duchenne and two friends were putting up fencing at Sears Ranches Beaver Camp when threatening weather began rolling in at around 5:30 p.m., cutting short their work northwest of Stavely. As they were heading back to their work truck, Duchenne was blasted by a direct lightning strike. "Poor lad. He travelled halfway around the world to be here," said Claresholm RCMP Cpl. Dalyn Orsten. "I think it's safe to say that's not something that's ever going to happen here again." A friend walking beside Duchenne was also injured and briefly knocked unconscious. An uninjured co-worker performed CPR on Duchenne until help arrived. Duchenne was taken to High River hospital and later transferred to Calgary's Foothills. He died Friday morning. Duchenne arrived in Canada last December with three friends to work at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver and Whistler. With many more months left on their visas, the group found work at the Sears Ranch in March. Despite having no ranching experience, Duchenne was a fast learner and a hard worker, his boss said. "No experience, but he was a good kid. They were all good kids," said Jeff Sears, who put the young men to work with livestock and other agricultural chores. Thursday's freak occurrence is made more upsetting because the crew was following safety procedures by stopping work under thunderstorm conditions, said their boss. "They did everything right, that's what's so frustrating," said Sears. "He was very, very outgoing, everybody who met him enjoyed him and liked him." szickefoose@theherald.canwest.com © Copyright (c) The Calgary Hera Lightning kills man near Stavely Written by Lethbridge Herald Tuesday, July 27 2010, 8:51 PM A young man from South Africa on an agricultural exchange near Stavely was struck and killed by lightning late last week. Dean Duchenne, 22, was with a group of others out fencing northwest of Stavely late last Thursday afternoon. The weather had been somewhat rainy with plenty of thunder and lightning, said Claresholm RCMP Cpl. Dalyn Orsten. Three of the group had been walking together when one ran to a vehicle to grab a coat because of the rain. The other two were still walking when they were struck by lightning. Mr. Duchenne took the brunt of it. The other fellow also had some injuries but not fatal, Orsten said. A companion performed CPR on Duchenne until emergency services arrived from Claresholm and Nanton. Duchenne was taken to High River Hospital and then transferred to Foothills Hospital in Calgary where he succumbed to his injuries Friday morning. Duchennes family and the South African Embassy were notified and arrangements have been made to transport the body back to South Afr 2010/08/04 A ONCE-in-a-lifetime trip to Canada by a Rhodes University graduate and his friends ended in heartache when he was killed by a freak bolt of lightning that hit him in the chest last week. Dozens of Rhodes University students are expected to make the trek up to Durban to attend the funeral of popular 22-year-old social sciences student Dean Du Chenne tomorrow . His heartbroken sister, Janet Du Chenne, yesterday told the Dispatch her brother s death had been a huge shock. Our parents spoke to him on the day it happened & hours later he was dead. According to Janet , Du Chenne and four or five close mates travelled to Canada in December to work at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Whistler. He spent a few months prepping people for the ski slopes & he even helped (singer) Queen Latifah put her boots on a few times. With several months left on their visas, Du Chenne and two friends decided to tour Canada before opting to work a few months as farmhands on a southern Alberta ranch. They had been working on the farm for two months and had just returned from the Calgary Stampede (an annual festival) a week before the freak accident. Janet said Du Chenne and two friends were working on fencing on the farm when a terrific lightning storm forced them to pack up. A friend walking beside Du Chenne was also injured and knocked unconscious . Janet said a second worker, a friend called Mikki, performed CPR on Du Chenne and kept him going until he was airlifted to hospital. He was put on life support, but his kidneys failed and his blood pressure dropped & he died the next morning. Farmer Jeff Sears said: He was very, very outgoing, everybody who met him enjoyed him and liked him. Du Chennes funeral will take place in Virginia outside Durban tomorrow . A memorial service will be held soon at Rhodes University. He is survived by two sisters  Janet and Claire  and his father Dennis and mother Diane. - By DAVID MACGREGOR Port Alfred Bureau davidm@dispatch.co.za
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 PM Injured 3 of 3  0.0  Huntsville UT  
 USA 
  at work    Ground Strike,Indirect,Outside,Work 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 3  0.0  Huntsville UT  
 USA 
  at work    Ground Strike,Indirect,Outside,Work 
Wed, 07/21/2010 04:00 PM Injured Kolby White 1 of 3  0.0  Huntsville UT  
 USA 
  at work  N/A  Ground Strike,Indirect,Work 
Hello i am Kolby White of Ogden Utah. This summer on the 21 of July My two friends and i were struck by lightning in Huntsville Utah while at work. While none of us were seriously injured, we do have some memory loss and had to stay over night in the hospital, mostly for our muscle deterioration. I was just looking around on the web and happen to find your web site, its awsome what you are doing and i wish you the best of luck! Sincerely, Kolby White
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 10 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 04:00 PM Injured man   70.0  Green Valley AZ 
 USA 
  found face down in pecan field  N/A  Farming,Field,Ground Strike,Outside,Work 
Man possibly struck by lightning, taken to hospital Posted - 7/21/2010 at 8:16PM SHARE THIS Share GREEN VALLEY - A man has been taken to a local hospital, he says he was struck by lightning. The man was found face down in a pecan field in Green Valley. His co-workers found him and took him to a near-by Green Valley Fire station. According to a Green Valley Fire spokesperson, the victim said he was struck by lightning. He was taken to St. Mary's Hospital, his condition is unclear, but he was awake and talking at the fire department. Man struck by lightning; power out at 19,000 homes Green Valley firefighters look over a burned palm tree in The Villages after a lightning strike Wednesday. Photo by Regina Ford/Green Valley News By Alex Dalenberg and Regina Ford Green Valley News Published: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 5:59 PM MST A FICO employee apparently struck by lightning during a monsoon Wednesday afternoon is expected to survive. The same storm struck at least one palm tree in The Villages and left 19,000 homes without power for about an hour after downing four power poles near Three Points. Firefighters said the man, who is in his 70s, was brought into Green Valley Fire District Station 153 on Continental Road about 4 p.m. and was transported to a Tucson hospital. According to a FICO spokeswoman, the man was on a radio with a supervisor who heard the crack of lightning. He went to the employee's location and found him face-down under a tree. She said its unclear whether he was struck by lightning and said the man was disoriented but talking. The man is a longtime FICO employee and lives in Continental. FICO owns the pecan groves that run through Sahuarita and Green Valley. Trico spokeswoman Romi Carrell Wittman said about 19,000 homes throughout the southern half of Trico Electric Cooperative Inc.s service area, including Sahuarita and Green Valley, were without power after a suspected microburst. Carrell said four high-voltage power lines owned by Southwest Transmission, which feeds into the Trico system, were knocked down in a storm moving through the area. The power lines went down on West Manville Road near North Trico Road in the Picture Rocks area. About half our system is out right now, Wittman said before the power was restored, meaning every area Trico serves south of Marana. Its a pretty significant outage. Wittman said the microburst must have been powerful because it knocked down relatively new power poles. It took Trico about an hour to restore power to most areas. Most of the 19,000 homes were back in service by 4:30 p.m., except about 1,500 people living in the Three Points area. Firefighters also put out a palm tree fire in the 700 block of West Rio San Pedro, in The Villages subdivision. Nobody was injured and no homes were damaged. The National Weather Service in Tucson issued a flood advisory for east central Pima County, including Green Valley, Sahuarita, Madera Canyon, Amado and north central Santa Cruz County until 5:45 p.m. Rainfall amounts up to 1.5 inches in one hour are possible and excessive runoff is likely to cause flooding in washes and streams, streets, underpasses and other drainage areas and low lying spots.
Wed, 07/21/2010 08:30 PM Injured Nathan Natole  18.0  Oakland ME 
 USA 
  inside on plugged in laptop    Computer / Video Game,Indirect,Indoors 
OAKLAND - Nathan Natole, 18, was sitting in his living room about 8:30 p.m. July 21, playing poker on his laptop. click image to enlarge Nathan Natole, shown with his mother, Pam, uses his laptop at their home in Oakland. He was recharging the computer in his bedroom when lightning struck nearby on July 21, causing injuries to his leg and head and leading to a seizure. David Leaming/Morning Sentinel Select images available for purchase in the Maine Today Photo Store Outside, a light rain fell and rumbles of thunder echoed in the distance. The laptop's battery was running low, so Natole told his mother, Pam, that he was going downstairs to his bedroom to recharge it. He sat on his bed, his back against the wall, the computer on his lap. About five minutes later, there was a loud "boom" and a flash of light that tripped the smoke alarms and a circuit breaker. Pam Natole ran to the top of the stairs and yelled, "Nate, are you all right?" Silence. Downstairs, she found her son "in a full seizure," with blood spilling from his mouth because he had bitten his tongue. She called 911 and was told to try and flatten out his shaking body. "As I grabbed his legs, I felt the electricity in my hands," Pam recalled. "Then he went limp." Nathan Natole spent two days in the hospital before returning home. In a recent interview, Natole said he has recovered, the only lasting evidence of the incident a scar on his left leg and a small patch of scorched hair on the back of his head. Natole recently graduated from Messalonskee High School and plans to attend Husson University in Bangor this fall. Although the National Weather Service says the odds of being struck by lightning in a given year are one in 750,000, Natole's experience comes on the heels of a similar case several miles away. Vicki Nadeau, 20, of Winslow apparently was struck by lightning June 20 in Waterville. Nadeau, a waitress at Ruby Tuesday, was walking out to the parking lot during a storm when she was zapped and thrown back against a wall, leaving her bloodied and burned. John Jensenius, a meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Maine and national spokesman for lightning awareness, said the two local incidents are the only ones he's aware of this year in Maine. "It's fairly unusual for people to be struck by lightning, but at the same time it's probably not as unusual as people think," Jensenius said, "but it is unusual to have two people being struck and injured in two separate incidents so close together." An estimated 500 to 600 people are hit by lightning in the U.S. each year, Jensenius said, and about one in 10 are killed. As of Thursday, 21 Americans had died from lightning strikes so far this year, he said. Maine has had five fatalities in the past decade. Nathan Natole said he has no memory of the lightning strike. One minute he was using the laptop; the next he was in the emergency room at Inland Hospital in Waterville -- he was later transferred to Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor. Natole underwent X-rays and tests during two days at the hospital and was determined to be OK. Pam Natole said her son was "quite the attraction" in Bangor -- hospital officials were interested in his case because it appeared that the electrical current had traveled through both his heart and brain. Natole said he had been diagnosed with mononucleosis earlier that week and said he was feeling more pain from the viral illness than from being zapped by lightning. His laptop appeared to be unharmed by the lightning strike. "I'm just happy to be alive," he said. "I am a little nervous about storms now." For Pam Natole, the experience has been a wake-up call to be extra careful when a storm is nearby. "It's a good lesson," she said. "People need to think twice."
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 16 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 15 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 14 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 13 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Killed Brandon Oldenkamp 12 of 16 climbers  21.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Rangers recovered the body of Brandon Oldenkamp, 21, of Sandborn, Iowa, on Thursday. He was blown off the mountain by lightning but was not a member of Walkers group.
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 11 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 9 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Busting myths about bursting lightning clouds NOLS instructor wrote the book about protecting yourself from electrocution in the backcountry. print page | send as email | email editor By Angus M. Thuermer Jr., Jackson Hole, Wyo. August 11, 2010 First of two parts  Eds. When Brandon Oldenkamp was knocked off the Grand Teton by an electrical storm July 21, rangers had no official registry where they could add his name to those of others whose deaths are caused by lightning. Although flashes of lightning and claps of thunder have been scaring religion into humans for thousands of years, society hasnt established a government catalog in which to list lightning-caused deaths. The group StruckByLightning.org attempts a compilation, listing 34 dead and 253 injured by lightning in 2009. Because reports of lightning deaths are not collected by official sources, and private collations are recent, myths about how to avoid the relatively rare cause of death, and even how rare it might be, swirl through the outdoors community. Mountaineers, backpackers, golfers, boaters and others who believe in these myths can increase the threats to themselves, experts say. From lightning never strikes ... to theories about a cone of safety beneath trees, outdoorsmen and women venture out largely in ignorance when it comes to protecting themselves from the common thunderstorm. That there were few facts on which a rambler might tailor his or her reaction to lightning irked an instructor from the National Outdoor Leadership School in Lander when he assembled a conference on wilderness risk more than a decade ago. One gap in information I identified was lightning safety, said John Gookin, a 29-year NOLS instructor and school curriculum manager for more than two decades. Scientists really couldnt tell us much. After a year of research, followed by another decade of refinements, Gookin has a pamphlet, Backcountry Lightning Risk Management, that outlines the best strategies to avoid lightning and some of the science behind them. Key to taking action, he said, is to know what parts of lightning strikes cause the most injuries and deaths. First, Gookin advocates avoidance. Those outdoors can take four steps to stay away from lightning, he says in his publication. He references researcher Bill Roeder, who says each strategy is twice as important as the one that follows. First, one should time visits to high-risk areas to synchronize with benign weather patterns. A practical application would be to summit the Grand Teton in the morning, before thunderstorms have a chance to develop. Climbing guides adopt this practice as religion. Six Exum mountain guides ushered a dozen clients to the summit of the Grand and were out of danger by the time the July 21 storm hit. There is no such thing as a surprise storm, Gookin writes. The next piece of advice is to find safer terrain at the sound of thunder. In the case of mountaineers, this commonly means going down. On a clear day, hikers and climbers can hear thunder from lightning 10 miles away. With wind, the distance might be five miles or less. In hard rain, the audible distance may be as short as a mile. A measure called the 30/30 rule advises to find shelter in a building when the time between a lightning flash and a thunderclap is less than 30 seconds. Once in the building, remain there for 30 minutes. Without a building to retreat to, more caution is necessary. The day Oldenkamp was killed, one Exum guide and his client turned back from the 13,770-foot high Grand when they were just above 12,000 feet. A guide with Jackson Hole Mountain Guides was within a few hundred feet of the summit when he and his client retreated. All three parties that were shocked by lightning July 21  17 persons in all  had mulled whether they should retreat or wait to see if storms would grow worse or disperse. All reported hearing thunder before conditions worsened and they decided to go down. Safe terrain is generally lower, as lightning tends to hit peaks and ridges. Also, lightning tends to strike more frequently on the side of a peak that the storm is approaching, so the leeward slope of the mountain is safer. If there is a choice, it is better to descend away from a storm, Gookin advises. Tents need to be pitched with the threat of lightning in mind. If they are higher than the ground around they can serve as conduits for a charge. Gookin recommends having a plan to abandon a tent at night in cases when the tent is the highest point during an electrical storm. In gently rolling hills, lightning strikes are random and elevation does not play a key role. Nevertheless, in such locations it is best to seek a dry ravine in which to find shelter. In wide-open country, avoid higher trees or even bushes. When a storm approaches, a group should spread out with 50 feet between members to reduce the chance that several persons will be struck at the same time. During the July 21 storm, at least one party tried to regroup during the lightning. Two of the four were seriously injured by a strike, and one could not descend without help. Wet ground is no more dangerous than dry ground, according to Gookins pamphlet. In fact, wet ground tends to dissipate ground charges faster. Standing in water, however, is very dangerous during a thunderstorm. Cavers should avoid the mouth of caverns during a thunderstorm. Climbers who seek shelter under an overhang need to be aware that lightning might jump the gap between the lip of an overhang and the floor, possibly through the body of a person standing there. On the Grand during the fatal storm last month, at least one party sought shelter under an overhang. A rescue ranger also was shocked during the storm at the 13,200-foot high Upper Saddle, site of a large overhang, when he put his hand against a dry rock wall. Boaters should avoid thunderstorms. More are struck on lakes than on rivers in canyons, probably because canyon walls above rivers attract more strikes than the waterway itself. Again, shoreline trees can be dangerous. The third of the four overall strategies is to avoid trees and long conductors if lightning gets close, Gookin advises. If you must move through a forest during a storm, he says, stay away from tree trunks. Lone trees are especially dangerous. Also, hikers should avoid meadows that are 100 yards or more across. Finally, if lightning is striking nearby, get in the lightning position  squating with feet together, arms wrapped around the legs and head tucked downward. Keeping feet together significantly reduces the effect of ground current, the cause of about half of lightning fatalities. Crouching slightly reduces the potential of being struck by a side flash. If one is outdoors and feels, hears or sees an electrostatic field, that is a sign that a discharge could be imminent. Clues are buzzing sounds, the raising of hair and a tingling sensation, or a glow at night from points like rocks or even fingertips. An acrid swimming-pool smell of ozone is a by-product of a discharge, Gookin writes. Backcountry travelers who experience any of these signs should take action immediately, as seconds can count. Gookin, a Lander resident, originally came to his conclusions after a year of research. Those above were refined in the subsequent decade and presented this spring at the 21st International Lightning Detection Conference in Orlando, Fla. The big shift is that we now realize that hardly anyone gets a direct strike by lightning any more, Gookin said. We use an epidemiology approach  who gets ill or injured, then why. Who dies from lightning has changed over the last decades, Gookin said. We dont have farmers sitting on open tractors in fields any more. Kids dont play outside as much as they used to." Gookin added. "Our play is more structured than it used to be. Now kids get shuttled by their soccer moms." What became more important was recent data rather than lots of data, he said of todays understanding of lightning. Theres a team that works on this, that gives reports at this conference every two years. Still, information remains incomplete. There are no incident rates, Gookin said. We dont know how many people die in the U.S. or outside the U.S. Also we have no rates of people who do these activities who dont get struck. To get a complete understanding, It would take some big projects by grad students and it would take years, he said. Dwelling on fears of backcountry electrocution is unnecessary, Gookin said. Those who are afraid of lightning need not shun the woods. If we need absolute safety, not only should we not go to the wilderness but we sure better not drive there, he said. If we want to stay reasonably safe, then we can do this [wilderness] stuff as long as we make fairly conservative decisions.
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured Matt Walker 7 of 16 climbers  21.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Climber: Shocks, terror print page | send as email | email editor By Angus M. Thuermer Jr., Jackson Hole, Wyo. July 24, 2010 One of 16 climbers saved after a lightning storm Wednesday on the Grand Teton described extremely painful shocks, hours of terror and finally emotional collapse in the hands of his rescuers. Matt Walker, 21, of West Lafayette, Indiana, told his story Friday from his bed in St. Johns Medical Center, where he was recovering from burns caused by the lightning. His right foot was bandaged and swollen following a surgery during which doctors made three incisions to allow damaged muscles to swell. He described a burn on the top of the foot three inches in diameter. Other burns the size of dimes and smaller speckled his calf. Walker said he wanted to tell his story in part to express thanks to his rescuers and caregivers. Grand Teton National Park climbing rangers and other emergency personnel  83 in all  helicoptered 16 climbers from the 13,770-foot- high peak the day of the storm. Rangers recovered the body of Brandon Oldenkamp, 21, of Sandborn, Iowa, on Thursday. He was blown off the mountain by lightning but was not a member of Walkers group. Walkers team of four was on schedule to make the summit and be off the top of the peak by 12:30 p.m., he said. They anticipated afternoon thunderstorms. After leaving the 11,650-foot Lower Saddle at 5:45 a.m., they climbed most of the Exum Ridge and were close to the summit about 10 a.m. when a small storm moved in. That pinned the group down for a while but a second, larger storm didnt seem to be headed toward the mountain. We thought it would kind of go south of us, but it kind of crept up on us, Walker said. That brought hail and snow and it really started thundering and lightning, Walker said. Then I experienced the first small lightning strike; it was very mild like I touched my hand to an electric fence. Walker and his partner moved up the mountain to find their two companions and all huddled under an overhang. They took off all their metal hardware and packs and made a pile nearby. We could start to hear the air buzzing with all the electricity, Walker said. Then came the first big strike. It was extremely jolting, extremely painful, he said. You just kind of lost momentary use of your limbs. The four huddled, standing or crouching on their climbing ropes in an effort to insulate themselves from the mountain. We could hear sparks and strikes up above, he said. Then we got struck again. That one was a lot more of a blast, he said. It kind of put us on our butts. It was extremely loud, like you were in an explosion. I just remember screaming in pain, Walker said. One of the images burned in my brain is looking at my friends and seeing the anguish in their faces. Nobody could figure out what to do. A third blast hit the group and then they took stock. Rescue, it seemed, would be impossible so they decided they had to move or die. One member went down by himself toward the Owen-Spalding route, the traditional descent for help. Walker and his two partners lowered one another, rappelled and climbed down in the same direction. Walker could use only one leg, a companion couldnt use her hands. After several rope lengths of this, including a wild fall and swing that knocked Walker into the mountainside, they heard a voice. It was Jenny Lake climbing ranger Helen Bowers, who had climbed up from the Lower Saddle. She got the group settled, Walker said. At that point all my emotions washed over me and I broke down, he said. I was so relieved. I thought we might actually get off this thing. More rescuers began appearing on the summit block and the park rescue helicopter ferried, at the end of a line, harness screamer suits for the victims so they could be plucked from the mountain. Walker described being clipped to a line hanging below the hovering airship, being lifted off the peak and flown down to the Lower Saddle where rangers and a doctor had assembled. From there he got inside a helicopter for a flight down to the Lupine Meadows rescue cache on the valley floor. Those heli guys were extremely efficient, he said of the rangers. The rescuers were great and knew exactly what they were doing.
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 6 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured Betsy Smith 5 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
A year after daring rescue, Teton lightning incident reminds of backcountry danger Story Discussion Image (5) By KELSEY DAYTON Star-Tribune staff writer | Posted: Sunday, July 24, 2011 11:00 am | No Comments Posted Font Size: Default font size Larger font size BRADLY J. BONER | JACKSON HOLE NEWS & GUIDE | AP Injured climbers Matt Walker, left, and Betsy Smith are assisted from a rescue helicopter July 21, 2010, in Grand Teton National Park. Seventeen climbers in three separate parties on the Grand Teton required assistance after a thunderstorm and severe lightning struck the area. One person was killed. (1) More Photos How does lightning form? When warm air in tall clouds wafts upward so high it freezes, the air reverses direction and ice particles fall past more warm air continuing to rise. Static electricity forms, just like when rubbing your feet on carpet. Static electricity is simply a gathering of electrons. The static charge keeps building until it's strong enough and sparks across a gap to connect extra electrons (those with negative charges) to missing ones (the positive charge). Most lightning shoots cloud to cloud -- only a fifth actually strike the ground. A stepped leader breaks trail for the bolts that collide with the ground. The leader moves in 50-meter spurts, and when it gets within 200 meters of the ground, it attracts an opposite charge from below. Some leaders come up from the ground, especially from tall objects. When an upward leader and a downward leader connect they cause a return stroke, or bolt that explodes in the air and creates a roar of thunder. Source: John Gookin, NOLS curriculum and research manager and a member of the National Weather Service Lightning Safety Team Lightning strike odds Lightning kills about 40 people annually and injures 360 in the United States. * Chance of being killed by lightning: 1/1,000,000. * Chance of being injured by lighting: 1/775,000. * Chance of being struck by lightning in your lifetime (80 years): 1/10,000 So far this year 11 people have been killed. Statistics are based on averages, but in recent years the number of deaths has decreased, perhaps because of education and lightning awareness. Source: Mary Ann Cooper, Department of Emergency Medicine and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois-Chicago How to avoid lightning strikes Sometimes lightning strikes are unavoidable. But there are things you can do to lessen your chances of being caught and injured in a storm. Know the weather patterns in the area where you are venturing. Different places in the country are more likely to get storms at different times in the day. The mantra for Wyoming is "Up by noon, off by 2." If you hear thunder, find safer terrain as soon as possible. Avoid ridges, trees and long conductors like a fence. If you are in a big group, spread out to avoid one strike hitting multiple people, but stay close enough to maintain communication. Stay about 20 feet apart. If you find yourself caught with lightning nearby, get into the lightning position, feet together, which reduces the ground current, crouched and if possible on a foam pad. Source: John Gookin, NOLS curriculum and research manager and a member of the National Weather Service Lightning Safety Team How to treat lightning victims in the backcountry * Wait to respond until the scene is safe. * Treat the non-moving victims first when conducting triage. * Offer basic life support, such as rescue breathing. * Do a complete body assessment. * Monitor victims. There could be hidden or lingering issues. * Evacuate victims for further treatment. Source: John Gookin, NOLS curriculum and research manager and a member of the National Weather Service Lightning Safety Team ÿJACKSON  There was no noise. Just a blinding flash of white light. And then floating, as though her mind and body separated. Betsy Smith watched as her partners slumped over, struck unconscious by the blast. Then she felt searing pain and couldnt move. Your body just feels it has turned into boiling soup, she said in an interview last year. It was as though her bones melted away. And it wasnt over yet. When Smiths mind worked through the murk of pain to function, it was only to wait, with dread, for the next strike. It was kind of an impending feeling, she said. Something was going to happen, but you dont know when or where. Lightning struck and stranded Smith and her three companions, Matt Walker, Alan Kline and Andrew Larson, on the 13,770-foot Grand Teton on July 21, 2010. The storm killed 21-year-old Brandon Oldenkamp, splayed a finger on Smiths hand to the point it needed amputation, and called for the largest rescue in Grand Teton National Park history as rangers set out to rescue Smith, Walker, Kline and Larson  as well as a party made up of Greg Sparks, Barry Sparks, John Armstrong, Cameron Johnson, Bob Miller, Dave Stenzel and Tim Vogeloar, and another party of Steve Tyler, Mike Tyler, Dan Tyler, Henry Appleton and Troy Smith. A year later, the rescue stands as a reminder of the force and danger lightning in the backcountry presents, especially in Wyoming during July and August. No. 1 for lightning deaths Wyoming is the No. 1 state in the U.S. in lightning deaths based on population, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Despite its small population, it ranks 27th in the U.S. overall for the most lightning-related deaths. Part of the high death and injury rate in Wyoming could be due to industry in the area  ranchers on open plains fixing fences, or energy industry workers atop big machinery. But it also is due in part to the popularity of outdoor recreation. There are only so many days you can get up the Grand Teton, said John Gookin of Lander, a National Outdoor Leadership School curriculum and research manager and a member of the National Weather Service Lightning Safety team. And those days are usually in peak thunderstorm season for Wyoming, July and August. Backcountry lightning science is still developing. In 1999, Gookin invited a lightning scientist to NOLS to discuss outdoor lightning safety. He didnt have much to say, Gookin said. There was little research on lightning safety in the backcountry. Gookin went on to develop the topic and in 2010 presented at an international lightning conference. He also started giving presentations to instructors at NOLS, explaining how to treat backcountry lightning injuries and how to avoid them, while also reminding them if you are caught in a thunderstorm in the backcountry, there isnt a lot you can do other than wait and hope. Most lightning shoots cloud to cloud  only a fifth actually strikes the ground, Gookin said. As lightning nears the ground it attracts an opposite charge from below, often from tall objects, called an upward leader. When the upward leader connects with the downward one they cause a return stroke, or bolt that explodes in the air and creates the roar of thunder. Upward leaders are powerful enough kill people, but it is the return stroke that acts like a hand grenade, exploding with a 5-meter kill radius. It was really crazy Chris Harder sat in the rescue cache at Lupine Meadows in Grand Teton National Park on July 21, 2010. The Jenny Lake Climbing Rangers just completed a mission to recover the body of Jillian Drow, a University of Michigan student who died the day before after a fall on the 12,804-foot Middle Teton. Harder, who acted as incident commander on the mission, kicked the other rangers out of the cache and began to decompress. The phone rang. Idaho 911 transferred a call to Grand Tetons dispatch center. Lightning struck and paralyzed three people in a five-person group in the Owen Chimney on the Grand Teton. The Jenny Lake Climbing Rangers arent unfamiliar with lightning rescues on the Grand. In July 2003, a lightning bolt killed 25-year-old Erica Summers and ricocheted off rocks, striking four others. Rangers rescued 13 people from the mountain that day. Still, lightning strikes on the Grand are far from routine, and they normally dont occur until late afternoon. Copy that, Harder said. Go ahead and page Jenny Lake Rangers. Pilot Matt Heart had just left the cache and was on his way to a wildfire when he got a call to turn around. All he knew was someone had been hit by lightning on the Grand. As rescue personnel began their return to the rescue cache, which would become the staging ground, patchy cell phone calls continued to come in from the mountain. The numbers grew. Lightning struck seven people. Someone was paralyzed. Several were paralyzed. Someone fell off the mountain. It was very dynamic, Harder said. We were getting information constantly. The numbers just kept multiplying. It was really crazy because it was changing as the rescue was developing. With storms still simmering in the area, while calls came in, the rangers assessed if they could safely fly. We were pretty much at the mercy of the weather, Harder said. We had clouds from the word go. Heart flew Harder, Jack McConnell and Helen Bowers up first to the lower saddle of the Grand at 11,600 feet. The sky was overcast and raining. Heart couldnt see far. Thin air at higher elevation takes away from a helicopters response time. Flying in the Tetons takes patience and a little finesse. Its a very sluggish environment, Heart said. Theres not a lot of air to work with up there. Heart deposited McConnell and Bowers on the mountain and took off on aerial surveillance of the mountain, looking for patients. By the time they were on the ground, McConnell and Bowers knew it was a big rescue. McConnell and Bowers, joined by Exum Mountain guide Dan Corn, who was at the saddle, started up the mountain, planning to sweep the popular Owen-Spalding route from where calls for rescue had come. They watched concerning cloud coverage to the east and west of the mountain, but felt safe enough to continue. From the cache, meteorologist Jim Woodmency supplied spot forecasts as the rangers headed upward, meeting victims and assessing their conditions, still unsure of how many were on the mountain. Corn and McConnell came across seven zombie-like climbers preparing to rappel into an area known as the Idaho Express. The walking wounded showed varying degrees of consciousness. You could tell they had been through an event that changed them profoundly, not only probably emotionally, but physically too, McConnell said. How are you guys? they asked. Were not so good. We lost one over the edge. Where? McConnell pressed. Were they on a rope? Yes, one said. No, another said. Something happened, a third said. The group was talking about Oldenkamp. An investigation would later prove he had been tied into a rope, but the lightning still blasted him off the mountain, sending him into a 2,000-foot fall. As rescuers continued their way upward, they stumbled across another man sitting in the snow off the rope. He said he couldnt feel his legs. McConnell and Corn secured the man and went to the nearby chimney where they found three more. Meanwhile, Smith, Kline, Walker and Larsons party were performing the very heroic act, McConnell said, of descending the mountains themselves. Early storms The day before embarking on a climb of the Grand, the party checked the weather reports and saw predictions of afternoon thunderstorms. Kline, a certified mountain guide, studied maps. While the rest of the group gathered supplies or joked around, Kline sat to the side, memorizing the mountain  something that would later become more important than anyone imagined  and crafting a plan that would get them up to the summit and back to the mountains lower saddle before noon and the predicted thunderstorms. They left the lower saddle where theyd camped at about 5:30 a.m., Walker said. The plan originally was to climb the full Exum route on the Grand Teton, but the group of experienced climbers found the pace slower than expected. They decided to alter their course and tackle the Owen-Spalding route to the Upper Exum to save time and get off the mountain before the predicted storms. They didnt know that the weather had already made a plan of its own. Earlier that day the weather began to brew its storms. Monsoon moisture arrived from the south, which fueled the thunderstorms, Woodmency said. The thing about the monsoon moisture is its a very moist and unstable air mass that comes with it, he said. Its capable of generating thunderstorms in any time of day or night. In the Tetons, people are used to recreating in the morning, expecting the thunderstorms at night, often using an alpine start, or setting out before dawn, to ensure avoiding thunderstorms. A year later, Woodmency remembers the forecast that day. All week he expected that day to be the worst in thunderstorms, but at 7 a.m. nothing showed on his radar. It wasnt until mid-morning that thunderstorms began popping up southwest of the Grand. Those storms made their way to the Grand by 10 a.m. and peaked between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., dispensing, dissipating and then regenerating. You wouldnt have had a clue they were forming at 9 a.m., he said. Unfortunately for the climbers, by then they were already on the mountain. It does what it feels like People often, incorrectly, think of lightning like a current from a household appliance that burns the skin. But the physics are different, said Mary Ann Cooper, a lightning expert and professor emerita in the department of emergency medicine and bioengineering at the University of Illinois-Chicago. Lightnings energy is so strong it is within the body for a moment before the energy escapes, engulfing the person. Lightning is not around enough to cause skin injury, she said. Instead, the energy heats up the sweat accumulated on skin or the detailing on clothing, and that causes the burns. Lightning rarely directly strikes a person, but instead travels through the ground, ricochets off rocks and trees or concusses the air in a blast of energy, Gookin said. It hits only up to 5 percent of those injured, but the force can hurl people, breaking bones. The energy causes confusion, unconsciousness, paralysis, amnesia and ruptured ear drums. Long-term disabilities can follow: chronic pain, short-term memory loss, personality change, sleep problems and an inability to process information. Lightning affects each person differently. For all the rules  stay inside when you hear thunder, wait 30 extra minutes after lightning clears  sometimes nothing can be done to prevent a strike. Lightning is capricious, Cooper said. It does what it feels like doing. The most intense pain ever People often ask Walker what it feels like to be struck by lightning. The closest he can come to describing it is the way your foot goes uncomfortably numb when it falls asleep. Walker and his party found themselves suddenly in a storm of snow and sleet. Climbing last to a ledge, he couldnt see his group. When he arrived, he felt the sting of electricity on the left side of his body and head. It felt like I touched an electric wire, he said. The group pushed its gear away as it began to hum. The scent of burned clothing and flesh wafted in the air. The air buzzed, and then the lightning would hit. I was wondering which of these strikes was going to be the one to do us in, Walker said. Walker didnt feel the burns. He noticed at one point he couldnt feel his right leg at all. It wouldnt be until hed been brought to the lower saddle and his boot taken off that hed seen the sock blown apart and his wounded foot. Smith wouldnt find out where she was burned, either, until hours after the first strike when she was in the hospital, her clothes finally removed so she could see. The big blasts, three or four that hit her, seared her entire body, paralyzing it with pain. Its the most intense pain ever, she said. It involves the whole body and it doesnt stop. The other smaller strikes, another three or four, were like cattle prodding, localized heat burning her flesh. Smith couldnt move from the neck down. Even without the motion there was still pain. She knew she didnt have a spinal injury because she felt the pain. It took about 45 minutes before Smith could walk again. Even then she couldnt fully use her arms. When the storm passed, the thunder gone and the air free of electricity, the group began to move. Kline used his memorization from the guide book to lead the group to the rappels on the Owen-Spaulding route. He stayed focused, moving the group along, making them shake their arms to get them working, yet he also faded in and out of coherency, sometimes asking where they were and if they were on the Grand Teton. Then he would snap back and tell them how to get off the mountain. At the rappel they met Bowers. It was just the most incredible feeling, knowing you are not alone on the mountain, Smith said. Moments before, Smith was 100 percent sure she was going to die. Seeing Bowers gave her hope; maybe she would make it off the mountain yet. Off the mountain In the Tetons there are some rescues that become legend, perhaps for the novelty of missions, or maybe the danger, or because of the improvising that occurs. When the last of the victims was safely on the valley floor, Park Service staff realized this rescue would become one of those notable endeavors, simply because of the size. The rescue that day took more than 90 personnel, the agency reported. The logistics behind that are phenomenal and kind of overwhelming, Harder said. Heart landed at Lupine Meadows at pumpkin time, right as the light dwindled to the point he couldnt fly anymore. For the rangers, the impact didnt hit until it was all over. It just seemed like any other rescue, Heart said. Just really long. Heart ferried or short-hauled all 17 rescued climbers off the mountain that day. When they said the mountain is clear, that was a good feeling, McConnell said. With the risk eliminated, it gave the climbers a chance to reflect on the day and realize how big it had been. They saw how many people had come together to make the rescue happen. You felt like one little piece of this incredible machine, McConnell said. For the victims, it wasnt over until they were on the ground. Because of weather, rescuers talked about staying overnight at the lower saddle, a thought Walker dreaded. The short haul to the valley floor is still one of the coolest rides Ive ever taken, Walker said. It meant it was over. I love the mountains When Smith arrived at St. Johns Medical Center in Jackson, she still couldnt feel her arms. Her plastic watch she bought for about $12.99 melted deep into her wrist, leaving third-degree burns. It seared through the skin all the way to the fatty tissue. To get it out, doctors cut the tendon and muscles. The watch still worked. The only part of her body that didnt hurt was her ring finger, which was splayed open like a hot-poker had flayed it. Exploded is the only real good way to explain it, she said. No one knows for sure what happened to the finger. Doctors said they could try to save it, but it would take multiple surgeries and thered be no guarantee. She told them to cut it off. When they did, they found no living tissue. They couldnt have saved it anyway. Smith had 10 small burns on her body from her heel to her thigh, to her wrist to her elbow to her shoulder. Shortly after the accident, Smith talked of plans about going back to school. She moved to Connecticut from Bozeman, Mont., a few months ago to pursue a nursing degree. Even soon after the accident, Smith didnt hesitate about returning to the mountains. I think my weather window is going to expand, she said. But I will definitely be back in the mountains. I love the mountains. Smith has been back in the mountains, Walker said. As has Kline, who started climbing only a few weeks after the accident and is working on getting his EMT certification and would one day like to become a rescuer, like the Jenny Lake climbing rangers, Walker said. Walker wasnt sure if Larson, who is now in medical school in Berkeley, Calif., has climbed again. While Walker thinks about the accident every day, it left no lasting injuries other than a few crazy-looking scars. It didnt deter him from the mountains, although it did humble him. Walker himself lives in Indiana and didnt climb again until last Sunday. It felt so good to get back in the harness and on the rope, he said. I kind of forgot how much I love climbing. Read more: http://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/article_b1ca5efa-3d6d-5dc8-822a-e712229323fe.html#ixzz1TDB80Wnz
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 4 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 8 of 16 climbers  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 2 of 16  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
GRAND TETON NAT'L PARK, WY - A lightning storm struck the mountains in Grand Teton National Park Wednesday, injuring 16 climbers and prompting a helicopter rescue effort to try to bring them down. Rangers hanging by rope from helicopters, plucked 11 climbers of the mountain, but had to leave five more when another storm blew in. The climbers were above 12,000 feet on Grand Teton Mountain when the storm hit at mid-day.
Wed, 07/21/2010 12:00 AM Injured 1 of 16  0.0  Grand Teton National Park WY 
 USA 
  mountain climbing  N/A  Ground Strike,Mtn. Climbing,Outside 
Rangers Rescue Climbers In Grand Teton National Park By Local News 8 POSTED: 5:03 pm MDT July 21, 2010 UPDATED: 9:23 pm MDT July 21, 2010 GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. -- Rangers in Grand Teton National Park were able to rescue 16 injured climbers who were caught in a lightning storm on Wednesday afternoon. As of 9:10 p.m. on Wednesday, all 16 climbers had been taken off the mountain and were being transported to St. John's Hospital in Jackson. Emergency room doctors tell Local News 8 all the climbers were in stable condition Wednesday night. They had varying degrees of lightning burns. The doctors say some of the climbers were struck multiple times. Some were thrown when they were hit. Rescuers were hanging from ropes to reach the climbers. They had to put each climber onto a litter, which was flown to a flat area of the mountain, before the climber was put into the helicopter to get to the hospital. Two helicopters assisted in the rescue as well as other agencies assisting the rangers.

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