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07/31/2008 12:00 PM Killed 2 killed, 6 injured @ soccer match  0.0  Mexico City  
 Mexico 
  playing in soccer game    Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Stormy Weather 
Fri Aug 1, 10:21 PM ET MEXICO CITY - Police say a lightning bolt has struck a soccer match between firefighters and civil protection workers in southern Mexico, killing two and injuring six. Authorities say one player from each side died during Friday's local match in the southern state of Guerrero. Mexican news media reported that the game went ahead despite reports of electrical storms in the area. The injured were being treated at hospitals for second-degree burns.
07/31/2008 07:15 PM Injured 1 of 2   0.0  Sioux Falls SD 
 USA 
am not pm  working on road crew    Construction site,Outside,Road 
Lightning strike sends two to hospital Construction workers injured in 'near miss' as storms raise havoc Thom Gabrukiewicz • Elizabeth Gorder • August 1, 2008 Print this page E-mail this article Share this article: Del.icio.us Facebook Digg Reddit Newsvine What’s this? Severe weather that rolled across South Dakota and Minnesota on Thursday sent two construction workers to the hospital - where one remained Thursday afternoon - after lightning struck a road construction site in east Sioux Falls. Elsewhere in South Dakota, severe weather downed trees and power lines and tossed ski boats and farmers' water tanks. In east Sioux Falls, two workers employed by Runge Enterprises Inc. of Sioux Falls were just beginning their shift when the lightning struck about 7:15 a.m. The men's names were not released. "It was a near miss; it didn't hit them directly," said Jim Sideras, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue division chief. One firetruck and an ambulance responded to the scene. There were about a dozen workers at the job site as the storm passed, said Ryan Gulbrandson, a construction foreman with T & R Contracting of Sioux Falls. The lightning strike occurred near the intersection of East 26th Street and South Dakota Highway 11. "I was about a half-mile away from where it happened, at another part of the job site," Gulbrandson said. "I didn't see it. I saw some bolts." The entire construction site is on South Dakota 11 from about 2,000 feet south of 26th Street to South Dakota 42. Gulbrandson said he told his workers to get into their trucks when the lightning began. Workers were back on the job under a sunny sky Thursday afternoon, driving graders and dump trucks and pounding metal spikes into the roadway before paving. "We don't send guys home, but you don't want to be around (lightning)," Gulbrandson said. Phone messages with Runge Enterprises were not returned There have been 23 deaths from lightning strikes in the U.S. in 2008, said meteorologist Todd Heitkamp of the National Weather Service in Sioux Falls. There were 45 such deaths in 2007. The closest lightning fatality to Sioux Falls this year was in Curlew, Iowa. "If you can hear thunder, you're close enough to the storm to be struck by lightning," Heitkamp said. "That's when you need to start taking safety precautions and minimize the amount of activities you're doing outside." The odds of being struck by lightning in your lifetime are 1 in 5,000, according to the NWS. The odds of being struck in any given year: 1 in 700,000. "It's something that people need to take seriously," Heitkamp said. "Avoid being the tallest object, avoid any metal object, stay indoors." Elsewhere in South Dakota, the National Weather Service recorded a gust of 101 mph at the Aberdeen landfill. In Webster, a lumber yard and cabinet shop were reported damaged. Officials said a tree fell on a cabin at Buster's Resort near Webster. Brown County emergency management officials reported some house fires because of downed power lines. Burdette Zastrow, who lives on Pickerel Lake about 25 miles from Webster, said shingles were ripped from her roof, but some of her neighbors suffered even more damage. "A ski boat and lift are completely missing, another neighbor's pontoon is missing, and another neighbor's pontoon is upside down and his jet ski is gone," Zastrow said. At Pickerel Lake State Park, 50- to 60-foot-tall cottonwoods were felled and large, round hay bales were moved as much as 700 yards by the high winds, the NWS said. Zastrow said a nearby farmer lost an 8,000-gallon water tank that was found in a valley after it had been blown across a field. U.S. Highway 12 was closed for a short time near Rush Lake because a semi truck had blown over, according to the Day County Sheriff's office. At Columbia, in Brown County, officials reported that the old school gym was destroyed in the storm, and a tree went through the roof of a house. Other reports were of trees falling on houses and cars in the area. Reach Thom Gabrukiewicz at 331-2320. Reach Elizabeth Gorder at 331-2326. The Associated Press contributed to this report.
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 8 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard    During the storm,Near Trees,Orchard,Outside,Taking Shelter 
07/29/2008 06:00 PM Injured 1 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard  N/A  Farming,Near Trees,Orchard,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tree,Walking,Walking to Vehicle 
Eight injured in Upstate orchard lightning strike Posted: July 30, 2008 08:46 AM Updated: July 30, 2008 08:46 AM SPARTANBURG, SC (AP) - Authorities say eight men suffered minor injuries after lightning struck the ground in a Spartanburg County peach orchard. Cooley Springs-Fingerville Fire Department Assistant Chief Tony Phillips told the Herald-Journal of Spartanburg the men sought shelter Tuesday evening as a storm gathered. Phillips says the bolt struck the dirt at the men's feet, knocking them to the ground. Phillips says most of the men suffered minor burns, blisters on their feet or tingling. He says a few struggled to stand. Orchard owner James Cooley says the men were up and talking a few hours after they were struck and are all expected to recover.
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 2 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard    Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Walking to Vehicle 
SPARTANBURG, S.C. -- Severe storms and frequent lightning damaged buildings and injured workers on the ground Tuesday night. One lightning strike sent six people to the hospital in Spartanburg, medics said. Rescue crews said the strike happened at about 6:20 p.m. at an orchard on Burnett Road. Officers said that about 30 men were picking peaches in the field when the storm came over them. They tried to get into a nearby van for protection, but a bolt of lightning struck the ground near them, workers said. Six of the men were taken to Spartanburg Regional Medical with non-life-threatening injuries. The victims suffered pain to their legs including burns and blistering to their feet, doctors said. At 10 p.m. another lightning strike started a house fire on Frost-Berry Court in Fountain Inn. Officials said the fire started on the roof of the house. They said neighbors saw the flames and ran to tell the couple inside that their house was on fire. The flames burned through the roof and into the attic. The rest of the home sustained extensive water damage. In Marietta an apparent microburst of wind knocked the roof off a Texaco convenience store and downed trees nearby. WYFF 4 Meteorologist Dale Gilbert said that afternoon temperatures in the mid-90s could spawn more storms on Wednesday and Thursday.
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 3 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in an orchard    Near Trees,Outside 
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 4 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in an orchard    During the storm,Farming,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter 
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 5 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard    During the storm,Near Trees,Orchard,Outside,Taking Shelter 
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 6 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard    During the storm,Near Trees,Orchard,Outside,Taking Shelter 
07/29/2008 07:15 PM Injured 2 of 2   0.0  Sioux Falls SD 
 USA 
am not pm  working on road crew    Construction site,Outside,Road 
see 1 of 2
07/29/2008 06:20 PM Injured 7 of 8 in orchard  0.0  Spartanburg SC 
 USA 
  in peach orchard    During the storm,Near Trees,Orchard,Outside,Taking Shelter 
07/28/2008 12:00 PM Injured Brandon Smith  0.0  Warner Robins Ga  
 USA 
  in patrol car    In a car,Police Officer 
reprint or licenseprint email Digg itdel.icio.usAIM WR officer recounts brush with lightning as severe storms hit area By Becky Purser - bpurser@macon.com DANNY GILLELAND/THE TELEGRAPH Warner Robins police officer Brandon Smith kneels next to where lightning struck the McConnell-Talbert Stadium parking lot Monday. The hole already had been filled in. Smith, who was in the lot during the storm, was not hurt. Storms cause damage in Warner Robins WARNER ROBINS --Police officer Brandon Smith recalled the hair on his arms was standing straight up just moments before a lightning bolt blasted the pavement next to his patrol car Monday evening. "I'd looked down at my arms and thought, 'That's weird,' and then, 'POW!' " Smith said Tuesday as he recounted his brush with lightning from the severe storms that roared through the city the night before. "It sounded like a shotgun blast going off." The 27-year-old officer said his feet were knocked up into his lap, placing him almost into a fetal position. Startled and stunned, he started to drive out of parking space No. 388 at McConnell-Talbert Stadium on South Davis Drive. Smith, who's been on the police force for three years, drove himself to the emergency room. He didn't notice the cramping in his left side until he climbed out of the car. The ER doctors and nurses checked him out, finding only that his blood pressure was slightly elevated. "It scared me - startled me - more than anything," the officer said. While Smith escaped serious injury, his patrol car didn't fare as well. It was sent to the shop after the dashboard lights "all started coming on in strange and different ways," police Maj. John Wagner said. At the height of Monday's storm, which downed tree limbs, left more than 3,000 Flint Energies customers without power and damaged some businesses, Smith had pulled into the stadium's parking lot. Rain and hail were pelting his police car, strong winds were blowing, thunder rumbled as lightning flashed. Smith said he thought he was protecting his police car from being hit by a falling tree limb or falling power line by parking out in the open. "But the lighting found me," he said. Coincidentally, Police Maj. Harry Dennard and his wife were on their way home from dinner and had just passed the officer's police car when the lightning struck. "It was just a horrendous boom and flash," Dennard recalled. "The ground shook." In addition to lightning, the storms produced high winds that yanked off the facade at Town and Country Motorsports and tore down parts of the concrete walls of the Audio Shop. Both businesses are on Carl Vinson Parkway in Warner Robins. "It looks like the wind just bear-hugged the back of the building and worked its way around," said Brenda Merrill, bookkeeper for Audio Shop at 596 Carl Vinson Parkway. "It looks like lightning hit the building or a small tornado." Watching the store's video of the storm was surreal, she said. "It's eerie," Merrill said. "It shows a bunch of wind and rain. All of a sudden, it goes black." The alarm company first contacted store officials Monday night, reporting that motion sensors had detected movement inside the building, Merrill said. The next call was that firefighters were on the scene and there was a fire. It turned out that the building had not caught fire but the roof was gone, she said. The business suffered water damage and three of the employees spent the night on site, Merrill said. At Town & Country Motorsports at 581 Carl Vinson Parkway, the facade was twisted and bent, and some inventory was damaged by rain, reported office manager Shannon Peavy. She was at the family business Monday night cleaning up after the storm. But she considered the damage to the motorcycle dealership minor compared to what happened across the street at the Audio Shop. The violent ripple of storms claimed the roof of a mobile home on Feagin Mill Road and the roof of a mobile classroom at the Hodac social service agency at 2762 Watson Blvd., said Houston County EMA Director Jimmy Williams. Strong winds also ripped off the traffic light at Carl Vinson Parkway and Watson Boulevard, Wagner said. During and immediately after the storms raked the area, several traffic lights were without power or had to be reset, leaving police to move traffic through the intersection, the major said. Warner Robins City Hall was closed Tuesday after the air conditioning went out, possibly from a lightning strike, Wagner said. "They're about 99 percent sure it was lightning," he said. Flint spokesman Jimmy Autry said 3,210 customers lost electrical power during the storm. Only 38 remained without electricity as of 7:30 a.m. Tuesday and less than 15 were without power by noon Tuesday, Autry said. Crews worked through Monday night on downed lines, blown fuses and other problems, with outages mostly confined to the north side of Warner Robins and the area near Holiday Riviera mobile home park, he said. Another 73 customers lost power just before 2 p.m. Tuesday, likely from damage caused by a fallen tree limb, Autry said. The storms cut through southern Bibb and north Houston counties starting about 7 p.m. Monday, dumping 1.62 inches of rain at the Middle Georgia Regional Airport and pelting parts of Centerville and Warner Robins with hail. Houston County Operations Director Tommy Stalnaker said crews were dispatched Monday night to clear roads from downed trees. All roads were clear as of 5 a.m., according to Houston County 911. "We didn't have what the city had," sheriff's Capt. Robert West said. "The city got the brunt of it." While the National Weather Service received reports of large hail, Centerville police Capt. Garrett Cooley said most of what was reported to police were power outages and downed tree limbs. In Perry, police Capt. Bill Phelps said that while dark clouds swirled ominously over the city, Perry for the most part escaped the severe weather. "We didn't get hit," Phelps said. "As a matter of fact, our sirens went off but it never materialized." Staff writers Liz Fabian and Wayne Crenshaw contributed to this report. To contact writer Becky Purser, call 923-3109, extension 243.
07/28/2008 12:00 PM Killed shepherd  23.0  Creede Co  
 USA 
  on a mule    Outside 
07/27/2008 12:01 PM Injured man 3 of 3   33.0  Sandy Hook NJ 
 USA 
  on beach   N/A  Beach,Near Water,Outside,Water 
see 1 of 3
07/27/2008 01:30 PM Injured person   0.0  Cape May NJ 
 USA 
  at Morey's Pier    Dock/Pier/Jetty,Near Water,Outside 
A fourth person was reported to be struck on Morey's Pier. Another.reportedly struck at Beachcomber Campground in Erma.
07/27/2008 10:01 AM Injured 3 of 5 men  26.0  Hicksville NY 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game  N/A  Burnt,Field,Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
Text size: 3 SEVERELY BURNED IN HICKSVILLE LIGHTNING STRIKE Tips for staying safe from lightning strikes BY MICHAEL AMON | michael.amon@newsday.com; Emer July 28, 2008 The second half of the soccer match at Cantiague Park in Hicksville had just started yesterday when there was a sudden flash of lightning and then anguished screams. One of the players, Henry Ramos, ran toward the crying men and found three of them on fire, their shoes melting, skin falling off their legs. "I've never seen something like this," said Ramos, 30, of Hempstead. The three were being treated for severe burns yesterday at Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow after lightning struck a tree under which they had taken shelter as the rain picked up during a league soccer match, authorities said. The men, whom authorities did not identify, were in their 20s and 30s, friends said. Related links 5 Struck by Lightning Photo Lightning storm hits Long Island Photos Weather disrupts LIRR service Live: Flight delays Latest forecast Web link: LIPA Outage Updates Nassau traffic cam Suffolk traffic cam Rainy day recommendations Traffic alerts Five injured by lightning strike at Hicksville park Nassau's DWI arrests from July View the 'wall of shame' photo gallery >> Local Police Mugshots View police mugshot photo gallery >> Car accidents on LI View car accident gallery >> Notable deaths • Celebrity photos Photos of the Day View photos of the day gallery >> Newsday's LI Newsmap See what's going on in and around your area >> A fourth man suffered less severe burns. Another, a player in the match who was resting, had muscle strains, Ramos said. The lightning struck just before 10:20 a.m., tearing branches from a tree at the south end of the soccer field. It came just as severe thunderstorms increased in intensity across Long Island, knocking out power to thousands and downing trees. "It was an unfortunate act of nature," said Jose Lopez, commissioner of Nassau County parks. He ordered the evacuation of Cantiague Park. The lightning strike was a horrific disruption of the injured men's Sunday morning ritual of watching league soccer games at the park, friends said. Lopez said the soccer leagues are a popular spectator sport for area Latino families, who often bring picnics. One of the burned men, a 26-year-old construction worker from Hempstead, had been coming to the matches every Friday and Sunday for years, said his girlfriend, who declined to identify herself or her boyfriend. The games start around 9:45 a.m. and usually he's home by noon, she said. Yesterday, she got a call that he was injured and she rushed to the hospital. She found him crying out in pain on a hospital bed, saying, "Oh my God, I can't believe this is happening to me," she said, standing outside NUMC's emergency room. She said her boyfriend had burns stretching the length of the right side of his body, from his neck to his leg. He had exposed wounds that were being treated with ointment and painkillers, she said. She had been told that he would likely be transferred from the emergency room to a burn unit. Alex Canales, who coaches one of the teams, said the lightning surprised him. The rain had been light, and no one had thought of canceling the match, he said. But Ramos said he saw several lightning strikes throughout the first half of the match, and it had worried him. Emerson Clarridge and staff writer Marc Beja contributed to this story. STAYING SAFE Forecasters say more thunderstorms could crop up today. Here's some experts' advice: STAY INDOORS. Keep away from windows and doors, don't talk on corded phones, unplug the PC and don't take a bath or shower. IF YOU'RE OUTSIDE. Try to get into a large building or at least a car with its windows rolled up. Avoid metal objects. Do not seek shelter under large trees, as they can be targets of lightning. IF LIGHTNING STRIKES NEAR YOU. Hunch down and compact your body into a ball. Earle Williams, a lightning expert at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, recommends that you keep one foot off the ground so as not to conduct electricity through your body should lightning strike the ground near you. WHEN IS IT SAFE? If about 30 minutes have passed since the last thunderclap. Experts say that if you can hear thunder, you can be in danger from lightning. SOURCE: National Weather Service, Earle Williams of MIT
07/27/2008 12:01 AM Injured woman 2 of 3   33.0  Sandy Hook NJ 
 USA 
  on beach   N/A  Beach,Near Water,Outside,Water 
SANDY HOOK, NJ (WABC) -- The National Park Service says a man is dead and two other people are injured after a lightning strike on the beach in Sandy Hook. Park service spokesman Brian Feeney says the lightning strike at about noon Sunday was on a beach where swimming isn't allowed. That means there weren't even lifeguards to raise the alarm as a fast-moving severe thunderstorm swept into the area. Feeney said one man in his 40s was dead. And a man and woman in their 30s were taken to Monmouth Medical Center in Long Branch. Feeney declined to immediately release the names of the dead and injured and didn't immediately have more details. Story continues below
07/27/2008 01:30 PM Injured Sang Jough  40.0  Tanglewood Ma 
 USA 
  seeking shelter holding an umbrella  N/A  Festival,Outside,Taking Shelter,Umbrella 
Tanglewood patron struck by lightning By Jack Dew and Derek Gentile, Berkshire Eagle Staff Article Last Updated: 07/28/2008 06:18:26 AM EDT Monday, July 28 LENOX — A Tanglewood patron was struck by lighting and rushed to Berkshire Medical Center yesterday as a powerful pair of storms crashed through South County. The man — whose age, identity and condition were not released yesterday — was among the early arrivals waiting to see the Orchestra of St. Luke's perform Tower, Mendelssohn and Beethoven when the first storm hit shortly after 1 p.m. Bernadette Horgan, a spokeswoman for the Boston Symphony Orchestra, said Tanglewood officials were keeping a close eye on the storm. As it approached, they sent deputy sheriffs to warn the crowd to seek shelter in the Shed and the nearby Ozawa concert hall. But the man was apparently struck by a bolt of lighting before he could seek shelter. Sheriffs rushed to his side and an ambulance — already on standby — arrived within minutes, Horgan said. The man was rushed to Berkshire Medical Center, but no information on his condition was available yesterday. Horgan said the normal storm protocol was followed as it should have been. Officials closed the grounds to newcomers and asked patrons to wait out the storm in the shelter of the Shed. Concertgoers who arrived after the gates had been shut huddled from the pounding rain under the roof of the main gate and watched as lighting popped on the horizon and thunder shook the air. "That's pretty frightening," said Kathy Hanson, of New Advertisement Jersey. Most of the crowd waited patiently for the show to go on. Winston Bath, of Hudson, N.Y., said "they must be (delaying) it for a good reason." Casting an eye at the storm clouds, he shrugged and said, "It's just summer in the Berkshires." Tom Wasula, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service based in Albany, N.Y., said two storms formed on the front-edge of a cold front in New York and barreled eastward, bringing quarter-sized hail to Becket and Otis and felling trees in its path. From about 1 to 2:30 p.m., lightning struck the ground at a rate of almost 100 strikes every 15 minutes in South County, Wasula said. Emergency crews in Otis, Becket, Monterey, Stockbridge and Great Barrington responded to lightning strikes in those communities. Most of the strikes hit trees, but in Stockbridge, the lightning struck a transformer on Ice Glen Road, causing it to ignite briefly before being extinguished. In Housatonic, resident Henry Lawrence, of High Street, reported that high winds and stormy conditions brought down several trees on his street. A downed tree crashed onto his deck, said Lawrence, while a second tree fell onto a building owned by a neighbor. In Egremont, a fire truck was involved in a collision on Creamery Road while responding to an alarm at the height of the storm, according to police Chief Reena Bucknell. The driver of the second vehicle, a Volvo, had to be extricated from the vehicle and was transported to BMC. The driver of the fire truck was transported to Fairview Hospital, Bucknell said. The drivers' identities and conditions were not released. No one else was in either vehicle. Numerous state and local agencies responded to the call. In Pittsfield, lightning struck a small shed on South Street, setting it on fire. The Fire Department was able to quickly extinguish the flames. By about 2:30 p.m., the worst of the storms had passed and Tanglewood opened its gates. Staff hurried the crowd inside and urged everyone to the Shed. At about the same time, a deputy sheriff carried a mauled umbrella, its red-and-white nylon panels twisted around and in on themselves. He put it in the back of a patrol car and confirmed that the injured man had been holding the umbrella when he was apparently struck by lightning. Lightning safety Seek shelter when you first hear thunder, see dark threatening clouds or see lightning. The safest place is a building that's fully enclosed with a roof, walls and floor. The second-safest location is a hard-topped vehicle. If no safe location is nearby: Do not seek shelter under tall, isolated trees and stay away from tall objects. Sheds, carports, picnic shelters and the like are not safe shelters. Stay away from metal objects. SOURCE: National Weather Service Monday, July 28 LENOX — Police have identified the man struck by lightning yesterday at Tanglewood as a 40-year-old New Jersey man. Sang Jough of Westwood, N.J., was brought to Berkshire Medical Center in Pittsfield shortly after the 1:30 p.m. incident, and he was then transferred to another hospital, according to hospital spokesman Mike Leary. Leary could not release information about Jough's condition, or to which hospital he was transported. Jough was waiting to see the Orchestra of St. Luke's perform Tower, Mendelssohn and Beethoven yesterday when a powerful thunderstorm swept through South County. As the storm approached the Tanglewood grounds, deputy sheriffs on duty at the concert warned the crowd to seek shelter in the Shed and the Ozawa concert hall. Jough was apparently struck by lightning before he could take shelter, and he was holding an umbrella at the time of the accident, according to reports. Jough was hurrying toward the Shed with his wife and two children when he was struck, according to Doris Bloom, a Tanglewood usher who lives in Becket during the summer. Bloom said said she was walking through the entrance gate when she heard a "very loud crack." "It was very scary," she said. "He was standing only a few feet in front of me. I'd never heard a sound like that in my life." Bloom said paramedics were on the scene almost immediately, and Jough was given CPR before Advertisement he was taken away in the ambulance. To reach Jessica Willis: jwillis@berkshireeagle.com, (413) 528-3660. Man recounts Tanglewood lightning strike By Jessica Willis, Berkshire Eagle Staff Article Last Updated: 08/07/2008 07:54:06 AM EDT Thursday, August 07 He remembers nothing: No sound, no sensation, no blinding flash of light. At one moment, Sang Jough was rushing through the Tanglewood gate in the middle of a downpour, heading toward the Shed with his wife and two young children. And the next, he was gone. When Jough regained consciousness, he was in an ambulance. "The emergency medical technician saw me open my eyes," Jough said yesterday, during a telephone interview from his home in Westwood, N.J. "I asked him, 'What the hell happened to me?' He told me I had been struck by lightning. I said, 'No way.' " In the 11 days since Jough was struck by a bolt of lightning that evidently entered through his right shoulder and blasted out of his left knee, the 40-year-old has had time to replay the fateful afternoon of Sunday, July 27 — and wonder if there was anything he could have done to avoid what happened. "It's too late to play Monday morning quarterback," Jough said. "It got me, and it got me good." Before he walked out onto Tanglewood's lawn, Jough was just another concertgoer trying to stay dry in a heavy rainstorm. The family had driven up to the Berkshires for the day, and after lunch in Lenox — Jough can't remember where they ate, only that it was a good meal — they headed to the concert. "We were early," Jough said. "And trying to find ways to kill time." It was their first trip to Tanglewood, and the Joughs Advertisement were very excited to hear the Orchestra of St. Luke's perform works by Tower, Mendelssohn and Beethoven. They were particularly eager to hear violinist Sarah Chang, who was accompanying the orchestra. "I feel let down," Jough said. "I didn't even make it to my seat." It started to pour as they were getting out of the car, and Mari, Jough's wife, wanted to stay in the car and wait it out. Jough nixed the idea, and said they should run for it. "That was mistake number one," he mused. Mistake No. 2, Jough added, was the golf umbrella — something he rarely brought on trips, because son Peter, 10, and daughter Sarah, 7, tended to fight over who got to carry it. But for some reason, Jough grabbed it, and he still doesn't know why. It was a few minutes before 1:30 p.m. The line at the main gate was "overwhelming," Jough said, so they went through the student gate to the left. He took the umbrella from his son. They hurried across the grass. And then he blacked out. In an earlier interview with The Eagle, Mari, his wife, had described a "sound of thunder (coming) down in front of me," and in the next instant, her husband was lying on his face, with his head smoking. "She screamed for help and tried to lift me," Jough said. "I was a 190-pound dead guy." Jough wasn't exaggerating; he was in cardiac arrest and he had stopped breathing. Emergency responders used defibrillator pads to shock his heart back into action. In the days that followed, after he had been transported via helicopter to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla, N.Y., his burn unit specialist told Jough that he should be grateful. "He said, 'Thank yourself for being alive, because you were dead for five minutes,' Jough said. "And he also told me to thank Berkshire Medical Center." In the immediate aftermath of the lightning strike, Jough received emergency treatment at BMC, and Jough said the Pittsfield hospital's fast work saved his life. Maybe his luck would hold. "I guess I gotta buy a lottery ticket now," Jough said wryly. He went home last Thursday where, he said, it has been difficult getting adjusted. His right eardrum was ruptured in the blast, and he has partial hearing loss. There's a persistent ringing in his ears, and his sense of smell has been compromised. Every now and then, he loses his balance and falls down. "From the waist down, I still feel like there's electricity flowing through me, and my legs are still throbbing," Jough said. He also has a deep, sunburn-like scar across his chest, shaped like a lightning bolt, appropriately enough. Doctors said his eardrum will repair itself, but there might be other complications later on: Jough might need cataract surgery — lightning-strike victims' eyes are often damaged by the sudden, searing heat of the bolt — and he might have sustained a spinal injury. "(Doctors) told me at any given time my back might go out," he said. While Mari is at work at an investment bank in New York City, Jough has been hanging out at home, meeting with the family's pastor, taking "power naps," reading the Bible, and watching television. And going stir crazy. Up until his meeting with the bolt of lightning, Jough, who is a real estate agent, was taking courses for his real estate broker's license. He said he will most likely return to school next week. "As for work, I don't know," Jough said. "I've been letting my clients know what happened to me." And as for a return to the Berkshires? Jough has family in Westfield, so he had visited the area before. But Mari said her trip to the Berkshires was her first — and last. Indeed, the trip left a bad taste in his mouth. Jough said the helicopter service that transported him from BMC to Westchester sent him a bill for $3,000 — apparently his insurance didn't cover the transport — and the couple would like their ticket money refunded. "Mari said she never wants to go back," he said. "It kind of broke my heart. I love Massachusetts. But she feels like the place owes me one." To reach Jessica Willis: jwillis@berkshireeagle.com, (413) 528-3660.
07/27/2008 12:01 AM Killed Pablo Garciaman 1 of 3   38.0  Sandy Hook NJ 
 USA 
  on beach   N/A  Beach,Near Water,Outside,Park,Water 
Jul 27, 2008 2:18 pm US/Eastern Digg | Facebook | E-mail | Print Lightning Strikes 10 People; 1 Dead NEW YORK (CBS) ― One man died, while nine others are injured after being struck by lightning in various parts of the tri-state area. A man is dead and four other people are injured after a lightning strike on the beach in Sandy Hook. National Park Service spokesman Brian Feeney says the lightning strike at about noon Sunday was on a beach where swimming isn't allowed. That means there weren't even lifeguards to raise the alarm as a fast-moving severe thunderstorm swept into the area. Feeney said one man in his 40s was dead. Five people were struck by lightning on Long Island. The group was playing soccer in Hicksville when they were caught off guard by powerful thunderstorms. The victims, all in their 20s, sought shelter under a tree. Authorities cannot confirm the severity of their injuries, but they are not thought to be life threatening. A house in Ulster County was also struck by lightning. There are no reports of injuries at this time.
07/27/2008 01:15 PM Injured teenager on beach  0.0  Cape May NJ 
 USA 
  on a beach holding an umbrella  N/A  Beach,Near Water,Outside,Umbrella,Water 
Man Struck by Lightning on Cape May Beach Accidents | 3 hours 19 min ago | Comments 2 By Al Campbell CAPE MAY -- An unidentified male was believed to have been struck by lightning at 1:15 p.m. July 27 on a Cape May beach. A Herald reporter, on the beach at the time, said the thunderstorm came up very quickly and was very intense. The police scanner stated that the victim was conscious and alert after the incident, although officials closed and cleared the beaches here until the storm passed. Medic 5 and Cape May Fire Rescue transported the victim to Cape Regional Medical Center for treatment. A severe thunderstorm alert is in effect for Cape May County and other parts of the region until 8 p.m. July 27. No further information was available.
07/27/2008 01:15 PM Injured Jack Lindeman (Lifeguard)  19.0  Cape May NJ 
 USA 
  clearing the beach  N/A  Beach,Near Water,Outside,Water 
Lifeguard Struck By Lightning Lifeguard, Teen Girl Hurt POSTED: 3:15 pm EDT July 27, 2008 UPDATED: 3:24 pm EDT July 27, 2008 CAPE MAY, N.J. -- A lifeguard on Cape May was struck by lightning Sunday afternoon as he tried to clear the beach when storms moved in. A teenager holding an umbrella also suffered injuries to the hand as storms struck about 1:15 p.m. The lifeguard's condition was unknown, but he was conscious as he was taken to the hospital, police said. Rain, hail, high winds and dangerous lightning created problems in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York on Sunday. Severe thunderstorm watches were in effect through 8 p.m. In Sandy Hook, N.J., one person was killed and another injured when lightning struck the beach. The National Weather Service warned that the storm system is dangerous, packing damaging winds, destructive hail and deadly lightning. "People should move [inside] to shelter, preferably inside a strong building but away from windows," the service said. Explore More: Find out more about Weather, or try these articles: CAPE MAY - "It was like an explosion right over top of us." It all happened in a flash, a lightning storm lifeguards that caught members of the Cape May Beach Patrol off guard and scrambling to protect beachgoers. "We started clearing the beaches about 30 seconds later I come around to the back of the stand, then I'm standing and (next thing) I'm on the ground," says 19-year-old Jack Lindeman. Lots of people hit the deck at the loud bang, but not like Lindeman, he got struck. "Right away I knew something was wrong and he was holding his head somewhat incoherent, dazed," says fellow lifeguard Ralph Atwell. Lindeman was brought off the beach and to the hospital, but miraculously, not injured. He says he felt, "A lot of pressure in the top of my head, a weird rusty metal taste in my mouth." Weather Watchers counted 32,000 lightning strikes throughout New Jersey yesterday. Several people were struck including a girl also in Cape May who was hospitalized and a man in Sandy Hook who died. Weather experts say don't be deceived, just because you do not hear thunder or see a storm doesn't mean there isn't lightening in the area. Thunder can only be heard up to 4 miles from a storm but lightening can strike up to 10 miles away. Lindeman says, "Get off the beach as soon as possible, forget your stuff you can come back and get it later." Sometimes creating temperatures hotter than the sun's surface, not everyone walks away from lightning strikes. "I just, I never even thought it would happen to me it just completely took me by surprise," says Lindeman, "Hopefully it doesn't happen again." Lindeman is now already back to work is a bit of a local celebrity, with some new nicknames. "Lightning Jack, jack flash," says Lindeman, "Sparky, I think is the one that's going to stick that's the one I've heard the most. I've gotten that fine just about everyday, including my family."
07/27/2008 12:01 AM Injured 4 of 5 men   0.0  Hicksville NY 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game    Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Under Trees 
07/27/2008 01:30 PM Injured person   0.0  Cape May NJ 
 USA 
  at Campground    Camping,Outside 
A fourth person was reported to be struck on Morey's Pier. Another.reportedly struck at Beachcomber Campground in Erma.
07/27/2008 12:01 AM Injured Elber Guerra (5 of 5 men)   0.0  Hicksville NY 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game  N/A  Burnt,Field,Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
JULY 29, 2008 Lightning Strike Victim: "My Shoe Exploded" Some of the victims struck by lightning on Sunday spoke to Newsday about their ordeal, with one describing how, "The lightning came out of my body through the foot, and my shoe exploded." A group of men who had been playing and watching soccer in a Hicksville park took shelter under a tree during the storm. But lightning struck, injuring five men. Elber Guerra has second- and third-degree burns on 35% of his body (his clothes caught fire) while Rene Castro has less severe burns; three others were released. Guerra doesn't remember being struck, but said his friends told him he "was choking on my tongue, with blood coming out of my mouth. They had to open my clenched teeth to get the tongue." ews flash — He's 'okay' after lightning strike Elber Guerra was simply playing soccer with friends when a bolt from above changed his life. As skies opened that day in July 2008, Guerra, 38, and his buddies huddled for cover under a tree. Suddenly, Guerra and his friend, 31-year-old Rene Castro, were on the ground, struck by lightning. "I don't remember much," he said outside his Hempstead, L.I., home. "I remember walking under the tree. .  .  . Next thing I know, I woke up at the hospital." Guerra vaguely remembers the lightning going through him, striking his foot and exploding his shoe. He suffered second- and third-degree burns over 35 to 40% of his body — including part of his face, legs and back — when his clothes caught on fire. It took him weeks to regain movement in his arms and legs after leaving Nassau University Medical Center's Burn Center. "I felt weak for a long time, like two months. I could not really move my arms and legs, but now I am okay," said Guerra, a bakery delivery worker who lives with his wife. "I live a normal life now. Everything is okay." Guerra, whose friend Castro also survived, said his physical scars have faded, but he'll never enjoy a storm again, always fearing lightning will strike twice. "Now whenever I hear rain and thunder, I get nervous. It never escapes you. It stays with you forever," he said. "I just have to live with the fear of not being hit again." cmelago@nydailynews.com
07/27/2008 01:15 PM Injured man on beach  0.0  Cape May NJ 
 USA 
  on beach     Beach,Near Water,Outside 
Lightning's Toll: Five Struck in County Accidents | 1 hour 6 min ago | Comments 2 By Al Campbell CAPE MAY -- A total of five people were reportedly struck by lightning July 27 as a fast-moving storm swept through Cape May County. An unidentified male was believed to have been struck by lightning at 1:15 p.m. July 27 on a Cape May beach, while a Cape May lifeguard was also struck, and a female holding an umbrella near the lifeguard was also hit. A fourth person was reported to be struck on Morey's Pier. Another.reportedly struck at Beachcomber Campground in Erma. A Herald reporter, on the beach at the time, said the thunderstorm came up very quickly and was very intense. The police scanner stated that the victim was conscious and alert after the incident, although officials closed and cleared the beaches here until the storm passed. Medic 5 and Cape May Fire Rescue transported the victims to Cape Regional Medical Center for treatment. A severe thunderstorm alert is in effect for Cape May County and other parts of the region until 8 p.m. July 27. None of those struck sustained life-threatening injuries, and were cared for at Cape Regional Medical Center, Court House. No further information was available.
07/27/2008 04:50 PM Killed man & girl on boat  24.0  Trois-Rivieres  
 Canada 
  on water in boat    Boat,On Water,Outside,Water 
Man killed by lightning in Quebec Canwest News Service Published: Sunday, July 27, 2008 TROIS-RIVIERES, Que. - A 24-year-old man died Sunday after being struck by lightning on a lake in Central Quebec, provincial police said. Terry Racine died immediately and the person on the row boat with him at the time, his girlfriend, has suffered a "violent nervous shock" as a result said Sgt. Michel Brunet of the Surete du Quebec. The incident happened at 4:50 p.m. and was also witnessed by the girlfriend's parents, who were on the water in Lac du Milieu in another boat at the time, Brunet said. The parents were not harmed. All are from the Quebec City area. Email to a friend Printer friendly Font: The incident happened in the Mauricie National Park, some 70 kilometres north of Trois-Rivieres, which is between Montreal and Quebec City. © Canwest News Service
07/27/2008 12:01 AM Injured 2 of 5 men   22.0  Hicksville NY 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game  N/A  Field,Near Water,Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees,Water 
07/27/2008 12:00 PM Killed man 3 of 3   0.0  Scugug Ontario 
 Canada 
  walking near struck rain barrel    Outside 
SCUGOG -- Lightning may have been a factor in the death of a Scugog man Wednesday night. Sources have told newsdurhamregion.com a member of Scugog’s Puckrin family was killed instantly when lightning struck a rain barrel on a farm where the man was walking.  However Staff Sgt. Nick Lisi of Durham police’s 15 Division would not confirm that lightning killed the man. “I cannot deny or acknowledge a lightning strike prompted the death of this individual,” he said. He said police continue to investigate the cause of the man’s death. A spokesman at the home of Mark Puckrin, who sources indicate is the father of the deceased man, said the family is grieving and would not comment on the incident at the present time.Â
07/27/2008 12:00 PM Injured 1 of 5 men   22.0  Hicksville Ny 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game  N/A  Field,Outside,Park,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
5 Injured by Lightning on Long Island Last Edited: Sunday, 27 Jul 2008, 2:34 PM EDT Created: Sunday, 27 Jul 2008, 2:34 PM EDT MyFoxNY.com -- Five men in Hicksville, N.Y., were taken to the hospital after a tree they were under was struck by lightning, Sunday. The men were playing soccer at Cantiague Park when it started to rain. The group went under the tree so they wouldn't get wet. Each was treated for non-life threatening injuries. We'll have more on Fox 5 News at 6.
07/27/2008 01:00 PM Injured woman   41.0  Silver Springs Md 
 USA 
  taking shelter under tree during soccer game    Outside,Soccer,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Under Trees 
41-year-old woman who had been watching a soccer game in Silver Spring was apparently struck by lightning, which hit a tree where she was taking shelter, said Pete Piringer, a spokesman for the Montgomery fire department. He said she was taken to a hospital and was expected to survive.
07/26/2008 07:30 PM Injured man 1 of 2   0.0  Saratoga Springs NY 
 USA 
  near struck tent pole    Camping,Festival,Outside,Tent 
Two struck by lightning at SPAC Updated: 07/27/2008 01:33 PM By: Web Staff SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- Two people were hit by lightning at SPAC. State Park Police tell us it happened around 7:30 p.m. Saturday. The lightning hit a tent pole during the evening's ballet performance while the man and woman were near the food court area. Their names have not been released, but both were sent to the hospital. Police tell us they are not seriously injured. This news comes only a week after a teen and a woman were struck by lightning at the Saratoga County Fair.
07/26/2008 07:30 PM Injured woman 2 of 2  0.0  Saratoga Springs NY 
 USA 
  near struck tent pole    Camping,Festival,Outside,Tent 
see man
07/25/2008 07:30 PM unknown boy   8.0  Tucson Az 
 USA 
  leaving field going to car  N/A  Baseball or Softball,Field,Outside,Sports Field,Taking Shelter,Walking,Walking to Vehicle 
Lightning strike at Reid Park kills baseball fan, 8 By Eric Swedlund ARIZONA DAILY STAR Tucson, Arizona | Published: 07.26.2008 advertisement An 8-year-old boy was electrocuted Friday evening as fellow spectators and ball-players were rushing to get out of a rain and lightning storm at the ballfields at Reid Park. The Tucson Fire Department initially received a report that the boy had been hit by lightning, but Capt. Tricia Tracy, a department spokeswoman, said the boy was standing in a puddle about 10 feet from a light pole and could have been shocked after lightning struck the pole. The boy was taken to University Medical Center with life-threatening injuries, Tracy said. He was pronounced dead shortly after 7:30 p.m., said Sgt. Mark Robinson, a Tucson police spokesman. The boy's name was not released. Robinson said city risk management officials will conduct an investigation into the death since it occurred on city property. The boy was at Hi Corbett watching an American Legion baseball tournament. The game had been postponed, and people were leaving when the lightning hit, Tracy said. Friday's storms struck most heavily on the Northwest Side and in the Midtown area, dropping nearly 2 inches in some places and cutting electricity to roughly 1,700 customers. The storms were different from a normal monsoon pattern as moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Dolly came into the area from Texas. The storm pattern is expected to deliver heavy rain today and Sunday, with a 60 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms predicted by the National Weather Service. The threat of flash flooding will be a major concern across the Tucson area this weekend. The weather service reported 0.83 of an inch of rain fell in 15 minutes at Catalina State Park, and Oro Valley received 1.85 inches in about 40 minutes. Pima County Regional Flood Control District sensors recorded 1.38 inches of rain at East Glenn Street and the Alamo Wash and 0.91 of an inch at Randolph Golf Course. Despite the heavy storms elsewhere, the airport remained dry, and the official Tucson rainfall for the day was zero as of 10 p.m. Tucson Electric Power spokesman Joseph Barrios said about 1,200 customers lost electricity after wires came down in Midtown area, with the outage centered along North Swan and East Grant roads. Another 500 customers were without power in scattered outages, Barrios said. Power lines were down, and there were reports of transformers sparking near Grant and Swan, Tracy said. The likelihood of rain will drop slightly heading into Sunday night, with the National Weather Service predicting a 40 percent chance of precipitation. Forecasts for Monday in the Tucson area are for a 30 percent chance of rain. The remnants of Dolly will continue to bring an elevated chance of rainfall until more normal monsoon thunderstorm activity returns by about the middle of next week, according to the weather service. On StarNet: Keep up-to-date with the weather forecast at azstarnet.com/weather. ● Contact reporter Eric Swedlund at 629-9412 or at eswedlund@azstarnet.com.
07/25/2008 12:00 PM Killed 4 farmers  0.0  Visakhapatnam 
 India 
       
Home > News > andhra-pradesh-news Four farmers killed by lightning Visakhapatnam, Jul 25 : Four farmers were killed and 15 school children injured as lightning struck them at Takkali and Santakaviti Mandals in Srikakulam district last evening. According to reports reaching the police here today, the farmers were working on the fields when lightning struck. All the four were killed on the spot. The victims were identified as V Appana (42), D Gavarayya (45), Edala Narayana (65) and Chenna Rao (35), all of them from Srikakulam District, police added. The North Coastal districts of Srikakulam and Vizianagaram had been experiencing heavy rainfall since last evening. In another incident, some children suffered minor injuries when lightning struck a school in Vizianagaram. They were taken to Government General Hospital for treatment.
07/24/2008 12:00 PM Killed 4 farmers  0.0  Srikakulam 
 India 
      Farming,Field,Outside 
Four farmers killed by lightning Visakhapatnam, Jul 25 : Four farmers were killed and 15 school children injured as lightning struck them at Takkali and Santakaviti Mandals in Srikakulam district last evening. According to reports reaching the police here today, the farmers were working on the fields when lightning struck. All the four were killed on the spot. The victims were identified as V Appana (42), D Gavarayya (45), Edala Narayana (65) and Chenna Rao (35), all of them from Srikakulam District, police added. The North Coastal districts of Srikakulam and Vizianagaram had been experiencing heavy rainfall since last evening. In another incident, some children suffered minor injuries when lightning struck a school in Vizianagaram. They were taken to Government General Hospital for treatment.
07/24/2008 07:30 PM Killed Marc Vernon Richard 2 of 2 @ CSU  33.0  Fort Collins Co 
 USA 
critical  may have been practicing martial arts in a small but heavily wooded area  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Critical,Delayed Death,Near Trees,Outside,School,Tree,Under Trees 
see 1 of CSU identifies students killed, injured in lightning strike BY COLORADOAN STAFF • JULY 25, 2008 Post a Comment Recommend Print this page E-mail this article SHARE THIS ARTICLE: Del.icio.us Facebook Digg Reddit Newsvine What’s this? CSU has identified the man killed in Thursday's campus lightning strike as 35-year-old William John Szlemko, a Ph.D. student in the Psychology Department. The university also identified the man injured in the strike as 33-year-old Marc Vernon Richard, a graduate assistant in the Psychology Department. Szlemko was pronounced dead just after the strike and Richard is in intensive care at Poudre Valley Hospital. The university says the strike happened around 7:30 p.m. Thursday in an area called Sherwood Forest, which is south of the Forestry Building, according to a CSU spokesperson. CSU Police performed CPR on both Szlemko and Richard just after getting to the scene and also used an automated external defibrillator (AED) to try and revive them. Both were taken to the hospital unconscious. An autopsy was done on Szlemko on Friday. Counseling services are available for colleagues and students through the University Counseling Center on campus. Students and employees can call (970) 491-6053 for an appointment and the center also has a walk-in service. It is in Aylesworth Hall on the first floor of the northwest wing. BY TREVOR HUGHES • TREVORHUGHES@COLORADOAN.COM • JULY 30, 2008 Read Comments(3) Recommend (8) Print this page E-mail this article SHARE THIS ARTICLE: Del.icio.us Facebook Digg Reddit Newsvine What’s this? A second CSU graduate student struck by lightning Thursday has died, university officials said. Marc Richard had been in critical condition since the on-campus strike that hit him, and immediately killed fellow grad student Will Szlemko. Richard died this afternoon, Colorado State University officials said. "He was just a really wonderful guy, very sincere, a nice guy, easy to talk to, very respectful. He was a great student, a brilliant student, very, very thoughtful," said Matt Malcolm, an assistant professor of occupational therapy at CSU. Malcolm served as one of Richard's advisors. Richard's area of research was how humans learn motor skills and marksmanship. "It's a sad loss for his family and friends, but also a sad loss to the research world," Malcolm said. "He had already done some great things as a graduate student. He had a lot of potential in that regard." Family members said Richard's organs were donated. Memorial services for Richard have not yet been scheduled. Szlemko was remembered by friends, family and the CSU community at a service last night. Friends say the two may have been practicing martial arts in a small but heavily wooded area of campus when Thursday's intense thunderstorm roared through. A bolt struck the towering evergreen the two were standing beneath.
07/24/2008 07:30 PM Killed William John Sziemko 1 of 2 @ CSU  35.0  Fort Collins Co 
 USA 
  in a small area of trees  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Near Trees,Outside,School,Tree,Under Trees 
One killed, another injured by apparent Thursday lightning strike By Hallie Woods • HallieWoods@coloradoan.com • July 25, 2008 Print this page E-mail this article Share this article: Del.icio.us Facebook Digg Reddit Newsvine What’s this? One man was killed and another injured Thursday after both were apparently struck by lightning at approximately 7:30 p.m., according to a CSU spokeswoman Dell Rae Mollenberg. The incident occurred in Sherwood Forest, a small area of trees just south of the university's forestry building. Both men were Ph.D.-level students or staff at Colorado State University, Mollenberg confirmed. Mollenberg said there were no witnesses of the lightning strike, and officials are waiting for autopsy results to confirm the findings. The Larimer County Coroner's Office will be conducting an autopsy at 10:30 a.m., said Debbie Reisdorff, deputy coroner at the coroner's office.
07/23/2008 08:30 PM Injured Susan Reilly  54.0  Freetown Ma 
 USA 
  in her basement  N/A  Basement,Cell Phone,Indirect,Indoors 
Severe thunderstorms pummeled SouthCoast in quick, powerful bursts Thursday, the second straight day of storms that flooded streets, cut power in some neighborhoods and left at least two people hospitalized after they were struck by lightning. By the end of the two-day storm, 2 to 4 inches of rain had fallen across eastern Massachusetts. A flood watch for most of the state was in effect through 2 a.m. today, according to Charlie Foley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Taunton. The weather service also confirmed Thursday that a tornado ripped through Warren, R.I., and Swansea Wednesday afternoon after forming as a waterspout off the coast of Barrington, R.I. Wind speeds were estimated at 65 to 75 mph and the tornado left a path about 40 yards wide. No injuries were reported, though some trees crashed onto power lines and houses. "What we're seeing today are a lot of showers and thunderstorms and heavy downpours in some areas," Mr. Foley said at mid-afternoon Thursday. "This on top of the heavy rainfall we received yesterday has the potential to cause urban and low-lying flooding." In Freetown on Wednesday night, two people were struck by lightning as severe thunderstorms rolled through the region. Both escaped serious injury. Susan Reilly, 54, said she was in her basement at 10 Martin Drive in Assonet when lightning struck her. "It came right across my foot, went up the side of my leg and went out through my fingertips," Mrs. Reilly said Thursday. "It shocked the living hell out of me." Mrs. Reilly was checked at Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River and suffered no serious injuries. On Thursday she only felt some numbness in her right leg and right-hand fingertips, she said. Lightning also struck a delivery truck driver at the Freetown Stop & Shop just after 6 p.m. Wednesday, police said. No additional information was released but Mrs. Reilly said she saw the victim at Charlton Memorial Hospital and he appeared not to be severely hurt. Meanwhile, in the Cape Cod Canal Thursday, a 43-foot sailing vessel was struck by lightning on its way to Onset, Petty Officer Kate Childers said. None of the four people on board was injured. The boat temporarily lost power when it was hit, but regained it after a Coast Guard rescue crew arrived on scene. The boat was towed to Sandwich Harbor. Waves in Buzzards Bay were 2 to 4 feet Thursday night, according to the weather service. ohn Eagan Story Created: Jul 25, 2008 at 4:10 PM EDT Story Updated: Jul 25, 2008 at 4:10 PM EDT In every sense of the phrase, it is truly a new day for Sue Reilly. This the first time in two days that she has had the nerve to venture outside, a far different cry from Thursday, when lightning outside found her all the way down in her basement. She was checking on her laundry while barefoot, talking to her daughter on the cell phone, when the bolt struck her. ABC 6 reporter Coleen Harry has her amazing story of survival...
07/23/2008 01:58 PM Injured man at rail station  0.0  Miami-Dade Fl 
 USA 
  standing on the platform    Outside 
Man Struck By Lightning At Metro-Rail Station He's Listed In Stable Condition At Hialeah Hospital HIALEAH (CBS4) ― A South Florida man is recovering after being struck by lightning at a Metro-Rail station. A series of strong thunderstorm cells that rolled across Miami Dade and Broward counties late Wednesday morning into the early afternoon produced heavy thunder and lightning at times. Just before 2 p.m. a man standing on the platform of the Northside Metro-Rail station in the 31-hundred block of Northwest 79th Street was struck by a bolt of lightning. The man told Miami Dade Fire Rescue that he was waiting to board a train when he was struck. When paramedics arrived at the station, the man was 'conscious and alert'. He was taken to Hialeah Hospital where he's listed in stable condition.
07/23/2008 03:30 PM Injured Eric Lamort 2 of 2  3.0  Lower Makefield Pa  
 USA 
  walking towards shelter near tree at pool    Near Trees,Near Water,Outside,Pool,Taking Shelter,Walking 
By Nora Muchanic LOWER MAKEFIELD, Pa. - July 23, 2008 (WPVI) -- Violent storms have ripped through Bucks county and two people have been struck by lightning at a local pool. The incident happened just before 3:30 p.m. at the Brookside Swim Club at 501 Stoney Hill Road in Lower Makefield. Police say 21-year old Bridget Gallagher of Lower Makefield was carrying a 3-year old boy she was babysitting. They were walking toward shelter, passing by a tree when it was hit by a bolt of lightning that transferred to the victims. Gallagher was taken to St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne, and later transferred to Temple University Hospital, where she is listed in fair condition. Story continues below Advertisement The child, 3-year old Eric Lamort, was airlifted to Children's Hospital in Philadelphia. No information on his condition is being released, but officials believed his injuries were less serious than Gallagher's.
07/23/2008 03:30 PM Injured Bridget Gallagher 1 of 2  22.0  Lower Makefield Pa  
 USA 
  walking towards shelter near tree at pool  N/A  During the storm,Near Trees,Near Water,Outside,Pool,Severe Thunderstorm,Taking Shelter,Tree,Walking,Water 
3-Year-Old, Woman Struck By Lightning In Bucks County Last Edited: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2008, 3:49 PM EDT Created: Wednesday, 23 Jul 2008, 3:47 PM EDT WTXF Fox Philadelphia A 3-year-old child and a woman are rushed to the hospital after being struck by lightning in Bucks County. Bucks County Fire officials says it happened at the Brookside Swim Club, at 501 Stony Hill Road in Lower Makefield, around 3:25p.m. Wednesday. The woman is in stable condition. The child was taken to St. Mary's Medical Center and will be flown to Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. His condition is not yet known. We'll have more information as it becomes available. 2 hit by lightning By BEN FINLEY and MATT COUGHLIN Bucks County Courier Times A sudden thunderstorm unleashed a lightning bolt that seriously injured a woman and a young boy she was carrying as they ran for cover at a Lower Makefield swim club Wednesday afternoon, police said. Meteorologists were stunned by the volume of lightning in Wednesday’s line of storms, which are expected to continue into midday today. According to Accuweather, there were 13,000 lightning strikes in the Greater Philadelphia area by 9 p.m. Wednesday and experts said it was possible that number could reach 20,000 overnight. The numerous strikes set houses on fire, knocked trees into cars, cut power and may have briefly halted the busiest train tracks in the country, officials said. But the bolt that struck the Brookside Swim Club on Stony Hill Road in Lower Makefield may have been the worst. A 3-year-old Lower Makefield boy is in stable condition at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia where he was taken by helicopter. A 21-year-old woman, Bridget Gallagher of Lower Makefield, was initially taken to St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown but was transferred to Temple University Hospital. Her condition was unknown as well Wednesday night. The storm practically ambushed the swim club, blackening the sky and clearing the pool in minutes, said Lower Makefield Police Chief Ken Coluzzi. Gallagher scooped up the child and was carrying him toward the changing rooms when a lightning bolt struck a 50-foot-tall evergreen tree surrounded by picnic tables and beach chairs 10 feet away from the woman and boy. The lightning, which struck about 3:10 p.m., spiraled through the ground and struck them. In the moments that followed, the boy was conscious with stable vital signs. But the woman appeared to be going into convulsions and her injuries appeared to be more serious, police said. The Yardley-Makefield and Penndel-Middletown rescue squads soon arrived. After the lightning strike, young children and teenagers poured out of the swim club with swollen eyes or still crying as their parents came to get them. Towels and bathing suits appeared to be abandoned at the entrance of the club. The tree that was struck with lightning was visibly scarred by a two-inch wide line traveling several feet down the trunk where the bark had been burned off. “Right now, I don’t know what’s going on,” one woman said. Pool officials declined to comment. Coluzzi said he didn’t fault the swim club with any wrongdoing, saying the storm came on very fast. “I was in my office and the sky did blacken,” he said. “Our emergency generator came on, and then the call came out for the swim club. BUCKS COUNTY, Pa. -- A baby sitter and a 3-year-old boy are back at home Friday morning after being struck by lightning. Bridget Gallagher, 21, was at a Bucks County swim club Wednesday when she was struck by lightning while holding the boy. Video Report Gallagher suffered burns from the bolt, but doctors said she'll be fine. She spoke only with NBC 10 about her ordeal. "It was scary. I was trying to be brave for the little boy, but it was definitely scary," she said. Gallagher said she is in pain but admits it is a miracle that she is alive. "It's a miracle, really it's a miracle," Gallagher said. Gallagher said she does not remember being struck by lightning. She was babysitting four children at the swim club in Lower Makefield Township when powerful thunderstorms rolled in. Gallagher said she took the children one by one between lightning strikes from the pavilion to the clubhouse. "It was just me and the little 3-year-old. I was holding him and he was crying to go inside so I waited until the lightning had calmed down a little bit and the last thing I remember is making a run for it under the pavilion," she said. Gallagher and Jack Lamorte, 3, were running past a tree when lightning struck. "Then they turned around and saw me on the ground and they rolled me over and I was still holding Jack," Gallagher said. "My biggest concern was for the baby sitter. I could see the baby was fine. Jack was crying and you could obviously see that he was fine. The baby sitter had a much harder hit apparently then the baby did. My biggest concern was for her," Eric Lamorte, Jack's father, said. Before Gallagher had left for the pool she decided to wear her sterling silver necklace. She said it is something she never does for fear of losing it. Doctors said that even though the necklace left burn marks around her neck and on her back, as well as on Jack's arm where it had contact with the metal, it may have saved their lives. "The doctor said it was a good thing because the lightning I guess came through my body and left through that," Gallagher said. Gallagher learned she was hit by lightning when she woke up at Temple Hospital in pain. "It hasn't really hit me. It's kind of weird I've never been to the hospital before so it was my first time," she said. The odds of being struck by lightning in the U.S. in any one year are one in 700,000, NBC 10 reported.
07/23/2008 03:00 PM Injured Chris Palmatier (mailman)  0.0  Virginia Beach Va  
 USA 
  on his rounds  N/A  Mail Carrier,Outside,Thrown,Yard 
Mailman struck by lightning in Va. Beach 06:09 PM EDT on Wednesday, July 23, 2008 By 13News Video: Downpour drenches Hampton Roads Larger screenE-mail this clip VIRGINIA BEACH – A lightning strike shocked a mailman on rounds Wednesday afternoon, police say. It happened around 3:00 p.m. in the 500 block of Sweeney Rd. in the Birchwood neighborhood. Officials with the US Postal Service tell 13News the carrier felt a tingling sensation rush through his body. Greg Thompson was arriving home and saw the commotion. "We happened to look over and we saw the mail truck on the side of the road and the mailman was sitting in the yard," he said. Also Online WVEC.com Weather Center WVEC.com Live Traffic Cameras Authorities say the man was taken to Sentara Va. Beach General Hospital for treatment. Meantime, in Norfolk, an apparent lightning strike sparked fire that burned a man’s vehicle. It happened just around 3:50 p.m. on 20th Street. A 13News photographer went to the scene and talked with a man who says lightning struck a tree and then went into his Jeep. No one was hurt. Norfolk Fire officials confirm they're checking out reports of lighting strikes in the Wards Corner area. In Portsmouth, there's a report of a tree down in the road at Leckie Street and Guthrie Road. The storm started as the afternoon rush was on, creating puddles on the roads and causing some accidents. Dominion Virginia Power is reporting more than 18,000 customers without power as of 5:45 p.m. V.B. mailman struck by lightning survives Last Edited: Monday, 28 Jul 2008, 11:17 PM EDT Created: Monday, 28 Jul 2008, 9:32 PM EDT - SideBar Related Items Links Lightning Safety from the Va. Dept. of Emergency Videos Filed by Mary Kay Mallonee VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (MyFox Hampton Roads) -- A Virginia Beach mailman is counting his blessings tonight. Chris Palmatier was delivering mail during last Wednesday's storm when a bolt of lightning shot out of the sky and hit him. He was walking across the front yard of one of his customers, near the corner of Sweeney Road and Mantle Lane in the Malibu neighborhood, when the bolt launched him five feet into the air and blew holes in his shoes. He survived. "Call it luck, fortune, fate, I don't know," said a very shy and modest Palmatier. "You wake up in the morning and you need to be thankful that you are breathing." Palmatier said he knew right away what had happened. "It wasn't just a flash. It was the whole boom and crackling. My feet got very warm and I just felt a warm sensation go all the way up through me. My hands and feet felt numb and I just kind of tingled. I was dizzy and my face was tingling." Palmatier flopped to the ground and called 911. The next thing he knew, "they were loading me in an ambulance after they cut all my clothes off." Believe it or not he missed only a couple days of work, and his customers missed him. He got choked up showing off all the cards he's received. "Just, 'Miss you,' 'Hurry back,' 'Hope you are well.' Just all well wishes, and I just want to thank them." Customers say seeing their mailman alive and well is thanks enough. George Foster is used to seeing Palmatier deliver his mail everyday. "I was really concerned. He's like a friend. I was really worried about him." Palmatier may be back at work, but he is working a bit slower. "I mean I'm very sore. I'm taking medicine, all my muscles, I'm very sore," he said. "I'm just happy to be back out here and working. It's good to keep going."
07/23/2008 07:30 PM Injured firefighter   24.0  Bethel Pa  
 USA 
  standing in garage doorway to fire station    Garage with door open,Outside 
Two injured as lightning strikes Bethel firehouse By: Kathleen E. Carey, kcarey@delcotimes.com 07/23/2008 Email to a friendPost a CommentPrinter-friendly Advertisement BETHEL - A township police officer and a firefighter were struck by lightning Wednesday night at the Bethel Township Hose Co. No. 1 firehouse, officials said. Officer John Carpenter, 22, was being held overnight at Crozer-Chester for observation, according to Bethel Township Police Chief David Houser. An official at Crozer-Chester Medical Center said Carpenter was stable and confirmed he was being held for observation. He said he had no record of the firefighter. Bethel Fire Chief Michael Heacock said the firefighter, who has been a member of the company for three years and is in her 20s, was still being evaluated in the emergency room at 10:45 p.m. "Our firefighter should be OK," he said. "She has some tingling in her arms. They're just clearing her out." He declined to release her name. Houser said Carpenter was standing in the open garage area of the firehouse at 3737 Foulk Road and the firefighter was beside a fire truck when the firehouse itself apparently was struck by lightning. "He was at the Bethel firehouse and he was standing in the doorway," the chief said. "(He) heard a bang and then all he knew was he was tossed. "He was alert enough, he was trying to call out," Houser said of the officer's attempt to alert the 911 emergency communications center. "He was trying to call out when he went down." The chief said others in the firehouse said they saw the lightning move throughout the building's frame. "They could see it traveling around the door frame," Houser said. Heacock said the 7:30 p.m. strike also caused damage to the firehouse. "We lost a garage door opener and our telephone system," he said. "It just shocked the ... system." He said the company was utilizing the old phone system in the meantime. The chief said Carpenter was surrounded by his family at Crozer-Chester Wednesday night and was in good spirits, joking with his relatives. Houser said medical personnel said there was no indication of an entry mark or an exit mark on the officer's body and the rest of the tests were OK. He said Carpenter was being held so neurological tests could be performed. Carpenter has served on the Bethel police force for two years. He is one of 23 part-time officers. The lightning strikes were part of tumultuous storms that pummeled the area Wednesday night, also causing power outages in the Delaware Valley. At 8:30 p.m., PECO official Ted Caddell said 30,000 throughout the Philadelphia area had blackouts but he was unable to isolate geographically where they were. Residents in Brookhaven and in Lower Chichester said power was inoperable there for part of the night. "We had pretty severe thunderstorms moving throughout the area," he said, as the first wave of the storms hit at the change of shift. Caddell said PECO officials were addressing these while waiting for the system to move through the area. With regards to the outages, he said, "We're whittling them down."
07/23/2008 09:30 PM Injured Anthony Tomasz  19.0  Hopkinton Ma 
 USA 
  inside on computer  N/A  Computer / Video Game,Indirect,Indoors 
Hopkinton man struck by lightning By Rob Haneisen/Daily News staff The MetroWest Daily News Posted Jul 24, 2008 @ 12:46 AM A young Hopkinton man was struck by lightning at around 9:30 last night, fire officials said. He was being treated for his injuries late last night. His condition was not available before presstime. Lightning injuries are more common this summer. Nearly 80 people are killed and more than 300 are injured each year in the United States. A state safety official said electrical storms seem more active in New England this summer. Last week, nine people were injured and four remained hospitalized after they sought shelter under a large tree that was then hit by lightning near a soccer field in Dorchester. The day before, two people were killed in Standish, Maine, when they were struck by lightning in a yard. Last month, three people were struck, one in Scituate and two in Haverhill. One of the Haverhill victims, Ralph Potter, 47, was killed while he and his wife were hiking in Winnekenni Park. "This seems to be an unusual year as far as that goes," said Peter Judge, a Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency spokesman. The Dorchester incident was a case of people trying to get off a wide open field (which can be vulnerable to lightning strikes) and then choosing a poor shelter (under a large tree), Judge said. "It hit the tree, went into the ground and then literally came up from the ground and hit the people," Judge said of the strike. MEMA yesterday issued a lightning safety awareness bulletin because of the fatal strikes in Maine, Haverhill and the Dorchester incident. Like most weather hazards, caution before the storm can prevent many tragedies. MEMA advises people to pay attention to weather forecasts and head inside at the first sound of thunder. Even though a storm may be miles away, if you can hear thunder you are close enough to be hit by lighting. If you're caught outside in a storm, squat but do not lie flat on the ground. You can seek shelter in the woods under smaller trees. Avoid metal objects including tractors, sheds, wires and metal fences. Cars do provide some shelter, but you can still be injured if you're inside a car when it is struck by lightning, especially if you are touching metal. According to National Geographic News, about 10 percent of those struck by lightning are killed and those who survive a strike can have lasting medical problems including heart and nerve issues as well as burns. Scott O'Day, 49, was struck on June 22 in Scituate while walking his dogs with his wife and took days to recover. The jolt knocked him out of his shoes and he blacked out. When he came to, he could not feel his legs and had a gash on his head from the fall. He regained feeling and was released from the hospital the next day, according to a story in The Patriot Ledger. Even inside the home, you are not completely safe from lightning. Avoid showering or talking on a corded phone during a storm. You should also unplug electrical appliances to prevent them from being damaged. Homes are often struck by lightning and sometimes the damage and danger is hidden. "A lot of times it travels through the wiring and blows TVs and computers and can do a lot of damage," said Natick Fire Deputy Chief Richard White. "Sometimes the fire is obvious and sometimes it's hidden in the walls." Firefighters use thermal imaging cameras to see smoldering flames inside walls. "A person may smell something burning and they can't see anything," he said. Regardless, if you suspect your house has been struck by lightning, call the fire department. "Absolutely call the fire department. If there is something that isn't really detectable we'll find it and maybe save a lot more damage from happening," White said. Sometimes the damage is obvious. "Last year we did have a strike where lightning hit a tree, followed the irrigation system inside and blew part of the siding off the house and damaged a lot of the electrical system," said Southborough Fire Capt. Joe Mauro. Mauro said there's no surefire way to protect your home from lightning strikes. Lightning arresting systems (usually comprised of metal rods on the roof, connected to a wire cable that touches the earth) sometimes work and surge protectors can help protect computers and televisions. But your best bet is to simply unplug everything before the storm hits. (Rob Haneisen can be reached at rhaneis@cnc.com or 508-626-3882. Check out is weather blog at blogs.townonline.com/weathergeek.)
07/23/2008 12:00 PM Injured 2 lawn care workers  0.0  Nobleton  
 Canada 
  mowing a lawn    Mowing the lawn,Outside 
NOBLETON - Quick thinking by a 15-year-old girl helped save two people struck by lightning. Two lawn-care workers for Green Lawn Professionals were mowing the lawn of a large home just north of King Side Rd. and Hwy. 27 when lightning struck the area between them on Wednesday morning. "It was a huge bang that shook the whole house," said the girl's mother, Rhona Hayhoe. "My daughter was looking out the window and saw the lightning bolt strike him. She immediately came to me and told me to call 911." At first her daughter, who was "pretty upset" by the incident, thought the one worker was helping out the person closest to where the lightning struck but it soon became apparent both workers had been hit. According to Hayhoe, paramedics responding to the scene transported the two workers away although she thought but had vitals signs before leaving for hospital. Citing privacy reasons, paramedics were unable to comment on the condition of the workers.
07/23/2008 12:00 PM Injured contractor  0.0  Norwich Ct 
 USA 
  outside behind a building    Outside 
Norwich – A contractor at Norwich Housing Authority apparently was struck by lightning during a fierce thunderstorm that swept the city this afternoon. The unidentified man was treated at the scene by American Ambulance personnel and was not transported to the hospital, according to Joanne Drag, deputy executive director at the housing authority. Drag said the man is a contractor working on the authority’s extensive energy efficiency upgrade project at the Oakwood Knoll federal public housing complex. The man was outside behind a building when he or something near him was struck. Housing authority maintenance workers are trained in CPR and called 911 immediately, Drag said. She said she did not know the identity of the man or the company for which he worked.
07/23/2008 07:30 PM Injured John Carpenter police officer  22.0  Bethel Pa  
 USA 
  standing in garage doorway to fire station  N/A  Garage with door open,Police Officer 
And lightning struck the door of the Bethel Township Fire Co. located on Foulk Road in Delaware County. A police officer was knocked off his feet and hospitalized. He was rushed to Crozer-Chester Medical Center, where he was reported to be alert and conscious. A firefighter was taken to a hospital as a precaution. Bethel Township police Officer John Carpenter was recovering at Crozier Chester Burn Center after being indirectly struck by lightning while at work Wednesday night. Carpenter was leaning against the frame of the bay door at the fire department talking about the violent storms that were rolling through the region. "I see a flash," Carpenter said. "It was worse than a Taser shot." Quiz: Test Your Lightning Knowledge The jolt of lightning knocked him to the ground and unconscious. Rescuers said the lightning fried his radio, damaged the garage door and sent a female firefighter to the hospital with minor injuries. Carpenter, 22, who also works as a volunteer firefighter, said hospital tests so far have shown no damage. Carpenter said he feels a little achy in his joints but is eager to get back to work. "I feel extremely lucky," Carpenter said. "I'm going to go play the lottery."
07/23/2008 02:00 PM Injured couple camping  0.0  Quebec 
 Canada 
am not pm  camping on island in tent  N/A  Camping,Near Trees,Near Water,Outside,Tent,Tree,Water 
Camping couple recount lightning strike Pair lucky to survive, weather expert says Last Updated: Thursday, July 24, 2008 | 9:05 PM ET CBC News A Montreal couple struck by lightning while camping on a remote Quebec island are lucky to be alive, a leading climatologist says. 'There was a crack in my head, and the light, white blue orange, it was everywhere.'— Kim McNairn Kim McNairn and Les Perreaux were on day four of a six-day kayaking trip on the Cabonga Reservoir in Quebec last week when a thunderstorm rolled through the area and lightning struck the tiny island where they'd pitched a tent for the night. Perreaux — a newspaper reporter who has worked as a war correspondent — said his experience in Afghanistan pales in comparison to the adrenaline shot he got that night. "I've had bombs fall not too far away, and I've had bullets whistle over my head, and this was scarier," he said. The lightning burned a 10-metre furrow from the tent. (Les Perreaux/Kim McNairn)The evening in La Vérendrye Provincial Park started calmly with a beautiful sunset, but the couple was awoken around 2 a.m. by thunder in the distance. "Kim was counting, and I ducked outside, and I could smell electricity," said Perreaux, 37. "Then it was like we were in the middle of a bomb, like a bomb went off right near our tent," said McNairn, 32, a CBC journalist in Montreal. "Like there was a crack in my head, and the light, white blue orange, it was everywhere." "It didn't matter if your eyes were open or closed; the light was in your head. It was that intense," Perreaux said. McNairn said the light was followed by tingling that coursed through her body for several minutes before fading. "I was feeling a tingling sensation through my arms and legs. I felt I'd been shocked and it wasn't painful, but it was a sensation that I have felt something," she said. A nearby tree was scorched in the storm. (Les Perreaux/Kim McNairn)"Then it started to get scary," McNairn said. "I'm screaming and you can smell burned hair. You think, I'm so close, I'm smelling this, this is it, this is it." The two lay in their tent, worrying about another strike, the condition of their hearts, and whether the campsite was going to burn. They got up to check outside the tent and huddled inside until the sun came up. That's when they found evidence of the lighting's path — the base of a nearby tree blown out by the impact, disturbed soil at the base of one of their tent poles, a burned-out furrow running from the tent pole to the forest, and scorch marks on the tent's frame. The couple's tent was hit directly, or indirectly by a ground current, and they're lucky to have emerged unscathed because a lightning bolt can carry a charge of 100 million volts, said Dave Phillips, a senior climatologist with Environment Canada. "My sense is that it could very well have hit the tree and came down," he told McNairn after she asked about her experience. The lightning left burn marks on the tent poles. (Les Perreaux/Kim McNairn)"The tent peg is so low, that's the other thing; I think it took the ground current. It can travel dozens, 50, 100 metres across that route." "It was luck" more than anything else that they weren't injured, Phillips said. Every year about a dozen people are killed by lightning in Canada, and more than 70 are seriously injured. McNairn and Perreaux's thin mattress probably provided some insulation, he said. Perreaux and McNairn, nature enthusiasts who have gone on countless camping trips, plan more. "I hope I don't change too much and get nervous about going outside," McNairn said. "But it sure is humbling to feel the force of nature like that, and I hope that's what I take away, is [respecting] it, and wow, man, we're lucky." "I think it's easier to chalk it up to good luck," Perreaux said. July 25, 2008 at 10:33 AM EDT MONTREAL — It was 2 a.m. when I crawled back into the tent and passed a hushed message to my wife: “Something's coming.” For about an hour, Kim and I had listened to a thunderstorm stalk our island campsite in northern Quebec. But it wasn't the approaching lightning and thunder that drove me to duck in fear during a late-night pee. Instead, it was the smell of electricity – a dry odour combining heat, static and poolside chemicals – that hung just outside the tent and set my hair standing on end. In the darkness, we nervously stared at the ceiling as a steady wind and scattered raindrops rustled the top of our flimsy nylon tent. Then it hit. The all-enveloping light consumed us. It would be wrong to say we witnessed a flash; the white, yellow, orange and blue filled our senses, whether our eyes were open or shut. The shattering roar was like a rocket engine pushing into my chest and skull, leaving me deaf to everything, including Kim's screams. It felt like minutes passed, though I've been told it could only have been a fraction of a second. “Breathe,” I thought, reassured I was still alive as long as I could suck air. “Keep breathing!” I yelled at Kim, fearing if I was alive she must surely be dead. That much I thought I knew about the fickle ways of lightning. The smell of burnt hair filled the tent as we alternated between whimpering and hyperventilating. I waited for the shelter to burst into flames. I smelled for signs the forest was igniting around us. Would a split tree fall on our little orange tent? Would one of us spontaneously combust? That's when the second lightning bolt hit no more than 100 metres away (the island was small, after all) sending us into one more round of hysterics. This time, it was the more familiar flash-bang of a scary-close strike. We spent the night reliving the moment and taking inventory. Hands and feet tingled, but there were no wounds. In our examination by flashlight, we failed to find the burnt follicles we could smell. Fluttering hearts and stomachs were first diagnosed as symptoms, then written off as rattled nerves. When the morning sun rose, we searched for clues. One silver tent pole had new black marks where sections join, seeming evidence of passing current. Freshly exploded earth marked their connection to the ground. A new black furrow shot out from the tent into the thicker forest, showing the path of electricity as it searched for a way around bedrock into deeper ground. We finished the kayak trip two days later. An incredulous park ranger suggested we see a doctor when we got home but by then all the flutters and tingles were gone. So we searched for an explanation for how we could have lived through that stormy night. In the end, we found only one: luck.
07/23/2008 06:00 PM Injured delivery truck driver  0.0  Freetwon Ma 
 USA 
       
Severe thunderstorms pummeled SouthCoast in quick, powerful bursts Thursday, the second straight day of storms that flooded streets, cut power in some neighborhoods and left at least two people hospitalized after they were struck by lightning. By the end of the two-day storm, 2 to 4 inches of rain had fallen across eastern Massachusetts. A flood watch for most of the state was in effect through 2 a.m. today, according to Charlie Foley, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Taunton. The weather service also confirmed Thursday that a tornado ripped through Warren, R.I., and Swansea Wednesday afternoon after forming as a waterspout off the coast of Barrington, R.I. Wind speeds were estimated at 65 to 75 mph and the tornado left a path about 40 yards wide. No injuries were reported, though some trees crashed onto power lines and houses. "What we're seeing today are a lot of showers and thunderstorms and heavy downpours in some areas," Mr. Foley said at mid-afternoon Thursday. "This on top of the heavy rainfall we received yesterday has the potential to cause urban and low-lying flooding." In Freetown on Wednesday night, two people were struck by lightning as severe thunderstorms rolled through the region. Both escaped serious injury. Susan Reilly, 54, said she was in her basement at 10 Martin Drive in Assonet when lightning struck her. "It came right across my foot, went up the side of my leg and went out through my fingertips," Mrs. Reilly said Thursday. "It shocked the living hell out of me." Mrs. Reilly was checked at Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River and suffered no serious injuries. On Thursday she only felt some numbness in her right leg and right-hand fingertips, she said. Lightning also struck a delivery truck driver at the Freetown Stop & Shop just after 6 p.m. Wednesday, police said. No additional information was released but Mrs. Reilly said she saw the victim at Charlton Memorial Hospital and he appeared not to be severely hurt. Meanwhile, in the Cape Cod Canal Thursday, a 43-foot sailing vessel was struck by lightning on its way to Onset, Petty Officer Kate Childers said. None of the four people on board was injured. The boat temporarily lost power when it was hit, but regained it after a Coast Guard rescue crew arrived on scene. The boat was towed to Sandwich Harbor. Waves in Buzzards Bay were 2 to 4 feet Thursday night, according to the weather service.
07/23/2008 09:30 PM Injured man   48.0  Hopkinton Ma 
 USA 
  picking up electric cord    Indirect,Indoors 
Hopkinton: Lightning does strike twice By Michael Morton/Daily News staff The MetroWest Daily News Posted Jul 24, 2008 @ 11:20 PM HOPKINTON — A 20-year-old North Street man has been released from the hospital after electricity from a nearby lightning strike surged through a computer and into his body Wednesday night, Deputy Fire Chief Ken Clark said. A second man, a 48-year-old Saddle Hill Road resident, picked up an electrical cord during the same storm, was taken to Framingham's MetroWest Medical Center in stable condition and held overnight for observation, Clark said. Clark did not know whether the 48-year-old had been released from the hospital and said medical privacy laws prevented him from disclosing the names of the two. Messages left at the listed phone number for each home were not returned. Clark said neither man suffered burns from the surges. "To have two in the evening from the same storm is unusual," he said. The first surge occurred at 49 North St. around 9:30 p.m. as the 20-year-old sat working at a computer, Clark said. The surge knocked him from his chair, the deputy chief said. The 20-year-old was taken by ambulance to Milford Regional Medical Center and later released, Clark said, though he was not sure if the man was there overnight. Firefighters raced to the 48-year-old man's 173 Saddle Hill Road home just after 10 p.m. after he picked up an extension cord running from his yard to his home and was hit with a surge, Clark said. Clark said Hopkinton firefighters also extinguished a small, lightning-related electrical fire Wednesday at 4 p.m. in the basement of 18 Wescott Drive. No one was injured. Lightning also sparked fires Wednesday in homes in Upton and Sudbury. (Michael Morton can be reached at mmorton@cnc.com or 508-626-4338.)

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