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Mon, 07/01/2013 12:00 AM unknown Lightning warning system ignored in Ridgewood  0.0  Ridgewood NJ 
 USA 
  not leaving field    Education,Science 
Lightning warning system ignored in Ridgewood MONDAY, JULY 1, 2013 BY CHRIS HARRIS STAFF WRITER THE RECORD PRINT | E-MAIL RIDGEWOOD  Members of the Village Council acknowledge that a lightning detection system installed last year at parks and schools is being ignored by athletes and coaches. Resident Boyd Loving told the council that during a recent storm, the lightning detection system sounded. Yet three baseball games continued, Loving said, on the fields behind Village Hall. Loving suggested an ordinance be put in place to penalize those who ignore the lightning detection warnings, which sound when lightning strikes are imminent within a 10-mile radius. "It's very frustrating," admitted Councilwoman Gwenn Hauck. She said she, too, has watched play continue through the warnings. "We are talking with the Police Department about how to enforce it." The matter will be on the agenda for the council's next meeting. In the meantime, Hauck said she will reach out to parks and recreation officials and the field committee, to remind them of the rules. "We spent money for this system, and it's being disregarded," Mayor Paul Aronsohn said. "They just shouldn't be out there [when the alarms sound] if it's an organized sports program. It's just not acceptable." Email: harrisc@northjersey.com - See more at: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20130107071647_213790741_Lightning_warning_system_ignored_in_Ridgewood_system_is_ignored.html.htm#sthash.QwjtvV09.dpuf
Sun, 06/30/2013 11:30 AM Injured Randy Whitt  0.0  Byers Peak Wilderness CO 
 USA 
      Hiking,Outside 
Hello my name is Randy Whitt , I'm from Fraser , Colorado and this is what happend yesterday. So it started off as a bluebird sky Sunday in colorado , myself and two friends went hiking in the Byers peak wilderness outside of Fraser. Arrived at the trail head at 8 am and planned a hike of bottle peak, ptarmigan peak and Byers peak in that day . We had got the the summit of both peaks by 10 am and we're hiking the 4 miles from ptarmigan to Byers. We arrived at the base of Byers with an afternoon rain shower and a thunder storm across the valley more than 20 miles away. We waited the storm out and waited another 30 minutes after the last thunder . And began the last 1.1 up the face of Byers peak. At this point over an hour since the last sound , we thought the coast was clear . We had just reached the summit and not more than 30 seconds later , the three of us were struck . I am trying to figure out how we were struck ? Why were struck ? My friend took a video of me being struck it shows a bolt of light enter thru my cheek, at this point I was looking at the ground and notice a spark come out of my shoe. Is it better that all of us got hit , and the amount of power got dispersed ? So possibly the effects won't be so severe? Are there any long term effects from being struck ? Is there anything I should start doing to prevent any problems ?
Sun, 06/30/2013 12:00 PM Injured man laying cable, 2 of 2  33.0  Sandpoint ID 
 USA 
  laying underground cable    Construction site,Indirect,Outside,Work 
Sun, 06/30/2013 12:00 PM Injured man laying cable, 1 of 2  45.0  Sandpoint ID 
 USA 
  laying underground cable    Construction site,Indirect,Metal,Outside,Work 
SANDPOINT, Idaho - Two men laying an underground cable in northern Idaho have been hospitalized after a lightning strike that authorities say likely traveled through the cable. Bonner County Emergency Medical Services tells the Bonner County Daily Bee (http://bit.ly/12eD4eZ) that a 45-year-old man was flown to Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane, Wash., after the lightning strike Saturday morning. Another man in his 30s was taken by ambulance to Bonner General Hospital. Names haven't been released. Bonner EMS spokesman Bob Abbott says the 45-year-old man has wounds in the lower half of his body from electrical burns. He says the other man didn't have those types of burns but instead appears to have been hit by electricity traveling through the ground.
Sat, 06/29/2013 01:40 PM Injured Lily Hoberman, 2 of 3  9.0  Zionsville IN 
 USA 
  in a field  N/A  Fresbee,Ground Strike,Outside,Summer Camp 
Kids go to hospital after lightning strike Updated: Saturday, 29 Jun 2013, 4:49 PM EDT Published : Saturday, 29 Jun 2013, 2:57 PM EDT INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) - Three children were taken to an Indianapolis hospital Saturday afternoon after reports of a lightning strike on the north side of Indy. Authorities were called to the 9300 block of Moore Road around 1:40 p.m. to the Goldman Union Camp Institute. IMPD Spokesman Officer Kendale Adams says witnesses reported seeing a lightning strike, though information on whether the children were injured as a result of the lightning strike was not immediately available. Authorities say the incident happened in the camp's northeast field. Police say when they arrived camp counselors had already begun life-saving attempts on the children. Pike Township firefighters then took over with life-saving attempts before the children were taken to the hospital. According to IMPD, one child was listed in critical condition around 4 p.m. The other two children's conditions were listed as stable. The children are a 9-year-old boy from Kentucky, a 9-year-old girl from Chesterfield, and a 12-year-old boy from Ohio. Officials were working to contact parents of children at the camp.
Sat, 06/29/2013 01:40 PM Injured Noah Auerbach, 3 of 3  9.0  Zionsville IN 
 USA 
  in a field  N/A  Burnt,Camping,Field,Fresbee,Ground Strike,Outside,Summer Camp 
3 children struck by lightning on Northwestside: The children were at a summer camp. All were from out of state. Alex Campbell / The Star Written by Alex Campbell and Eric Weddle FILED UNDER Indianapolis News Riley Hospital For Children Purchase ImageZOOM Police say a lightning strike in an open field injured three children at the Goldman Union Camp Institute, a summer camp near Zionsville, on Saturday afternoon. / Alex Campbell / The Star A lightning strike in an open field injured three children at a summer camp on Saturday afternoon, police said, leaving one in critical condition. The strike hit the Goldman Union Camp Institute, a Reform Jewish camp on the 9300 block of Moore Road, near Zionsville. What the children were doing in the field when the strike hit is not yet known. Reporters were not allowed inside the camps gate and police said camp officials did not want to discuss the incident publicly. A woman answering the camps main phone line, who gave her name only as Susan, said were not at liberty to discuss what happened. We really cant give out any information at this time, she said, adding: Right now safety is just our highest concern. Campers at our camp are doing fine and were going on with our program. All three of the victims are from out of state: a 9-year-old female from Missouri, a 9-year-old male from Kentucky and a 12-year-old male from Ohio. Its not clear from police reports which of those three is the one in critical condition. Officials were called to the scene around 1:40 p.m. on Saturday as thunderstorms rolled through the area. By the time they arrived, camp counselors had begun lifesaving efforts, according to an Indianapolis Metropolitan Police report. Two of the injured were taken to Riley Hospital for Children. The third, who was in critical condition, was taken to St. Vincent Hospital. Police said that the camp has more than 100 children. According to its website, the camp had at least four different programs running as of Saturday, for children in grade 3 through 12. Nine-year-old Noah Auerbach of Louisville was playing Ultimate Frisbee with friends at an Indianapolis summer camp last weekend when he was struck by lightning. But after being released from the hospital, he returned to camp Friday, his mother said. We thought he would have the weekend, the two days, to say goodbye to all the friends he made and to let them know he is completely good and healthy and to have a closure to the summer, said Star Auerbach, Noahs mother. Hes an amazing kid, so were feeling very, very lucky. Noah and two other children were struck by lightning June 29 at Goldman Union Camp Institute, a Reform Jewish camp in Indianapolis. Noah was released from Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis two days after the incident, and a 9-year-old girl from Missouri who was also struck was released this past week. But a 12-year-old from Loveland, Ohio, who was also struck was transported from Riley to Cincinnati Childrens Hospital Medical Center on Wednesday. After being struck, Star Auerbach said, Noah was unconscious for about a minute. He has a mark on his leg where the lightning struck and a pinhole on his foot where the electricity exited his body, but he was somehow OK, she said. This was Noahs second year attending the Indianapolis camp, said his mother, who also attended the camp when she was a child. Auerbach said camp counselors and staff members swift response to the incident could have saved the childrens lives. I think it is very unlikely it will ever happen again, Auerbach said. But I think I will always probably be nervous when its thundering outside.
Sat, 06/29/2013 01:40 PM Injured Ethan Kadish, boy 1 of 3  12.0  Zionsville IN 
 USA 
  playing ultimate frisbee in a field  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Field,Ground Strike,Outside,Summer Camp 
Zionsville, IN (FOX19) - A community came together Tuesday night to pray for a local boy struck by lightning over the weekend. MORE UPDATED: Kenton Co. pets up for adoption Take a look at these pets and see if you can give them a forever home. Pictures updated 07/01/2013! More >> Ethan Kadish, 12, of Loveland, was one of three injured when lightning struck at the Goldman-Union Camp Institute near Indianapolis. He's still being treated in a children's hospital in Indianapolis where he is in serious but stable condition. The other two children injured in the incident have since been released from the hospital and are at home with their families. Through songs, prayers and well-wishes, congregants at the Rockdale Temple are hoping for a full recovery or Ethan. "Your presence and your prayers have meant more to the Kadish family than you can possibly know," said Rabbi Sigma "Sissy" Coran, of Rockdale Temple. Ethan was hit by lightning while playing ultimate Frisbee with other campers. He was one of three injured. The other two were a boy and girl, both nine years old. "The circumstances of his injuries should not be really why we're here, but his personhood, his humanity, and the boy, the young man he is becoming," added Coran. The support to help Ethan recover isn't just coming from the Rockdale Temple, or the camp, or even Cincinnati. It's coming from all over the world. "I want you to understand and know that across North America, across the world, there's the embrace that we all hope Ethan and his family feel," said Rabbi Steven Mills of the Union for Reform Judaism. Ethan's family has described him as a team player, not just in sports, but with the doctors and nurses taking care of him. "He recently hit two home runs in one game, and we hope that he is in the process of hitting a few more along the way," said Coran at the prayer service. Mills also read some comments from the camp's director, Rabbi Mark Covitz. He also sent along his well-wishes and prayers. The Kadish family was not in attendance, as they're still at the hospital in Indianapolis. They watched the service through a live stream on the Internet. The Kadish family has also issued this statement: We want to express our appreciation for everyone's support and prayers. We cannot begin to describe the gratitude we feel for the swift response of the camp counselors and staff members of Goldman Union Camp Institute. Their extensive training and the camp's preparedness allowed them to be lifesavers when the urgent need arose. At this time, Ethan is receiving the best medical care available and responding appropriately. Words aren't sufficient to communicate our appreciation to the medical caregivers who have been involved in our son's care and treatment. The families affected are establishing the Miracle Kids Medical and Rescue Fund at Goldman Union Camp Institute to provide medical equipment and supplies to the camp so that it can continue to have world-class assets onsite to keep the campers safe at all times. Your continued thoughts and prayers are welcomed and needed for our son's recovery. We also offer our own thoughts and prayers for the complete healing of the two other campers affected by this tragic incident. We ask for privacy as we focus on Ethan's care and the needs of our other children. Thank you, Scott and Alexia Kadish Copyright 2013 WXIX. All rights reserved. (JTA)  On Saturday, two weeks after Ethan Kadishs 13th birthday, the members of his family will gather around a Torah scroll in the chapel of Cincinnati Childrens Hospital for a small ceremony marking his entrance into adulthood. This was not the bar mitzvah that Scott and Alexia Kadish envisioned seven weeks ago when Ethan was still at the Goldman Union Camp Institute, a Reform Jewish summer camp in Zionsville, Ind. Scott and Alexia had just finished mailing Ethans bar mitzvah invitations and were making final plans for a week of vacation when they received the call: While helping younger campers learn the rules of Ultimate Frisbee, Ethan and two other children had been struck by lightning. The other children were released from the hospital soon afterward. But Ethan, who suffered cardiac arrest as a result of the strike, was in critical condition. Nearly two months later he is still fighting the effects of a catastrophic brain injury. (JTA)  On Saturday, two weeks after Ethan Kadishs 13th birthday, the members of his family will gather around a Torah scroll in the chapel of Cincinnati Childrens Hospital for a small ceremony marking his entrance into adulthood. This was not the bar mitzvah that Scott and Alexia Kadish envisioned seven weeks ago when Ethan was still at the Goldman Union Camp Institute, a Reform Jewish summer camp in Zionsville, Ind. Scott and Alexia had just finished mailing Ethans bar mitzvah invitations and were making final plans for a week of vacation when they received the call: While helping younger campers learn the rules of Ultimate Frisbee, Ethan and two other children had been struck by lightning. The other children were released from the hospital soon afterward. But Ethan, who suffered cardiac arrest as a result of the strike, was in critical condition. Nearly two months later he is still fighting the effects of a catastrophic brain injury. We know that Ethan will be in the hospital for many months, Scott said. But the progress we have seen  which we are measuring week to week and month to month, not day to day  has been in a forward direction. Initially hospitalized in Indianapolis, Ethan was airlifted to Cincinnati Childrens Hospital in early July. After two weeks in intensive care, he has regained the ability to breathe on his own, but he remains unable to engage in purposeful movements. Although he has irregular periods of open-eyed wakefulness, his parents told JTA they are not sure of the extent of his vision. The family has benefited from the support of their community, including their rabbi, Sissy Coran of Rockdale Temple in Cincinnati, who spent the night with the Kadishes on the second day of Ethans hospitalization. Meals have been delivered to them three times a week, and hundreds have signed up for Team Ethan on the Lotsa Helping Hands website, which assists families caring for a sick relative. We have experienced the best of humanity, Alexia said. Now the family is seeking another kind of help. In cooperation with the HelpHOPELive fundraising website and the Great Lakes Catastrophic Injury Fund, the Kadishes are hoping to raise money to cover Ethans medical expenses, many of which will not be covered by insurance, they say. In an interview, the couple  who also have set up a webpage to keep well-wishers informed of Ethans condition  were candid about the emotional difficulties of the preceding weeks, from the anguished ride from Cincinnati to the hospital in Indianapolis, to the emotional pain of having an unresponsive child. But they remain hopeful. Recently they took Ethan outside into the sunlight and were rewarded with a response from their son: a tiny but unmistakable laugh. Nonetheless, as they prepare for the months and years ahead, the Kadishes are cognizant of the many challenges facing their family. They have two other children, ages 16 and 10. Our other children certainly know there has been a huge change in our family lifestyle, Alexia said. They see how many hours Scott and I spend at the hospital. But were trying really hard to create a schedule as the school year starts to provide some source of normalcy in our family unit. This, Scott added, is our new normal. Read more: http://www.jta.org/2013/08/20/news-opinion/united-states/struck-by-lightning-at-camp-ethan-kadish-battling-catastrophic-injury#ixzz2cYn0TPA5 A 13-year-old southwest Ohio boy seriously hurt by a lightning strike at an Indiana summer camp in June is breathing on his own but hasn't been able to speak or move without help, his family and doctors said. The jolt of lightning stopped Ethan Kadish's heart and led to brain damage, his parents and doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital said Tuesday. The boy is still undergoing treatment and rehabilitation at the hospital, and the damage to his brain was significant, said Dr. David Pruitt, the hospital's medical director of in-patient rehabilitation. "It's very early in Ethan's recovery process, and I expect his overall brain recovery time will extend at least for a couple of years," Pruitt said. The boy was injured June 29 at Goldman Union Camp Institute, a Reform Jewish camp that serves children in the Midwest entering grades three to 12. A 9-year-old Chesterfield, Mo., girl, and a 9-year-old Louisville, Ky.-area boy were also hospitalized for injuries from the lightning strike but were released a few days later. Camp Director and Rabbi Mark Covitz said Kadish was teaching younger campers how to play ultimate Frisbee when the lightning struck near the athletic field on a mostly sunny day with a rumble of thunder in the distance, The Cincinnati Enquirer reported. Covitz said no one saw the lightning, but a loud crack was heard and staffers later found a dead tree about 40 yards from the field. The boy's father, Scott Kadish, said he heard people who were there refer to the lightning "as a bolt out of the blue." Covitz speculated that the lightning may have bounced off the tree. The boy's mother, Alexia Kadish, said she sees some small progress and often climbs into her son's hospital bed to comfort and talk to him. "I see more light behind his eyes," she said of her son, who loved playing baseball. She said she often talks to him about what his brother and sister are doing and about TV shows and the Cincinnati Reds. Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2013/09/11/lightning-strike-leaves-ohio-boy-brain-damaged/#ixzz2ehtf3MVM
Sat, 06/29/2013 12:00 PM Killed student  0.0  Shimla Himachal Pradesh 
 India 
  under a tree    Outside,Under Trees 
0 Mail Print Youth dies in Shimla from lightning strike Source : Last Updated: Sat, Jun 29, 2013 20:20 hrs0 Comments Shimla, June 29 (IANS) A youth died in Shimla after being struck by lightning Saturday, police said. Santosh, a student of M.Com, was returning from the historical Jakhu Temple with two friends when lightning struck him, a police official said. He said the victim was standing below a tree along with his friends when the disaster occurred. However, his friends escaped unhurt. The Jakhu temple dedicated to Lord Hanuman is located at Mount Jakhu -- the highest peak in the town located at an altitude of 8,500 feet.
Fri, 06/28/2013 01:00 PM Injured E J Eldridge  0.0  St. Augustine FL 
 USA 
  on boat fishing, trying to outrun storm    Boat,fishing,Fresh Water,Indirect,On Water,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Fri, 06/28/2013 06:00 PM Injured man   0.0  Conowingo FL 
 USA 
  under a tree  N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Tree,Under Trees,Yard 
Port-area man is Cecil's second lightning-strike victim this month Story Commenting ShareShare Print Create a hardcopy of this page Font Size: Default font size Larger font size COURTESY OF JAIME MULLER/CECIL COUNTY FIRE BLOG Thunderstorm Lightning strikes near Elk Mills Friday evening. Posted: Sunday, June 30, 2013 9:30 pm | Updated: 12:41 am, Mon Jul 1, 2013. By Jane Bellmyer and Dara McBride jbellmyer@cecilwhig.com A Port Deposit area man was hospitalized after being injured by a lightning strike on Friday afternoon. Wayne Tome, EMS chief for Water Witch Fire Company, said the man was injured when lightning struck where he was standing just before 6 p.m. as an afternoon storm blew through the area. Tome, who declined to identify the man, said the man was found on the 1400 block of Dr. Jack Road in Conowingo. Tome said it is believed the man was injured through a proximity lightning strike. The man was found under a pine tree and next to a wood pile, which was on fire, presumably from the lightning strike, Tome said. The man was in serious but stable condition at Christiana Hospital as of Saturday, Tome said. Tome cautioned people to stay indoors during bad weather. â¬SWhen there are these storms, it is imperative that people take shelter and are inside so they're not susceptible to lightning strikes,⬝ Tome said. This is the second time in a month that there have been reports of a person struck by lightning. On June 13, Haley Embleton, 19, was struck by lightning at the Plumpton Park Zoo in Rising Sun. During a rainstorm, Embleton, an intern for the zoo and a University of Delaware student from Sussex County, Del., had taken shelter under a tree. Embleton was taken to Christiana Hospital and in a coma for several days.
Fri, 06/28/2013 12:00 AM unknown Bad safety info from NWS WCM in WI  0.0  La Crosse WI 
 USA 
  bad safety info    Bad Safety info 
LA CROSSE, Wisconsin (WXOW) - It's lightning safety awareness week and with over 25 million cloud-to-ground lightning strikes per year in the United States, lightning related dangers are very real. But they're also commonly ignored. "There's always going to be that first strike out there," said Todd Shea, Warning Coordination Meteorologist at the La Crosse National Weather Service. "You just don't want to be anywhere near it." According to the National Weather Service, lightning accounts for an average of 50+ deaths per year and hundreds of injuries. "Lightning is one of the underrated killers out there in addition to flash flooding at some of the other threats we see with thunderstorms," said Shea. "But the reason we spend this week on lightning safety is because people often times don't think about it or don't respect that it could happen to them." Because of the nature of lightning, many of those who are injured suffer long-term complications. "If you think about a lightning strike, and all of the electrical charges that are associated with brain activity, that [lightning] can injure that [a brain] for an awful long time," said Shea. "People can have lasting affects that can go on for years with things like depression and headaches after being struck by lightning." From 2006-2012 around two-third of the lightning related deaths and injuries occurred to people who were engaging in outdoor, leisure activities. Many victims were headed to safety but waited too long to take cover. "It's simple things," said Shea. "It's working in your yard when there's thunder or lighting in the area. It's being in a park or big outdoor setting. Fishing is pretty common, people hiking in higher up areas and ridge tops, beaches when thunderstorms are rolling in. Those are all common occurrences." Lightning can strike up to 10 miles outside of the parent thunderstorm and no matter what it looks like outside, if you hear thunder, it's time to go indoors. Because of this, the National Weather Service has adopted the saying "when thunder roars go indoors." "Our average number of fatalities each year is still too high," said Shea. "Any fatality is too high. But we average 53 deaths a year from lighting still. So while that number is coming down a little but we just kind of want to make sure the word is getting out there. That people need to move indoors anytime there is thunder in the area and lightning strikes nearby. So you're not a statistic." Before heading out for the day, know the forecast and have a plan if a thunderstorm rolls in. At the first rumble of thunder, head indoors. Thirty minutes after the last clap of thunder you can safely return your activities. "I guess where I cringe is still seeing outdoor events taking place, even in the La Crosse area here, where there is thunder already occurring or lighting strikes can be seen off in the distance and they keep trying to keep the event going," said Shea. "They're basically taking chances with all that lighting in the area." If you get caught outdoors without shelter nearby, a hard-topped car can provide some safety from lightning. If you cannot get to a car, avoid trees and other tall objects and try to get as low as possible. "If you have no other option, cower down," said Shea. "Stay on your feet but bend down like a ball and try to make yourself as low of a target as possible." Shea said lightning injuries inside a building are rare but do occur. This is because lighting can travel through anything that conducts electricity. You can minimize your risk by staying off of wired devices and out of the shower during a thunderstorm. Cell phones are safe to use. For more information about lightning, the National Weather Service is a goldmine for educational material and resources. Links to the resources used for this story can be found below. http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/ http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/severeweather/resources/ttl6-10.pdf http://www.weather.gov/iln/lightningsafetyweek http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2012/20120620_lightning.html
Fri, 06/28/2013 01:00 PM Injured Joe Baker, 1of 2 on boat  36.0  St. Augustine FL 
 USA 
  on boat fishing, trying to outrun storm  N/A  Boat,Direct hit,fishing,Fresh Water,On Water,Taking Shelter,Water 
Boaters have 'hazy' memory of lightning strike Posted: July 3, 2013 - 11:03pm Contributed photo E.J. Eldridge and Joe Baker stand in front of Bakers boat on Tuesday, holding the jacket and shirt that Baker was wearing when he was hit by lightning. ADVERTISEMENT By Douglas Jordan Special to The Record Joe Baker said friends have been telling him he might want to start buying lottery tickets. Baker, 36, was struck by lightning on Friday while out in his boat fishing with his girlfriends son. Im very lucky to be alive, Baker said on Tuesday. Im also very lucky that this young man was with me. He definitely saved my life. Baker works for the St. Johns County Schools District in maintenance. Ethan E.J. Eldridge, 14, is the son of Bakers girlfriend, Erin Cook. The two were alone in the boat, set on a day of fishing for reds and whatever else they could catch. I dont know if Id call it luck, Eldridge, a sophomore at St. Augustine High School said. I think it was thanks to the man upstairs. Baker said the two had put his 18-foot flats boat into the water on Friday about 7 a.m. and had spent the morning fishing the creeks off the Intracoastal Waterway channel north of the riverfront restaurant, Caps On the Water. Right around 1 p.m., the skies started turning dark. We got into this one little creek that we like to fish, Baker said. There was a storm in the distance. But after a while, the storm started moving closer to us, heading south. I figured we should probably head north to get away from it. They decided to try to outrun the storm if it got any closer. Shortly after that, he said, they started seeing lightning. It was popping all around us, very close to us, Baker said. I said, E.J., weve got to go now, and we pulled up anchor. Baker said he turned the boat to the north and opened up the throttle. We were probably doing about 30 mph, near the top end of what my boat can do, he said. After that, my memorys pretty hazy. Both said they never saw or felt the lightning bolt that came down and struck Baker in the head, ripping through his rain jacket and shirt, shredding and burning the garments. I just remember sort of a sensation of falling, Eldridge said. I have kind of a picture in my head of where I was looking, then nothing. Both were knocked unconscious by the strike. Eldridge woke up first. I wasnt sure what happened, honestly, he said. I didnt know we were hit by lightning. I thought maybe the boat had hit something. The boat was covered in blood. It was awful. Most of it was from me, because I had hit my chin when I fell. Then I saw Joe struggling, having some kind of convulsions. Baker said he was choking on his own vomit, fighting just to maintain consciousness. He came over and picked me up, turned me over, Baker said. If he hadnt done that, I probably would have died. I had no strength at that moment, and I feel like I was just barely holding on. Fortunately, the lightning strike knocked out the boats 115 horsepower Johnson outboard, too, Baker said, or the boat would likely have continued going at near top speed. It sure could have been a lot worse if the boat had kept going with no one at the wheel, Baker said. When we came to, we had just drifted up onto the shell bank, near the airport. Eldridge picked up his phone and saw that his mother, who works for The St. Augustine Records advertising department, had texted him around 1 p.m. It was then almost 2. He sent her a text saying theyd had an accident. Of course, I thought they were kidding around with me, said Cook, whose father is Dan Chitwood, a lieutenant with the St. Johns County Sheriffs Office. But when I called him and he told me more, I realized they were serious. Thats when I panicked a bit. Cook called 911 and told the dispatcher to send help immediately. The only problem was, she wasnt exactly sure where the boat was located. Baker was too incapacitated to speak to her, and her son wasnt much better off. I told E.J. to just dial 911 from his phone and they could ping it for the location, she said. For some reason, though, he didnt do it, and the dispatcher called me back. Then she remembered that she had a GPS locator for her sons phone installed on her phone, so she called the dispatcher back and gave the location. When deputy Jay Bucher showed up, he and Eldridge lifted Baker up into the Sheriffs boat and rushed him to the boat ramp, where emergency personnel were waiting. Both men were taken to Flagler Hospital, then Baker was transferred to UF Health in Jacksonville, where he spent the night. The doctors said I was extremely lucky, Baker said. I didnt have to be told that, of course. Ive got some charred hair on my head and several red streaks up and down my torso, my right eardrum is blown out, and Im still pretty weak. But other than that, I feel pretty good. Its a miracle that theyre both alive, Cook said Tuesday. It could have been a real tragedy, but it ended up all right. Bakers mother, Bonnie Sellers, agreed. Its just unbelievable, Sellers said. Im very grateful that my son is OK. Will the experience keep either of the two men from going out in the boat again? Absolutely not, Baker said. Well be back out there hauling in fish as soon as Im able to. Eldridge, who has some fresh stitches on his chin and forehead to show for the adventure, agreed. By Douglas Jordan ST. AUGUSTINE - Joe Baker said friends have been telling him he might want to start buying lottery tickets. Baker, 36, was struck by lightning last month while out in his boat fishing with his girlfriends son. Im very lucky to be alive, Baker said Tuesday. Im also very lucky that this young man was with me. He definitely saved my life. Baker works for the St. Johns County School District in maintenance. Ethan E.J. Eldridge, 14, is the son of Bakers girlfriend, Erin Cook. The two were alone in the boat, set on a day of fishing for reds and whatever else they could catch. I dont know if Id call it luck, Eldridge, a sophomore at St. Augustine High School, said. I think it was thanks to the man upstairs. Baker said the two had put his 18-foot flats boat into the water on a Friday about 7 a.m. and had spent the morning fishing the creeks off the Intracoastal Waterway channel north of the riverfront restaurant, Caps On the Water. Around 1 p.m. the skies started turning dark. We got into this one little creek that we like to fish, Baker said. There was a storm in the distance. But after a while, the storm started moving closer to us, heading south. I figured we should probably head north to get away from it. They decided to try to outrun the storm if it got any closer. Shortly after that, he said, they started seeing lightning. It was popping all around us, very close to us, Baker said. I said, E.J., weve got to go now, and we pulled up anchor. Baker said he turned the boat to the north and opened up the throttle. We were probably doing about 30 mph, he said. & After that, my memorys pretty hazy. Both said they never saw or felt the lightning bolt that came down and struck Baker in the head, ripping through his rain jacket and shirt, shredding and burning the garments. I just remember sort of a sensation of falling, Eldridge said. I have kind of a picture in my head of where I was looking, then nothing. Both were knocked unconscious by the strike. Eldridge woke up first. I wasnt sure what happened, honestly, he said. I didnt know we were hit by lightning. I thought maybe the boat had hit something. The boat was covered in blood. It was awful. Most of it was from me, because I had hit my chin when I fell. Then I saw Joe struggling, having some kind of convulsions. Baker said he was choking on his own vomit, fighting just to maintain consciousness. He came over and picked me up, turned me over, Baker said. If he hadnt done that, I probably would have died. I had no strength at that moment, and I feel like I was just barely holding on. Fortunately, the lightning strike knocked out the boats 115-horsepower Johnson outboard, Baker said, or the boat would likely have continued going at near top speed. It sure could have been a lot worse if the boat had kept going with no one at the wheel, Baker said. When we came to, we had just drifted up onto the shell bank near the airport. Both men were taken to Flagler Hospital, then Baker was transferred to UF Health in Jacksonville, where he spent the night. The doctors said I was extremely lucky, Baker said. I didnt have to be told that, of course. Ive got some charred hair on my head and several red streaks up and down my torso, my right eardrum is blown out and Im still pretty weak. But other than that, I feel pretty good. Read more at Jacksonville.com: http://jacksonville.com/news/metro/2013-07-04/story/st-augustine-boaters-have-hazy-memory-lightning-strike#ixzz2YMHwUZ2i
Fri, 06/28/2013 12:00 PM Killed 5 dead in Bihar  0.0  Bihar 
 India 
       
Samastipur: Five persons died due to lightning in Bisenpur Beri village of Bihar's Samastipur district on Thursday, an official said. The five villagers were struck dead by lightning when they were on their way to a neighbouring village for a shradh ceremony, Block Development Officer Shivnand Singh said. The deceased were identified as Ravi Thakur, Makhan Rai, Bindeshwar Rai, Suresh Singh and Sriram Singh, the BDO said.
Thu, 06/27/2013 05:30 PM Injured Demariio Williams 3 of 3  17.0  West Memphis AR 
 USA 
  taking shelter under a tree  N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Under Trees 
WEST MEMPHIS, AR- (WMC-TV) - Three people are recovering after being stuck by lightning when a round of storms moved in Thursday night. Mary Munn recalled it being dinner time on Oxford Street when suddenly a noise sent her racing to the front door. "Next thing we hear, boom," said Munn. "We looked out the door I thought something may have hit a tree & No, it was three kids under the tree. The lightening had hit them." Three teenaged friends were walking home from playing basketball. Then, they were struck by lightning. "One was face down, the other one was laying down hollering help, help, help', " said Munn. Police officers administered CPR until an ambulance arrived. Laportia Knowlton said her 17-year-old brother, Demario Williams, does not remember much after he and the two other teens ducked under a large tree during a thunderstorm. "All I can do is just thank the Lord because it could have been way worse than what it was,"she said. "He's doing pretty good he has burns on his right foot and his left upper back ... He couldn't feel his legs." Dr. Barry Gilmore of Le Bonheur Children's Hospital said nine people nationwide have died this year from lightning strikes. "If you're noticing those kind of thunderstorms, you really don't need to be outside. There really is no safe place outside during a thunderstorm," said Gilmore. (WMC-TV) - Three people are recovering after being stuck by lightning when a round of storms moved in Thursday night. Mary Munn recalled it being dinner time on Oxford Street when suddenly a noise sent her racing to the front door. "Next thing we hear, boom," said Munn. "We looked out the door I thought something may have hit a tree & No, it was three kids under the tree. The lightening had hit them." Three teenaged friends were walking home from playing basketball. Then, they were struck by lightning. "One was face down, the other one was laying down hollering help, help, help', " said Munn. Police officers administered CPR until an ambulance arrived. Laportia Knowlton said her 17-year-old brother, Demario Williams, does not remember much after he and the two other teens ducked under a large tree during a thunderstorm. "All I can do is just thank the Lord because it could have been way worse than what it was,"she said. "He's doing pretty good he has burns on his right foot and his left upper back ... He couldn't feel his legs." Dr. Barry Gilmore of Le Bonheur Children's Hospital said nine people nationwide have died this year from lightning strikes. "If you're noticing those kind of thunderstorms, you really don't need to be outside. There really is no safe place outside during a thunderstorm," said Gilmore. Knowlton said her brother could be released from the hospital as soon as the next day or two. She is unaware of the condition of the two friends he was with. Dr. Gilmore said if those three survived that strike, it is likely they will be fine, and their conditions will continue to improve. Being under trees is one of the worst places to take shelter in dangerous weather. Copyright 2013 WMC-TV. All rights reserved
Thu, 06/27/2013 12:00 PM Injured 1 of 3 teens  15.0  West Memphis AR 
 USA 
  taking shelter under a tree  N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Under Trees 
WEST MEMPHIS, Ark. (WREG) - Three people have been struck by lightning in West Memphis. WREG reported that they were struck on Oxford Street after trying to hide from the rain under a tree and have been taken to the hospital. Few details are available now, bur for the latest details on this developing story, go to the WREG website: http://on.kthv.com/11MfIAZ
Thu, 06/27/2013 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 3 teens  0.0  West Memphis AR 
 USA 
  taking shelter under a tree  N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Under Trees 
Wed, 06/26/2013 12:00 PM Killed Robert Wiley  35.0  Naples FL 
 USA 
  climbing down scaffolding  N/A  Construction site,Direct hit,On a Roof,Outside,Work 
Construction worker dies after lightning strike Related Content http://bit.ly/11PqUJM http://www.naplesnews.com THE ASSOCIATED PRESS NAPLES, Fla. -- A construction worker in southwest Florida has died after being struck by lightning while he was climbing down scaffolding. Collier County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Karie Partington says Robert Wiley died at the scene Wednesday afternoon. Partington tells the Naples Daily News ( http://bit.ly/11PqUJM) that Wiley and other constructions working at a Naples home saw bad weather approaching and decided to seek shelter. That's when Wiley was struck. Partington says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will determine whether any charges should be filed against Wiley's employers. The National Weather Service has recorded two fatal lightning strikes in Florida so far this year. The state led the country with five lightning deaths last year. Read more here: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20132706055832_construction-worker-dies-after.html.htm#storylink=cpy SWFL's second lightning strike in less than a week Posted: Jun 27, 2013 7:00 PM EDT Updated: Jun 27, 2013 7:11 PM EDT By Rick Ritter, Reporter - email COLLIER COUNTY, FL - Collier County 911 Dispatch: Is he awake? Caller: No, I believe he is dead. Collier County 911 Dispatch: Is he breathing? Caller: No, he's not. Now, a 35-year-old construction worker is gone far too soon. "It's very sad, I feel very sad for the family, he was only 35 years old," said Aubrey Thomas, a neighbor. It all happened Wednesday afternoon at a construction site in Golden Gate Estates. Co-worker Arturo Vallejo says he told Naples resident Robert Wiley and another worker to get down from scaffolding when storm clouds rolled in. "I yelled to them and said get off the scaffolds and get out of the rain," Vallejo said. Just seconds later, lightning struck Wiley. "All of a sudden, there was a big flash. The thunder was horrendous and I said to my grandson 'oh something must have got hit,'" Thomas said. Both Wiley and another worker fell nearly 12 feet to the ground. One stood up shortly after--but Wiley didn't move. "The other guy finally got up and got to his friend and flipped him over face up and he said 'get up Robert, get up Robert. Tell me something. Tell me you're okay.'" Vallejo said. Deputies say Wiley was pronounced dead on the scene. Workers tell us they've been at the single-family home for two weeks, but Wiley just started helping days ago as a subcontractor. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration was out investigating Thursday, along with county officials who tell us the employers showed them legal permits to be on the site. Just days ago, lightning struck another man in Bonita Springs. Experts say one thing many don't realize, that storms are a threat even when they are miles and miles away. They say the best thing to do is play it safe. "As much as 30 miles away. Often people say it wasn't raining but lightning can actually go out from the top of that storm cloud and work its way down well away from where it's raining," said Haley Webb, Chief Meteorologist for NBC2. Wiley's family members visited the scene Thursday but were too distraught to go on camera. Meanwhile, OSHA says the investigation is ongoing.
Wed, 06/26/2013 10:20 AM Injured Officer Deglys Chavarria  27.0  Key West FL 
 USA 
  on motorcycle    Motorcycle,Outside,Police Officer,Work 
Officer hurt by strike Lightning hits cop on his motorcycle BY ADAM LINHARDT Citizen Staff alinhardt@keysnews.com Key West Police Department motorcycle patrolman Deglys Chavarria was hurt in a lightning strike while on duty Wednesday morning. Chavarria, 27, was headed south on his department-issued motorcycle on North Roosevelt Boulevard at the Palm Avenue stoplight about 10:20 a.m. when the bolt of lightning either struck him directly or struck nearby and then hit him, said police spo...
Wed, 06/26/2013 06:30 PM Injured Blake Draeger  8.0  Rib Mountain WI 
 USA 
  on a motorcycle  N/A  Burnt,Cardiac Arrest,CPR,holes in ground,Motorcycle,Outside 
0 comments resize text printbuy reprints RIB MOUNTAIN, Wis.  Authorities say an 8-year-old boy has been burned by a lightning strike in central Wisconsin. Rib Mountain fire officials tell WSAW-TV (http://bit.ly/17irm7y ) the boy was on a motorcycle Wednesday about 6:30 p.m. near Edgar when his father saw lightning strike his son. The father ran over to the boy and began CPR. He then put him in a car, started heading to the hospital and called 911. An ambulance met them en route and took the child to Aspirus Wausau Hospital. He was transferred to another hospital, which was not identified. There's no immediate word on his condition. TOWN OF RIB FALLS (MyFoxWausau) - UPDATE 6/27/13: Officials say 8-year-old Blake Draeger is recovering from second degree burns at U.W. Hospital in Madison after he was struck by lightning Wednesday. There are holes in the ground where the 8-year-old boy was struck. "It was a very loud bang," said Jim Draeger, Blake's Great Uncle. Blake's Great Uncle, Jim Draeger, said it happened Wednesday evening at his farm in the Town of Rib Falls. "My nephew's son was out riding his mini-bike out on this farm here, while his father was working in the backhoe and the storm came up, it was not even raining yet, and a sudden bolt of lightning struck," said Draeger. His family said the strike threw Blake off his mini-bike, knocking him unconscious, even though the boy was wearing a helmet. His father ran to help. "He seen his son was actually laying under the mini bike and he was non-responsive, no pulse, not breathing," said Draeger. Draegar said Blake's father used C.P.R. to revive his son. Family members called 911 and rushed for help in disbelief. "You would think lightning would strike a silo, or a tree, or even a cow, but why did it hit him," said Draeger. Blake's burns were severe. "They took his helmet off here at the scene and they could tell that, my nephew told me that when he got on the scene, he said it smells like burnt hair," said Draeger. Family members said he had burns on his head, shoulders, and feet. Officials said he was taken to U.W. Hospital in Madison to recover and family members said the outlook seems to be good. "Blood work is coming back ok, sounds like he's breathing on his own, they're taking the breathing tube out, his heart is doing great, so they've got high hopes," said Draeger. But they said this strike hit too close to home. "It was a sleepless night, I have children and it's hard not to get emotional because, you know, it's your livelihood and obviously we're all praying that it comes out for the best," said Draeger. As the 8-year-old boy recovers in Madison. Family members said Blake is semi-conscious in critical condition, but stable. ----------------------------------- MARATHON COUNTY (MyFoxWausau) -- Marathon County investigators have confirmed an 8-year-old boy was struck by lightning Wednesday night. There's no word on his condition. According to the sheriff's department it happened north of Edgar. Officials say the boy was originally taken to Aspirus Hospital in Wausau for treatment. He's since been transferred to a hospital in Madison. Stay with Newsline 9 and MyFoxWausau.com for the latest updates. June 26 started as a typical day on the Draeger family farm in the town of Rib Falls. Chris Draeger was helping his father, Wayne Draeger, with some chores while Chris son, Blake, rode his dirt bike in a nearby field. Some gray clouds were rolling in and a hint of rain was in the air when, without warning, a bolt of lightning arced through the sky and struck 8-year-old Blake, throwing him from his minibike  though Chris doesnt recall hearing thunder or seeing signs of a thunderstorm. He only remembers seeing his son thrown to the ground, and then sprinting to his sons limp body and ripping off the boys helmet and other protective cycle gear as Wayne Draegers wife, Jenifer Wilhelm, phoned 911 for help. As I took his helmet off the back of his head was extremely hot, it almost hurt to touch his body, Draeger said. I could smell burnt skin and his face looked like he was somewhere where a bomb had gone off. Hes got beautiful long blonde hair and it was a burnt mess. I just kept thinking, This cant be happening. A week after hundreds of millions of volts of electricity raced through Blakes body, heating him and the air around him to nearly 60,000 degrees Fahrenheit in a fraction of a second, the Weston boy is recovering at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison where doctors agree he is fortunate not to have become one of the 2,000 people killed worldwide every year by lightning. The blast of electricity ravaged Blakes body. It ruptured both his eardrums, scratched the lenses of his eyeballs and left more than a quarter of his body covered with second-degree burns before exiting through a wound in his back. Although Blake appears to be on the road to recovery now and doctors say he could come through with no permanent injuries, that was anything but certain immediately after he was struck. When Chris, the owner of Draeger Trucking and Excavating in Marathon, reached his son, Blake was unconscious. Wayne drove a pickup to Blakes side and everyone climbed inside. Chris began doing CPR as they headed toward Wausau. Page After several minutes of CPR, Blake moaned and his body shook. I was just so happy when he began to breathe again, Chris said. But I was worried about him ending up as a complete vegetable. He was staring into outer space and his eyes were going every which way, he was moaning and shaking and at that point I just didnt know what to think. An ambulance, alerted by Jenifers frantic 911 call, met the group on 72nd Avenue and put Blake on life support as they rushed him to Aspirus Wausau Hospital. Blake stayed at Aspirus for only an hour or two before he was transported by ambulance to the hospital in Madison. Blake could not be transported by helicopter because by then the same storm that injured Blake had settled in over Wausau, grounding the emergency chopper. Chris said the medical team at UW doesnt predict any permanent damage to Blakes ears or eyes. Doctors visit with him every couple of days to remove a bit more of the burned skin that covers most of his body. Blakes nickname is Tuffy, and Wilhelm said the name accurately describes how Blake is dealing with the situation. When he first came to, he seemed overwhelmed by what had happened to him, Wilhelm said. But today his mood is 100 percent better than it was a couple days ago, and every day he is getting better and asking more questions. Blake, a student at the Wausau Area Montessori Charter School, could be released from the hospital as early as Thursday. Chris said he is unsure whether Blake will fear thunderstorms, but he is certain Blake will continue to love the outdoors and ride his dirt bike. What he doesnt know is which medical bills, which could total hundreds of thousands of dollars, his insurance will cover. He said for the moment he is focusing on Blakes recovery. Hes ready to go home and play with his friends, and he is so tough that I think hes going to be just fine, Chris said. Hes always been such a good kid. If anything, I think this teaches everyone not to take daily things for granted and to realize how fast your life can change. Boy struck by lightning adjusts quickly after close call By The Associated Press July 6, 2013 EMAIL PRINT (0) COMMENTS Weston  An 8-year-old central Wisconsin boy who survived a lightning strike to the head last month is adjusting well since being discharged from the hospital. Blake Draeger doesn't have any lingering fear of lightning and he even enjoyed a recent fireworks show. Doctors told the family he isn't expected to suffer any permanent damage, but they're still keeping tabs on his second-degree burns, lingering high blood pressure and unusual kidney activity, the Daily Herald Media in Wausau reported. Blake came home from the hospital Thursday to find a house full of cheering family members, friends and neighbors. In honor of his return people released balloons with copies of his story attached. "My family was all here for me," Blake said. "(The best part) was having a big celebration and letting the balloons go." Blake was struck by lightning while bicycling through a field on June 26. Both of his ear drums were ruptured, his eye lenses were scratched and a quarter of his body received second-degree burns. His father, Chris Draeger, performed CPR on the way to Aspirus Wausau Hospital. He was later transferred to the burn unit at the University of Wisconsin Hospital in Madison, where he was put on life support and hooked up to a feeding tube. Despite the severity of his injuries, he recovered at a rate that stunned his doctors, Chris Draeger said. Blake isn't expected to suffer any permanent damage. His doctors told his family that if his ear drums don't heal on their own, minor surgery can correct any issue. His burns are also expected to heal without leaving scars. "He's doing great. We are so fortunate," Chris Draeger said. "I can't explain how he went from having a breathing tube nine days ago to jumping on the trampoline today. But the doctors are as shocked as we are. He's incredible." It didn't take long for Blake to adjust to life at home. Since he's been back he's returned to the activities he loves, including gardening, playing outside and raising baby chickens and kittens. Blake said he doesn't feel traumatized by what happened to him. "I'm not afraid of lightning at all," Blake said. "I'm just really glad to be home. I'm excited to be back." It's not so easy for his father, though. He and Blake watched a Fourth of July fireworks show on Thursday, and while Blake loved the show, Chris Draeger said the bright booms made his heart skip a beat. "I had a rough time hearing loud booms again," the father said. "I've loved fireworks all my life, but I just couldn't enjoy them."
Tue, 06/25/2013 12:00 PM Injured 1 of 2   0.0  Tewksbury NJ 
 USA 
       
TEWKSBURY  Two people were struck by lightning on McCan Mill Road, according to unconfirmed radio reports. One was reported to be conscious and alert, the other unconscious. A helicopter is on standby, for possible landing at the Pottersville Road firehouse. Rescuers were being directed to follow back roads, since a tree was reported to be blocking access on Route 512. The National Weather Service issued a thunderstorm warning today.
Tue, 06/25/2013 03:00 PM Injured Ronnie Jones 1 of 2  0.0  Louisville GA 
 USA 
  working on water main  N/A  Ground Strike,Outside,Work 
Thursday, June 27, 2013 LOUISVILLE, Ga. (WRDW) -- One of the two men who was hit by an indirect lightning strike in Aiken is back home from the hospital. City Administrator Richard Sapp says Utility Superintendent Ronnie Jones was released from the hospital on Thursday and is doing fine. The second man, an employee of the contractor working on the repair, was said to be OK when found at the scene. Wednesday, June 26, 2013 LOUISVILLE, Ga. (WRDW) -- Two workers were hit by an indirect lightning strike in Louisville Tuesday afternoon. City Administrator Richard Sapp says the two men were working on a water main break when there was a sudden bolt of lightning. Sapp says the current either traveled along the pipe or through the water and jolted the men. Utility Superintendent Ronnie Jones is being taken to the Joseph M. Still Burn Center as a precaution. The second man, an employee of the contractor working on the repair, was said to be OK when found at the scene. About 10 percent of the city is still without water service, but crews are working to fix it.
Tue, 06/25/2013 03:00 PM Injured Jackie Watkins  0.0  Windsor SC 
 USA 
  on front porch  N/A  Garden,Ground Strike,Outside,Porch,Yard 
WINDSOR, S.C. (WRDW) -- An Aiken County woman survived a close call with some severe weather Tuesday. Jackie Watkins was at her house when an afternoon storm rolled through. She says, "The sky was slowly clearing up by my house, and I figured, OK, it's passing, it's gone." She was trimming a tomato plant by her front porch when she got quite a shock. "All of a sudden, the next thing I knew a big flash of lightning was right behind me, and I turned around, and I looked and the lightning struck the tree right there at my front porch," she said. The strike knocked down her tree, literally just feet from where she was standing. "I was so close to it. It was like I felt the heat off of it, so I took off running. It scared me to death," she said. The most shocking part to Watkins was that the strike came without any storm clouds left in the sky, which is something Columbia County EMA Director Pam Tucker says can happen anytime a storm comes through. "Lightning most of the time will strike 10 miles away," Tucker said. She says it's best to seek shelter, either in a closed structure like your house or car during a thunderstorm. "You should stay inside until 30 minutes goes by and you haven't heard any additional thunder," she said. Something Watkins and her family say they plan to do now. "From now on, I'll stay in my house away from the windows and away from the weather," Watkins said. Tucker says, "It's just not worth it. When storms come, just take shelter. What you're doing is not that important compared to saving your life."
Tue, 06/25/2013 03:00 PM Injured 2 of 2  0.0  Louisville GA 
 USA 
  working on water main    Indirect,Outside,Work 
Tue, 06/25/2013 12:00 PM Injured 2 of 2  0.0  Tewksbury NJ 
 USA 
       
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 24 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 18 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 19 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 10 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 20 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 23 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 7 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 25 of 26 (leader  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:03 PM Injured boy scout 26 of 26 (leader  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 16 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 14 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
GILMANTON, N.H.  After about two dozen Boy Scouts out camping were burned when lightning struck a nearby tree, most returned Tuesday to the leadership program that had had them out braving the elements on a remote New Hampshire hilltop. Two Scouts were still at Concord Hospital as of mid-afternoon but were expected to rejoin the program later in the day, said Gerry Boyle, course director of the national youth leadership program. None of the boys was hit directly by lightning in Mondays storm at Camp Bell, part of the Griswold Hidden Valley Scout Reservation in Gilmanton, a scout spokesman said. The Scouts who returned to camp after their injuries were treated had no scarring or visible signs of their ordeal, Boyle said. The giant pine that was struck was the only physical evidence of their close call. The tree had a visible scar running from its top to the ground, caused when the sap and water inside it boiled and split the tree open. When that bolt hit it shook the ground, said Boyle, who was under another tarp nearby. Another 25 feet and it would have been a whole different story. With about a 15-minute warning from their base camp, the Boy Scouts and their counselors hurriedly gathered under a tarp tied to trees to wait out the approaching storm. The torrential downpour hit first  just before 6 p.m. Monday  then a nearby flash of lightning. The 31 gathered under the tarp were stunned by a booming clap of thunder that followed the lightning strike on the tree barely 30 feet away. Some began to feel burning, tingling sensations about 20 minutes later. Spider-web like marks appeared on the arms and legs of some and a half dozen Scouts  ages 13-17  were transported from the hilltop camping area to the base headquarters of the scout reservation, Boyle said. Boyle suspects the lightening coursed down the 100-foot pine and into its root system, which stretched under the tarp where the Scouts were gathered. Minutes later more Scouts developed the same symptoms and sensations and by nights end, 23 had been transported to area hospitals for treatment and observation. Most were treated and released. Six who went to Concord Hospital were held overnight, Boyle said. Belmont Fire Chief David Parenti, who helped triage the Scouts after they were injured, said Tuesday he was most concerned about six of them whose burns involved the chest area. He said lightning burns typically have an entry and an exit wound, marked by those spidery lines on the skin, which helped the firefighters and EMTs triaging them to identify whose injuries were of most concern. What happened was, with some of the kids, you could see the burn come into the hand, up the arm, across the chest and out the other arm, Parenti said. Thats an entrance and exit that crosses the chest, definitely. The Belmont Fire Department, staffed 24 hours a day, has 12-point heart monitors that were used to assess the Scouts conditions. Parenti said the boys were incredibly calm throughout the ordeal. No one was screaming or yelling. Whatever we asked them to do, they did, Parenti said. Boyle said it helped that the program the Scouts were participating in is an elite one designed to give them skills to go back and lead their troops, and they must complete years of scouting before they can participate. Its participants, he said, come from all over the Eastern seaboard and as far south as Florida. Boyle and Greg Olson, spokesman for the Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of America, would not let a reporter interview the Scouts who had returned to the program Tuesday because they did not have releases from their parents. Scout officials said lightning strikes at camp are not unusual, but not on the scale of Mondays hit. Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 21 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
After about two dozen Boy Scouts out camping were burned when lightning struck a nearby tree, most returned Tuesday to the leadership program that had had them out braving the elements on a remote New Hampshire hilltop. Two Scouts were still at Concord Hospital as of mid-afternoon but were expected to rejoin the program later in the day, said Gerry Boyle, course director of the national youth leadership program. None of the boys was hit directly by lightning in Monday's storm at Camp Bell, part of the Griswold Hidden Valley Scout Reservation in Gilmanton, a scout spokesman said. The Scouts who returned to camp after their injuries were treated had no scarring or visible signs of their ordeal, Boyle said. The giant pine that was struck was the only physical evidence of their close call. The tree had a visible scar running from its top to the ground, caused when the sap and water inside it boiled and split the tree open. "When that bolt hit it shook the ground," said Boyle, who was under another tarp nearby. "Another 25 feet and it would have been a whole different story." With about a 15-minute warning from their base camp, the Boy Scouts and their counselors hurriedly gathered under a tarp tied to trees to wait out the approaching storm. The torrential downpour hit first _ just before 6 p.m. Monday _ then a nearby flash of lightning. The 31 gathered under the tarp were stunned by a booming clap of thunder that followed the lightning strike on the tree barely 30 feet away. Some began to feel burning, tingling sensations about 20 minutes later. Spider-web like marks appeared on the arms and legs of some and a half dozen Scouts _ ages 13-17 _ were transported from the hilltop camping area to the base headquarters of the scout reservation, Boyle said. Boyle suspects the lightening coursed down the 100-foot pine and into its root system, which stretched under the tarp where the Scouts were gathered. Minutes later more Scouts developed the same symptoms and sensations and by night's end, 23 had been transported to area hospitals for treatment and observation. Most were treated and released. Six who went to Concord Hospital were held overnight, Boyle said. Belmont Fire Chief David Parenti, who helped triage the Scouts after they were injured, said Tuesday he was most concerned about six of them whose burns involved the chest area. He said lightning burns typically have an entry and an exit wound, marked by those spidery lines on the skin, which helped the firefighters and EMTs triaging them to identify whose injuries were of most concern. "What happened was, with some of the kids, you could see the burn come into the hand, up the arm, across the chest and out the other arm," Parenti said. "That's an entrance and exit that crosses the chest, definitely." The Belmont Fire Department, staffed 24 hours a day, has 12-point heart monitors that were used to assess the Scouts' conditions. Parenti said the boys were "incredibly calm" throughout the ordeal. "No one was screaming or yelling. Whatever we asked them to do, they did," Parenti said. Boyle said it helped that the program the Scouts were participating in is an elite one designed to give them skills to go back and lead their troops, and they must complete years of scouting before they can participate. Its participants, he said, come from all over the Eastern seaboard and as far south as Florida. Boyle and Greg Olson, spokesman for the Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of America, would not let a reporter interview the Scouts who had returned to the program Tuesday because they did not have releases from their parents. Scout officials said lightning strikes at camp are not unusual, but not on the scale of Monday's hit.
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 22 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured Mike Burns boy scout 10 of 26  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp    Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent 
Thunderstorm Safety Weather News Flash Flood Watch from Noon - Friday A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for western Massachusetts from& Weekend heat wave to bake western US LAS VEGAS (AP) ⬠A high pressure system parking over the West for the weekend and into & E. Long. concert postponed until August It was already postponed one day, and now the East Longmeadow & East US poised for flooding into July Initially, downpours will tend to be isolated and flooding will& Body of NYC storm victim lay& NEW YORK (AP) ⬠In the chaotic days after Superstorm Sandy, an army of aid workers & Weather Photos » Advertisement Lightning strikes scouts Updated: Wednesday, 26 Jun 2013, 12:40 PM EDT Published : Wednesday, 26 Jun 2013, 12:40 PM EDT Lauren Collins GILMANTON, N.H. (NECN) - Boy Scout troop leader Mike Burns heard a large boom and saw a flash of orange and white light. "We knew immediately it was a lightning strike," he says. What wasn't immediately clear Monday night was how many Boy Scouts had soaked up the charge of that strike while huddled under a tarp at Camp Bell in Gilmanton, New Hampshire. "As we came out from under that (tarp), then we noticed on some of the scouts we had soreness and stiffness," says Burns. When the storm cleared, 23 teenaged Scouts and three leaders reported symptoms. The lightening appears to have struck one tree, traveled under the scouts, and left through another tree. Burns watched and felt it, "in my mouth, through my jaw, through my legs. I felt a Charlie horse, especially in my right leg, kind of stiffly drew me together." A nurse and two EMTs on site checked out the injured before they went to area hospitals.
Mon, 06/24/2013 08:30 PM Injured boy scout (1 of 26)  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Lightning hit a Boy Scout camp in Gilmanton, N.H., Monday evening injuring 23 campers, according to the fire chief in nearby Belmont, N.H., whose department responded to the site. Chief David Parenti said most of the concern centered on six of the campers at Griswold Scout Reservation, 87 miles north of Boston, because of the location of burns on their bodies, but the injuries were not serious. The campers and several adults had gathered under a tarp to take shelter from a serious storm, according to Parenti, when lightning struck the tarp. Everyone under the tarp was affected by the strike, he said. The storm was part of a system that swept through Massachusetts, as well. Full story for BostonGlobe.com subscribers. Globe correspondent Haven Orecchio-Egresitz contributed to this report. Nicholas Jacques can be reached at Nicholas.Jacques@Globe.com.
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured Justin Conner, boy scout 15 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Kingston Boy Scout hospitalized for lightning strike Teenager returns to N.H. camp to finish training Zoom Photos Photo/courtesy Colleen North Boy Scout Paul Cook was released from Concord Hospital Tuesday afternoon and returned to Kingston with his family overnight. Here he prepares to return to Camp Bell Wednesday to complete National Youth Leadership Training week. Events Calendar By Kerrin Murray Wicked Local Kingston Posted Jun 28, 2013 @ 07:00 AM Related Stories Boy Scouts back at camp Business News Six Money Saving Tech Tips for Tourists Payroll Debit Cards on the Rise, and so Are Hidden Fees Americans Are Late On Their Auto Payments Suggested Stories Brockton woman charged in shrimp, steak thefts Brockton stabbing suspect held on $1 million bail 3 car accident in downtown Brockton From the Web Ferrari Boss Left Speechless After Seeing The& Motor Authority Oops! Nassau forgets about arrival of giant& USA TODAY Miley Cyrus Wears Underwear on 'Jimmy Kimmel Live' Yahoo! Sponsored contentWhat's this? KINGSTON  Fourteen-year-old Kingston Boy Scout Paul Cook returned to New Hampshire Wednesday after he and two dozen other Boy Scouts and troop leaders were burned when lightning struck a tree near their camp Monday night. They were literally in the middle of a mountain, said Laurie Cook, Pauls mother. She said the troop had knowledge that the storm was approaching and that they planned to wait it out under a tarp, away from their metal-rod tents. She said it was around dinner time when the storm was expected and that they were unable to prepare their meal, because they cook outside. Scouts Paul Cook and Justin Conner of Kingston Troop 199 were attending the National Youth Leadership Training at Camp Bell, in Gilmanton, N.H., according to Troop Scoutmaster Tom North. Laurie Cook said her son and other Scouts were teaching each other to tie different knots in order to make a water balloon catapult. Paul said there were thunderstorms happening each afternoon, but that this particular storm came sooner than expected. At first I didnt really know what had happened, and then I realized it was lightning, he said. Her son, Laurie said, described the strike as just a deafening crash. Just the loudest you could imagine. Paul said he remembers the blinding light as the lightning struck the tree. It just illuminated the whole place, he said. You could see everyones faces, and it was creepy, because everyone had the same gasping, shocked face. He remembers holding his left arm across his chest when the lightning struck and said his left arm and right leg were immobile, but that he could move his other arm around to let people know he was OK. I waved my arm around to let people know that I wasnt knocked out, which did happen to a few kids. But they recovered quickly and they did not stay unconscious, Paul said. Everyone recovered a few minutes after the strike, he said, and they were told to drink water. He spent the night in the hospital and was released around 3 p.m. Tuesday. He returned to Kingston Tuesday and then went back to the camp Wednesday and planned to stay with the rest of his group until Saturday when camp is over. I look forward to getting back and building that balloon catapult, Paul said. I hope it works! Paul said he has burns on the right side of his knee halfway up the back of his thigh, and one from his underarm to his belly button. But, he posted Wednesday on his Facebook page, I am OK, the burns are going away now and probably wont leave any permanent scars. He also responded to ribbing Facebook comments from friends as to whether he had noticed any super powers since the strike. As for superpowers, I have yet to yell SHAZAM, he commented. kmurray@wickedlocal.com Read more: http://www.wickedlocal.com/kingston/news/x986309854/Kingston-Boy-Scout-hospitalized-for-lightning-strike#ixzz2XW2eYg1d Follow us: @enterprisenews on Twitter | EnterpriseBrockton on Facebook
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 16 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 12 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent 
Scouts return to NH camp after lightning scare By LYNNE TUOHY Associated Press Updated: 06/25/2013 06:07:22 PM MDT Click photo to enlarge Scout Leader Gerry Boyle talks about being with a group of Boy Scouts... ((AP Photo/Jim Cole)) 1 2 3 » GILMANTON, N.H.After about two dozen Boy Scouts out camping were burned when lightning struck a nearby tree, most returned Tuesday to the leadership program that had had them out braving the elements on a remote New Hampshire hilltop. Two Scouts were still at Concord Hospital as of mid-afternoon but were expected to rejoin the program later in the day, said Gerry Boyle, course director of the national youth leadership program. None of the boys was hit directly by lightning in Monday's storm at Camp Bell, part of the Griswold Hidden Valley Scout Reservation in Gilmanton, a scout spokesman said. The Scouts who returned to camp after their injuries were treated had no scarring or visible signs of their ordeal, Boyle said. The giant pine that was struck was the only physical evidence of their close call. The tree had a visible scar running from its top to the ground, caused when the sap and water inside it boiled and split the tree open. "When that bolt hit it shook the ground," said Boyle, who was under another tarp nearby. "Another 25 feet and it would have been a whole different story." With about a 15-minute warning from their base camp, the Boy Scouts and their counselors hurriedly gathered under a tarp tied to trees to wait out the approaching storm. The torrential downpour hit firstjust before 6 p.m. Mondaythen a nearby flash of lightning. The 31 gathered under the tarp were stunned by a booming clap of Advertisement thunder that followed the lightning strike on the tree barely 30 feet away. Some began to feel burning, tingling sensations about 20 minutes later. Spider-web like marks appeared on the arms and legs of some and a half dozen Scoutsages 13-17were transported from the hilltop camping area to the base headquarters of the scout reservation, Boyle said. Boyle suspects the lightening coursed down the 100-foot pine and into its root system, which stretched under the tarp where the Scouts were gathered. Minutes later more Scouts developed the same symptoms and sensations and by night's end, 23 had been transported to area hospitals for treatment and observation. Most were treated and released. Six who went to Concord Hospital were held overnight, Boyle said. Belmont Fire Chief David Parenti, who helped triage the Scouts after they were injured, said Tuesday he was most concerned about six of them whose burns involved the chest area. He said lightning burns typically have an entry and an exit wound, marked by those spidery lines on the skin, which helped the firefighters and EMTs triaging them to identify whose injuries were of most concern. "What happened was, with some of the kids, you could see the burn come into the hand, up the arm, across the chest and out the other arm," Parenti said. "That's an entrance and exit that crosses the chest, definitely." The Belmont Fire Department, staffed 24 hours a day, has 12-point heart monitors that were used to assess the Scouts' conditions. Parenti said the boys were "incredibly calm" throughout the ordeal. "No one was screaming or yelling. Whatever we asked them to do, they did," Parenti said. Boyle said it helped that the program the Scouts were participating in is an elite one designed to give them skills to go back and lead their troops, and they must complete years of scouting before they can participate. Its participants, he said, come from all over the Eastern seaboard and as far south as Florida. Boyle and Greg Olson, spokesman for the Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of America, would not let a reporter interview the Scouts who had returned to the program Tuesday because they did not have releases from their parents. Scout officials said lightning strikes at camp are not unusual, but not on the scale of Monday's hit
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 9 of 23  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Earth Networks  WeatherBug Wednesday, June 26, 2013 Email Print Comments (0) Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on gmail More Sharing Services 4 The in-cloud strikes are color-coded in magenta, the cloud-to-ground strikes are in yellow. Typically, there is far more in-cloud lightning than cloud-to-ground lightning. All of the lightning data comes from the Earth Networks Total Lightning Network. The network is made up of hundreds of sophisticated lightning sensors across the country and is the largest network for detecting both cloud-to-ground and in-cloud lightning. The Camp Bell incident occurred during National Lightning Safety Week, which is this week.
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 17 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Near Trees,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Tree,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 02:00 PM Injured person   0.0  Tornbury PA 
 USA 
  working on baseball field    Baseball or Softball,Outside,School,Sports Field,Work 
THORNBURY  A Glen Mills School employee was injured by a lightning strike while working on the school's baseball field, officials said. Emergency crews were sent to the Glen Mills school at about 2 p.m. Monday. Director Edwin Truitt of the emergency services department said a person was reported to be unconscious. A school worker said the employee felt the effects of the lightning strike and an ambulance was called, but the person was able to walk into the ambulance and was taken to a local hospital. No other information about the person was given. The school bills itself as the oldest existing institution of its type in the country and says its mission is to change anti-social behavior and offer delinquents training to turn their lives around. A person reportedly has been struck by lightning on the campus of the Glen Mills School. There also was another report of a tree down trapping people in a car on Spring Valley Road in Concord. A severe thunderstorm warning has been posted for the region until later this afternoon.
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 8 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 13 of 26  15.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tree,Under Trees 
Epic bolt of lightning injures 23 Boy Scouts in one hit 1 day ago There are 23 Boy Scouts out there in line for the "Struck by Lightning" badge. Their troop, aged between 12 and 16, was sheltering in a lean-to at the Camp Bell Boy Scout Camp in Gilmanton, N.H., Monday night when a bolt of lightning caused every one of them of them to suffer electric shock burns. Fire Chief David Parenti said six of the boys suffered "somewhat serious" burns on their chests, though none of the injuries were life-threatening and no one was directly hit. Three counselors were also hurt, though they bravely refused treatment to save ambulance space for their young charges. The Scouts reportedly handled their injuries well, proving they really are prepared for anything. [Source] [Source]
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured Paul Cook, boy scout 3 of 26  14.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
By DAN SEUFERT Union Leader Correspondent and BILL SMITH New Hampshire Union Leader This Daniel Webster Council bus that brought 23 Scouts and three camp counselors to get aid in Belmont after lightning struck their lean-to, burning all of them. (DAN SEUFERT PHOTO) Linked articles: Before storms, it was a good day for a cold soak BELMONT -- Twenty-three Scouts, ages 12-16, and three adult counselors who sought shelter in lean-to suffered electric-shock burns after lightning struck the lean-to at Camp Bell Boy Scout Camp in Gilmanton Monday night. None of the injures were life-threatening; most were minor. Six of the 23 suffered "somewhat serious" burns, Fire Chief David Parenti said. Seven of the Scouts had very minor burns, he said. "All 23 of them had burns of some sort," Parenti said. "But even the six (burn victims), we worry about the chest, but they weren't burned too bad, really." Parenti said he received a call at about 7:30 p.m. from camp officials saying there were numerous campers injured when lightning struck a lean-to. Parenti described the camp's lean-tos as similar to carports. As camp officials loaded the 23 campers into a Daniel Webster Council bus and headed toward the nearest manned fire station in Belmont, Parenti and Lakes Region Mutual Fire Aid Association dispatchers quickly made a plan, calling nearly two-dozen ambulances from area towns to take the victims to various area hospitals. Fire officials declared a second-alarm "Mass Casualties Alert," which starts communication between hospitals  about the number of available beds, for instance  ambulances, and rescue crews. Sometime after 8 p.m., the camp's white bus pulled into the Belmont Fire Department. EMTs and first responders set up a triage system to determine the severity of each child's burn. Officials determined lightning had gone through the lean-to and burned all the occupants. Some of the minor burns were to feet and fingers. The major burns were to the chest area of the six most-injured patients. The Scouts were said to be taking the injuries well. Scouting officials also said the burn victims appeared be doing well. "Everyone was conscious and alert and stable," Daniel Webster Scout Council spokesman Greg Osborne said. The most seriously injured were taken by ambulance to several area hospitals: two were taken to Franklin, two went to Concord, and two went to Lakes Region General Hospital. Other children were taken as far away as Huggins Hospital in Wolfeboro. Three counselors from the group refused treatment to save ambulance space, and were praised by firefighters for doing so. The Scouts came to Camp Bell from all parts of New Hampshire for a leadership conference. Camp Bell is located on Manning Lake in Gilmanton Iron Works. The Griswold Scouting reservation is also home to the Hidden Valley Scout Camp; none of the Hidden Valley campers were affected, officials said. - See more at: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20132506082548_130629507.htm#sthash.MQxVdXCR.dpuf
Mon, 06/24/2013 12:00 PM unknown bad safety from NWS & Ohio  0.0  Columbus OH 
 USA 
  30-30 rule    Bad Safety info 
Summertime is peak time for thunder, lightning storms Monday, June 24, 2013 11:46 AM Lightning Safety Awareness Week is June 23-29 COLUMBUS  In an annual coordinated effort with the National Weather Service, the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness promotes June 23-29 as Lightning Safety Awareness Week and encourages all Ohioans to know what to do before, during and after severe thunder and lightning storms, and to practice severe thunderstorm safety and preparedness throughout the summer. According to the National Weather Service (NWS), to date, there have been seven lightning fatalities this year: two in Florida; two in Illinois; and one each in Louisiana, Missouri and Texas. All were outside; four were in or near bodies of water. A total of 28 people in 17 states died of lightning strikes in 2012, including an Ohio man who was doing yard work at the time. Although the number of lightning fatalities continues to decrease over the years, lightning strikes continue to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States. It is important to note that lightning injures more people than it kills. The best protection from lightning is to avoid the threat. Performing this simple measure can dramatically reduce the chance of severe injury or death during a storm: When thunder roars, go indoors! Stop outdoor activities and seek shelter immediately. Summertime is peak season for thunderstorm activity in Ohio. Preparedness for thunderstorms  or any severe weather incident  is key. " Be Informed. Know what to do before, during and after severe weather. For thunder and lightning safety tips, click on: www.ready.gov/thunderstorms-lightning " Make a Plan. Develop a disaster plan to respond to all hazards, including thunderstorms and lightning. Sign up for First Aid or CPR courses. Practice disaster plans by conducting safety drills. " Build a Kit. Organize or restock emergency supply kits for the home and vehicle to be prepared for any incident. The NWS and Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness also suggest the following lightning safety measures: " Watch for developing thunderstorms  Thunderstorms are most likely to develop on spring or summer days, but can also occur at night and during any season. Listen to local weather reports on radio or television stations. Know the difference between storm watches and warnings. Purchase a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert that notifies when hazardous weather is in or near your area. " Seek shelter before an approaching thunderstorm  Lightning can strike as far as 10 miles away from where its raining. If you can hear thunder, you are within striking distance. Seek immediate shelter. Know the 30/30 Lightning Safety Rule: Go indoors if after seeing lightning you cannot count to 30 before hearing thunder. Stay indoors for 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder. Continue to listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local TV or radio newscasts for weather updates. " Protect your pets  Outside dog houses are not lightning-safe. Dogs that are chained to trees or wire runners have no protection from lightning. Bring your pets inside during thunderstorms. " Minimize your risk  Most lightning strikes occur during the summer when people are participating in outdoor recreational activities. At the first clap of thunders, stop outdoor activities and try to find indoor shelter immediately. If swimming, boating or fishing, get away from the water as quickly as possible. Find shelter in a substantial building (such as a home, school, office building or shopping center) or a hard-topped vehicle. Picnic shelters, car ports, baseball dugouts and convertible vehicles are not safe shelters during thunder and lightning storms. Do not use electrical equipment. Stay away from water/plumbing sources. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last sound of thunder before going outside again. " Helping someone struck by lightning  If a person is struck by lightning, call 911 and seek immediate medical attention. A lightning victim does not carry an electrical charge and is safe to touch. Knowing and implementing first aid measures, which include cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), can help a person struck by lightning survive. Local American Red Cross chapters and fire departments often offer first aid and CPR classes. For additional information on lightning safety, visit the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness site at www.weathersafety.ohio.gov or the NWS site at www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov.
Mon, 06/24/2013 07:30 PM Injured boy scout 4 of 26  0.0  Gilmanton NH 
 USA 
  under a tarp  N/A  Boy Scouts,Burnt,Camping,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter,Tent,Under Trees 
By Skyler Cooper The scouts were struck by the lightening while trying to take shelter from a thunderstorm. The 23 scouts and three adults were taken to the hospital to be treated for burns. Some burns were minor, but a few of the scouts received serious burns to the chest. None of the injuries are life threatening, but six of the scouts remain in the hospital for cardiac monitoring since they were burned on the chest. Firefighters were impressed with the scouts throughout the situation because they remained so calm. The troop was at Griswold Scout Reservation in New Hampshire last night when the lightening hit either a canopy or the ground.

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