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Sat, 08/10/2013 12:00 PM Killed 1 dead, 6 injured  0.0  Thambuttegama  
 Sri Lanka 
       
One dead, six injured in lightning bolt SATURDAY, 10 AUGUST 2013 12:21 One woman was killed and six others of the same family injured after they were struck with a bolt of lightning at Thambutthegama in the Anuradhapura District yesterday, police said today. They said the injured that were taken to the Anuradhapura Hospital included three women and three male. A 12-year-old boy was also among the injured. The victims were harvesting paddy on an open field in poor weather when the incident took place, according to police
Sat, 08/10/2013 04:00 PM Injured daughter, 2 of 2  0.0  Gilmer TX 
 USA 
  near window in living room  N/A  Indirect,Indoors,Window 
Sat, 08/10/2013 12:00 AM Killed Sosito Flores  36.0  Zamboanga Sibugay 
 Philippines 
       
Lightning hits fishpond dike, 1 dies -AA+A Saturday, August 10, 2013 A 36-YEAR-OLD man was killed when lightning struck a remote village in the province of Zamboanga Sibugay, the police reported Saturday. Killed by the lightning strike was Sosito Flores, 36, a resident of Timuay Danda village, Kabasalan, Zamboanga Sibugay, according to Zamboanga Peninsula police spokesman Chief Inspector Ariel Huesca. Huesca said the incident took place around 1 p.m. Wednesday at a fish pond in the village of Sta. Cruz, Kabasalan town. Investigations showed that Flores was together with his brother walking along the dike amidst heavy rains on the way to transfer fingerlings when lightning suddenly struck hitting the victim. Flores brother was unharmed, the police. (Bong Garcia/Sunnex)
Fri, 08/09/2013 12:00 PM unknown coral gables  0.0  Coral Gables FL 
 USA 
  detection system    Education 
emailprintcommentreprints CORAL GABLES Coral Gables elementary school plugs into lightning detection IF YOU GO What: Unveiling of WeatherBug lightning detection system When: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Where: St. Thomas Episcopal Parish School, 5692 N. Kendall Dr., Coral Gables Information: 305-665-4851 BY HOWARD COHEN HCOHEN@MIAMIHERALD.COM Frank Veloso remembers the athletic fields at West Miami-Dades Christopher Columbus High School with much affection, but also apprehension. Years before Velosos 1994 graduation, Columbus student Julio Portela was struck by lightning and killed while practicing with the schools football team. Portelas death in 1975, long memorialized at the school with a plaque, touched Veloso personally. Portela was Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenezs uncle. Veloso, now 36, was a childhood friend of the Gimenez family. While Veloso was at Columbus, in 1991, a bolt of lightning struck three coaches and a player at South Miami High during football practice on a gloomy August day, killing assistant coach Robert Johnson. These incidents introduced Veloso to the power of lightning. Now that Veloso is a parent of two boys, ages 7 and 4, he, along with wife Christina, have donated $5,000 to underwrite the cost of a lightning detection system for St. Thomas Episcopal Parish, a pre-K to fifth grade school in Coral Gables that their children attend. Whats worse for a parent than getting a phone call and them saying, Your child has been in an accident. This is something that can be prevented, Veloso said. I thought for my kids and anyone on a PE field or park or on the beach, this can happen anywhere. Im trying to do my small part to bring awareness to something that can be done through the state of Florida, the lightning capital of the U.S.A.. On Thursday morning, St. Thomas will unveil the WeatherBug lightning detection system to parents, staff and the community. The WeatherBug system, manufactured by Maryland-based Earth Networks, is considered a total lightning system, meaning it tracks cloud-to-ground lightning strikes as well as in-cloud strikes which can serve as an advance warning that a storm threatens, said Frank McCathran, director of enterprise solutions at WeatherBug. The WeatherBug sends web-based alerts via text, email and to computers so administrators at the school can track storms direction and intensity and can then bring students inside. WeatherBug is the same company that markets an app via the Apple Store that many users have on their smart phones to check weather conditions. The system before was manual, says St. Thomas head of school Kris Matteson Charlton, meaning coaches and staff made a decision on when to bring students inside by observing conditions and often applying the typical count between the sound of thunder and flash of lightning to determine its distance. The rule of thumb is that for every five seconds between the lightning and thunder, the lightning is a mile away. Count to 20, for instance, and the lightning is four miles away. The problem is that lightning can strike outward from a thunderstorm about 10 miles and thats about the distance that you can hear the thunder, said John Jensenius, a lightning safety specialist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). We dont do any analysis or testing of the systems so that we can say how effective the various types of systems are. However, in terms of lightning detection it is something we do recommend if people can use the lightning detection system in addition to listening for thunder and watching for darkening skies, Jensenius said. The good thing with this technology, in the case of the WeatherBug, is that it is a total lightning system, he said. It captures in-cloud lightning as well as cloud-to-ground and that usually gives you a little extra time before cloud-to-ground lightning. One of the real benefits is that if you need extra time to get people to a safe place, this allows you to monitor approaching or developing storms and get a heads-up on any lightning activity. Charlton likes the technological addition as opposed to just counting between light and rumble which depends on personal interpretation of what you hear and see. This high-level technology component takes out the human element and is going to help the teachers and administrators to keep the children safe. According to researchers at the University of Florida, the state ranks No. 1 in deaths due to lightning, 94-percent of which occur between late May and the end of September. An average of 100 people are killed in the United States annually with 10 to 13 of those deaths occurring in Florida. Almost 600 are injured, 30 in Florida. The most prevalent area runs from St. Augustine north to Lake Okeechobee south. Lightning kills more people in the United States than hurricanes and tornados combined, the university reports. Veloso, who runs the Chevron gas station on Southwest Eighth Street and 22nd Avenue, which has been in his family since the 1960s, decided to underwrite the WeatherBug after touring the school during its capital campaign project about a year ago. Said Veloso, Giving parents, my neighbors and total strangers the peace of mind that their children and others are in a safe environment is priceless. Follow @HowardCohen on Twitter. Read more here: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20130908071846_coral-gables-elementary-school.html.htm#storylink=cpy
Fri, 08/09/2013 12:00 PM Killed 2 dead  0.0   
 India 
       
READ MORE Lightning strikes|lightning deaths|Jagatsinghpur Lightning Deaths RELATED PARADIP: Two people were killed and two minor girls seriously injured in separate lightning incidents in Odisha's Jagatsinghpur district, police said on Friday. Jitendra Yadav (42) a daily labourer working in an oil company at Paradipgarh and Manjulata Mana (29) of Kusupur village under Balikuda block died in separate lightning incidents on Thursday. Mamata Murmu of class V1 and Jamuna Majhi of class V11 of Ersama government school were seriously injured when lightning struck the verandah they were standing in their school. Both were admitted to the SCB Medical Collage and hospital at Cuttack.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 3 of 7  0.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
Lightning killed four people and injured eleven others in four separate districts yesterday and the day before. It struck Ashok Biswas, 30, while he was cutting paddy at around 10:00am at Raghunathpur in Gopalganj district, said Md. Zakir Hossain, officer in-charge of Gopalganj Police Station. He was sent to the Gopalganj General Hospital where doctor on duty declared him dead. In Madaripur, Yunus Hawlader, 65, and his daughter Roksana Begum of Kismandi village were in the kitchen when a lightning struck them, leaving Yunus dead and Roksana injured. A farmer of village Bahadurpur in the district, was also injured in lightning while working at his farmland. In Brahmanbaria, a farm labourer was killed as a lightning struck him at Jazisar village in Kasba upazila on Saturday, reports our correspondent. The deceased was identified as Mantu Mia, 28, of Chaktir village in Taraganj upazila of Rangpur district. Another farmer sustained injures while working on a land belonging to Jamal Mia at about 11am. They were rushed to upazila health complex where doctors declared Mantu dead. In Sunamganj, a man was killed and two others were injured by a lightning strike at Gazaria village in Jamalganj upazila early Saturday. The deceased was identified as Wasim, 22, son of Abdul Muttalib of the village. Locals said, Wasim died on the spot when a lightning struck him during rain in the morning. Two others  Jamal Hossain and Kamal Hossain  were injured as the same lightning hit them. They were admitted to Jamalganj upazila health complex.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 1 of 7  0.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair    Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
By COLIN DEPPEN Era Reporter c.deppen@bradfordera.com | 0 comments Seven people were shocked ⬠two of them severely enough to be taken to the hospital ⬠when lighting struck at the Elk County Fair on Thursday, according to fair president Ann Distler.  It was shortly after 6 p.m. when Fox Township ambulances were dispatched to the fairgrounds for Emergency Operating System reports of an â¬Selectrocution/lightning.⬝  Distler said it was between acts at the fairâ¬"s Star Pavilion when a single lightning strike traveled through a group of fairgoers who were standing by the stage talking.Â
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 4 of 7  0.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
ublished on May 4, 2012 by slatester Those bolts of lightning during a thunderstorm may do more than just light up the night sky and scare the bejeebers out of the dog, they could help us understand the origins of our solar system. The incessant flashes of lightning here on Earth - some 50 blasts around the globe each second - cause a pulse of electromagnetic waves known as the Schumann Resonance. The signature of this rhythm can reveal not only the size of the planet, but the chemical composition of its atmosphere, better than other known techniques. And now with the discovery of a way to measure the Schumann Resonance from above our planet rather than on its surface, a paper published this week in The Astrophysical Journal describes how orbiting spacecraft could be used to find the pulse on neighboring planets. By studying this collected data, researchers may be able to discover more about the birth of our solar system and the makeup of it's original nebula. You might say this discovery was, literally, a bolt from the blue.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 5 of 7  32.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
Mahanama Vithanage - Malwana group correspondent A mother of three died after being struck by lightning while charging a mobile phone. This was revealed at the inquest held on the death of Niluka Damayanthi Perera, 32, of Piliyandala by Inquirer into Sudden Deaths, Kirindiwela, P W Amarasekara. The inquirer recorded a verdict of accidental death. Kirindiwela police led evidence.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 7 of 7  0.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
Lightning kills three mourners Sunday, 26th June, 2011 E-mail article Print article Lightning kills three mourners By Moses Nampala, Patrick Okino and Gerald Tenywa LIGHTNING instantly killed three mourners and left 15 others injured at a burial in Alebtong district on Saturday afternoon. The mourners were at the burial of Hellen Opio who had died at Lira Regional Referral Hospital. The injured were rushed to Alebtong Health Centre IV, Lira Regional Referral Hospital and Lira Medical Centre. Moses Isaac Opio, a teacher at Omele Primary School identified the dead as Margaret Acen, a resident of Teyao village, James Awio of Tebungadwong and Tonny Abwango of Apiingic. They had sought shelter under a tree during the rain. The injured include Stella Moro, Moses Okwir, Hellen Atepo, Sam Okar and Olanya Moses. Others are Aida Anam, Margaret Okullo and Ambrose Obua, a primary four pupil of Omele primary school. In a similar incident in Tororo, a casual labourer was killed and another severely injured at Mailo-eight village, in Mukujju sub-county. Tororo district deputy officer in charge of crime Michael Muwanga identified the deceased as Jacob Ochwo. A post-mortem examination indicated that the victim sustained severe burns on the head. The injured identified as Peter Olwenyi was rushed to Tororo hospital. By the time New Vision visited Olwenyi, he had recovered from shock and was nursing severe burns on the back. The Police said the victims were part of a group of 80 casual labourers hired to dig a trench on the Tororo- Mbale highway for an underground cable belonging to Airtel, a mobile telecom company. According to the Police, the labourers had lined up for supper at their residence during a drizzle when lightning struck. Last week, three people, including two children from one family, were killed by lightning during an afternoon downpour in Jinja. Eight other pupils were injured. The children were pupils of Nawangoma primary school in Budondo sub-county. They were hit while attending afternoon lessons. The deceased were identified as Denis Kironde, 15, Nelson Kalyabi, 14, and Irene Isabirye. The injured included Cyrus Wakooli, 13, Bitu Tibaidhukira, 12, Rose Awori, 10, Mariam Kutesa, 10 and Alice Ali, 13. Lightning also killed three people in Mbarara and Kamwenge districts. Two of them had sought shelter under a tree during an afternoon drizzle. They were identified as Falouk Basiiime and Didas Gumirensi. The third victim, identified as Jolly Nalongo, was killed in Kamwenge. Scientists have linked lightning and thunder to the sudden expansion and contraction of air. Aloysius Kagoro, a retired meteorologist, says air masses (cumulous and cumulos-nimbus clouds) moving in opposite directions cause heat the same way human hands can generate heat when rubbed against each other. The warm air expands and in the process increases in volume and occupies more space. It encounters cold air and contracts, according to Kagoro. The sudden expansion of air causes an explosion called thunder. When the sound waves (thunder) are being transmitted, they encounter cold air and generate an electric discharge which moves towards the earth, Kagoro says. This, he points out, is what has to be managed because lightning connects to earth through high points such as trees, buildings, human beings and animals. Kagoro says lightning can blind pilots or disrupt the hearing aids of an aeroplane. He says areas around lakes are among the high risk areas. The water vapour rises after being heated by sunlight rays to form the rain making cumulous and cumulo-nimbus clouds. Kagoro says lightning strikes are common at the beginning of the rainy season because there is a lot of energy build-up in the air. Sissy Nakalema, a resident of Mengo, a Kampala suburb, said the sound of thunder is disturbing. She blocks her ears the moment she sees lightning flash across the sky. But scientists say this may not be enough to avoid the hazards of lightning, which is increasingly claiming lives. But Marx Kabi, a natural resource management specialist with the National Forestry Authority, blames lightning strikes on massive defforestation. People have cut down trees which are used to absorb or provide a channel for transmitting lightning, says Kabi.
Thu, 08/08/2013 12:00 PM Injured Justin Jopes  15.0  Sawyer IL 
 USA 
  leaving water because of storm  N/A  Beach,Ground Strike,Outside,Taking Shelter 
osted: Thursday, August 8, 2013 6:00 am By JULIE SWIDWA - HP Staff Writer | 0 comments SAWYER - Park rangers warned swimmers to get out of the water at Warren Dunes State Park on Wednesday as a storm packing along lightning swept through the southern part of Berrien County. Baroda-Lake Township Police Chief Shawn Martin said a 15-year-old boy might have been hit by lightning in a parking lot near the beach. He was taken to Lakeland Regional Medical Center in St. Joseph, Martin said. He did not know the boy's name, or his condition at the hospital. Martin said the boy is from Naperville, Ill. and was at Warren Dunes with his family and friends. The boy was standing near the back of the family's SUV when family members heard a loud boom, Martin said. "The next thing they knew he was on the ground, curled up in a fetal position," the chief said. He said the boy was breathing when he was taken to the hospital by ambulance. Martin said park rangers did not know whether the boy was struck directly or if lightning struck the vehicle and the boy was touching it. Email: jswidwa@TheHP.com Twitter: @HPSwidwa Possible State Park lightning strike victim recovers By Julie Swidwa For the News Published: Wednesday, August 14, 2013 4:15 PM EDT SAWYER  Park rangers warned swimmers to get out of the water at Warren Dunes State Park on Wednesday, Aug. 7, as a storm packing along lightning swept through the southern part of Berrien County. Baroda-Lake Township Police Chief Shawn Martin said a 15-year-old boy might have been hit by lightning in a parking lot near the beach. Martin said Justin Jopes, 15, of Naperville, Ill., was evaluated at Lakeland Regional Medical Center, St. Joseph, after he collapsed to the ground behind his familys vehicle at the beach. The family had heard a loud boom near the vehicle where Justin had been standing, leading them to believe the boy suffered a lightning strike. The next thing they knew he was on the ground, curled up in a fetal position, Martin said. Martin said the boys mother told him Thursday that tests done at Lakeland showed that Justin did not suffer a direct lightning strike. He was released from the hospital after being evaluated, the mother said.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 2 of 7  57.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
The Straits Times www.straitstimes.com Singapore Home > Breaking News > Singapore > Story Jul 12, 2010 Golfer's death a misadventure By Elena Chong, Court Correspondent A CORONER on Monday recorded a verdict of misadventure on the death of a golfer 10 days after he was struck by lightning at Tanah Merah Country Club (TMCC). Mr Soh Lye Huat, 57, a businessman, was playing golf with three friends at the Changi Coast Road club last Oct 25 when he was thrown to the ground. His friends, too, were thrown to the ground. Earlier, the four had reached the 17th hole when they saw flashes of lightning at the far end horizon and heard thunder roaring. As there was no siren for the lightning alert from TMCC, they decided to finish the 17th hole before ending their game. Mr Soh was the last to putt at about 10.10am when a loud bang was heard. Mr Soh was found lying face down and bleeding from his mouth. The back portion of his cap was shredded. Two of his friends, together with a golf marshal, applied cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on Mr Soh till the ambulance arrived. He remained in intensive care at Changi General Hospital until his death from multi-organ failure on Nov 4.
Thu, 08/08/2013 06:00 PM Injured at fair, 6 of 7  24.0  Elk County PA 
 USA 
  at fair  N/A  Festival,Ground Strike,Outside 
Lightning strike kills three Cambodian fishermen May 7, 2010, 3:53 GMT Phnom Penh - Three Cambodian brothers died when their fishing boat was hit by lightning off the southern coastal town of Kampot, national media reported Friday. Commune police chief Kouch Chansuy told the Cambodia Daily newspaper that the body of Mao Morn, 24, was found in the fishing boat after it was hit by lightning early Wednesday. The body of the eldest brother was found floating in the sea, while the third brother is missing believed dead, the police chief said. 'Police assume that metal tools and a radio antenna attracted the lightning,' he said. A fourth man also died this week when he was hit by lightning while using his mobile phone in his hut in central Kampong Chhnang province, raising the death toll from lightning to 19 since March 1. In a separate incident a single lightning bolt killed 18 cattle in central Cambodia on Tuesday, while another killed seven more cattle in the same district, officials in Kampong Thom province said. Cambodia is nearing the end of the annual hot season, when storms accompanied by lightning strikes become more common. Figures from the government's disaster management committee showed that 140 people were killed by lightning last year, up from 95 people in 2008.
Wed, 08/07/2013 12:00 PM Killed Uganda: Seven Students Hospitalized After Lightnin  0.0   
 Uganda 
       
Hoima  Seven students of Mandela Secondary School remain hospitalized at EDPA Medical Centre, Hoima town after they were struck by lightning during heavy rains Monday night. No lives were claimed. The incident occurred while students were in class for the evening prep session at around 9.00pm local time, some of them said. A few of their friends, who include the seven admitted, fainted from the lighting strike. A student found attending to the injured students at the health facility told New Vision on Tuesday that the victims fainted from a thunderous bang following the lighting. They were later rushed to the medical centre for treatment. Most parts of the country are receiving heavy rains following a long dry spell in the recent months. People living in high-risk areas - prone to landslides and floods - have been warned to take caution. An official from the meteorological department has said the rains would continue until October. Albertine region police spokesperson, Lydia Tumushabe sounded reports by the school head of Mandela Secondary school that the Monday night incident revolved around a loud bang. Headteacher Francis Nzigu said the students fainted following a loud bang. The police spokeswoman said most of the affected students had a history of Asthma and heart attack, and that they only suffered shock, which could have caused them to fall down. She identified some of the students as Florence Murungi (S.2), Juliet Nanbunya (S.2) and Julian Baker Kabateremwa (S.3) who is reportedly to be in critical condition. Others affected were Sheila Kimuli (S.3), Gloria Katushabe (S.3), Brendah Nyakojo (S.1) and Helen Murungi of S.1. Emanuel Agaba, a staffer at the hospital who was on duty that night, said that by the time the students were brought to the health facility, most of them had slumped into unconsciousness. He said others could have been injured as they struggled through a stampede out of the classroom. Police's Tumushabe urged the public not to move bare-footed during rainy weather and also consider wearing rubber-soled footwear. The Albertine region is one of the areas highly prone to lightning strikes. The police publicist called on schools and churches to install lightning conductors on their building to reduce risk of injury and worst, death. She warned that police will have to deal with schools which do not conform with the education ministry's policy on lighting conductor installation on buildings.
Wed, 08/07/2013 12:00 PM Injured Lightning strikes person sitting in car in Simcoe   0.0  Simcoe county  
 Canada 
  in a car    In a car 
As thunderstorms rolled through much of Southern Ontario Wednesday evening, one person in Simcoe County was struck by lightning. Emergency services were dispatched to St. Vincent St. in Midhurst at 7:07 p.m. where lightning had struck a car while a man was inside. The man, who has not been identified, was sent to hospital and treated for minor burns. According to Environment Canada, lightning strikes injure between 100 and 150 people and kill 9 to ten people every year.
Sun, 08/04/2013 12:00 PM Injured man fishing   0.0   
 UK 
  fishing     fishing,Outside 
A man fishing during a thunderstorm last week was knocked out after his rod was struck by lightning. His friend, who came to help, had his front teeth broken when the shock caused the victim's arms to flail about uncontrollably. Apart from a few dead fish in the lake, the damaged teeth and a lost rod and line the two men lived to tell the tale. Most people who have close encounters with lightning also survive, although frequently with some loss of hearing or sight. The chances of getting killed by lightning in the UK are 15 million to one, although men are six times more likely to be victims than women. This is because men are daft enough to continue to play golf, cricket and football during a storm or carry on hiking or fishing, while women seek shelter. A hundred years ago, when men and women both worked in the open air harvesting crops, the death toll between the sexes was about the same. This is the peak season for thunderstorms with the south and east more likely to get an average of two or three days of storms in August, more than the cooler north. Lightning frightens people but thunderstorms can be violent in other ways, with hail and flash flooding. Although the number of thunderstorms does not seem to have increased, flash flooding incidents certainly have. More intense rainfall is partly to blame but urban sprawl and more hard surfaces increases the risk.
Sun, 08/04/2013 12:00 PM Killed Two football fans among 5 five killed in lightning  0.0   
 India 
  at stadium    Sports Field 
At least five persons, including two football fans, were killed today and as many seriously injured after being struck by lightning in separate incidents in Odisha. Lightning struck the stadium at Jalda on the outskirts of Rourkela when a football match was going on in an overcast sky between Rourkela and Jalda. As the spectators were enjoying the match, a lightning struck the east side of the gallery killing two persons on the spot and leaving five others unconscious, police said. The injured were immediately shifted to Rourkela Government Hospital where their condition was stated to be stable, hospital sources said. In the other incidents, three women were killed after being struck by lightning while working in their farm land in Puri district today, police said. While two women belonging to Ura village under Puri Sadar police station died while busy in farming work, another woman fell to the natural phenomena near Dalanai village under Gop police station under similar circumstances. Besides, many electronics and electrical appliances were damaged under the impact of the lighting during heavy rains in the area, sources said.
Sat, 08/03/2013 08:00 PM Killed Joseph Higgins  53.0  Elgin Ontario 
 Canada 
  taking shelter under a cottage  N/A  Ground Strike,Indirect,Outside,Porch,Taking Shelter 
ELGIN - A boating trip in Rideau Lakes cottage country turned tragic Saturday night when a New Jersey man was killed by lightning. Joseph Higgins, 53, of Mickleton, N.J., was pronounced dead at the scene shortly after the incident around 8 p.m., said Sgt. Glen King of the Ontario Provincial Police's Leeds County detachment. It was just a freak accident, said King. Higgins and his daughter were out boating on Clear Lake, near Elgin, when Saturday night's thunderstorm hit and the pair made it back to shore, said the sergeant. He tried to take shelter, him and his daughter, underneath a cottage and he was struck by lightning on land. Higgins was underneath the cottage because it was not his and he could not get inside, added King. Tragically, the cottage appears to have been built of a conductive material, he added. It (lightning) struck the building and then went down and struck him subsequently. Higgins's daughter, who is in her early 20s, was not hurt, said King. Police have concluded their investigation, he added.
Sat, 08/03/2013 12:00 PM unknown Justin Inversso  0.0  Adventure Island FL 
 USA 
  legal lawsuit    Legal 
Adventure Island sued in staffer's death Photos By Ray Reyes | Tribune Staff Published: August 3, 2013 TAMPA - The family of a lifeguard killed by lightning at Adventure Island two years ago is suing the water park for negligence, saying park employees did not heed the alarms of a weather monitoring system and failed to shut down rides. The suit, filed Monday in Tampa, seeks damages of more than $15,000 in the death of Justin Savers Inversso and names Adventure Island, its parent company SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment, and an employee of the water park as defendants. Inversso, who turned 21 the day before his death, was working 700 feet above ground on the Key West Rapids ride on Sept. 10, 2011, when a storm rolled through the area. He was standing in 2 or 3 feet of water evacuating patrons when struck by lightning, authorities said. He was taken out of the water by co-workers and given CPR. He died at a local hospital. Park employees did not follow protocol and failed to "shut down any of the park's rides in response to the alarms" emitted by the lightning detection system, the lawsuit states. Between 10:14 and 11:34 a.m. that day, the equipment detected "nine separate instances of lightning strikes within zero to five miles of the park," the complaint said. "At 11:44 a..m., there were seven simultaneous lightning strikes at respective distances of two, seven, 1.2, 1.8, 2.6, three and 3.8 miles from the entrances of Adventure Island. At 11:44 a.m., Justin Savers Inversso was struck by lightning and killed." The lawsuit also claims that when the system detects lightning within 5 miles of the park, the park policy requires an operations supervisor monitor the weather "at some visible outside location" and shut down rides. The lawsuit said Michael Penzato, the operations supervisor on shift that day, "consciously failed to shut down the Key West Rapids ride as required" by procedures after being made aware of "the alarm of lighting strikes within five miles of the park." A spokesman for Busch Gardens, which is affiliated with Adventure Island, declined to comment because the lawsuit is pending. Last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration fined the water park $7,000, saying employees did not follow procedures in shutting down rides as the thunderstorm approached the area, thus placing Inversso in the path of a fatal lightning strike. The OSHA report lists the violation as "serious" and says employees were "not informed to initiate rides shut-down" when the park's monitoring systems indicated lightning within 5 miles of the park. The report also recommended employees receive more training on how to interpret and assess lightning strike data recorded by the park's weather monitoring system and improving communications between employees during an approaching storm. OSHA recommended Adventure Island "re-evaluate time required to evacuate guests from rides, especially when employees are the last to evacuate and seek shelter." In a statement the day after Inversso's death, park officials said the fatal lightning strike was the first since the water park opened in 1980. rreyes@tampatrib.com (813) 259-7920 Twitter:@TBORay - See more at: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20130308080627_park-sued-in-staffers-death-adventure-island-lifeguard-hit-by-lightning-in-2011-20130803.htm#sthash.pcukprP9.dpuf
Sat, 08/03/2013 01:00 PM Injured Jethro Alfonzo  0.0  Miami FL 
 USA 
  leaving motocross track because of lightning    Motorcycle,Outside,Taking Shelter 
MIAMI (CBSMiami)  A motocross rider was reportedly struck by lightning while riding on a track at the Miami Motorsports Park, Saturday. It happened around 1:00 p.m. at the track located at 16665 Krome Avenue. Witnesses said the riders were leaving the track because of a lightning. As they were doing so, they said a rider named Jethro Alfonzo was struck. We saw the lightning and the guy fell from the bike, said Nicholas Stankov, a motocross instructor. Alfonzo was taken to Jackson Memorial Hospital by air.
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 AM Injured soldier, 5 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter  N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
xx
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 2 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter    Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
FORT CARSON, Colo. (AP) - All of the Fort Carson soldiers who were taken to hospitals after a lightning strike at a training area this week have been released. Officials at the Army post had said 12 soldiers were taken to hospitals after lightning struck Wednesday. Ten were released that evening. The Gazette reports the two soldiers still in the hospital had been sent home Friday. Army officials have said the soldiers were outside training but were heading toward shelter when the lightning struck. (Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
Wed, 07/31/2013 12:00 PM unknown Is lightning the best indicator of severe thunders  0.0   
 USA 
  science    Education,Science 
Can lightning predict the severity of a thunderstorm? The short answer: Sometimes, yes; sometimes, no. Lightning arises from a specific combination of factors in a storm cell, not necessarily the same elements that breed severe weather. Here we explore why some of the deadliest storm cells may or may not produce meaningful lightning activity. Lightning detection and warning: An imperfect science Thunderstorms generate a variety of severe weather: Damaging wind gusts, large hail, flash floods, intense lightning, and tornadoes. The National Weather Service officially defines a severe thunderstorm if wind gusts exceed 58 mph and/or hail exceeds one inch diameter. Flash floods are covered under a separate warning. Ditto for tornadoes. However, there is presently NO warning criteria for a cell that generates unusually frequent lightning strikes. Such storms are inherently dangerous, causing utility outages, fatalities and house fires  even if no other form of severe weather results. Several sensor networks monitor lightning activity in thunderstorms. Two of most well-known, and widely distributed, are Earth Networks Total Lightning Network (TLN) and the U.S. National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The Earth Networks TLN consists of nearly 700 sensors. The majority of these are in the U.S., but the network has expanded into Canada, Mexico and 40 other countries. Its lightning sensors detect both in-cloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG) activity. Heres an animation of the TLN detecting a surge in lightning activity as the June 29, 2012 derecho moves into western Virginia. The NLDN detects cloud-to-ground (CG) discharges, based on an array of 100 ground sensors that monitor electromagnetic radiation emitted by lightning strokes. The NLDN provides location, time, and polarity of individual strikes. The data are processed by Vaisala, Inc. in Tucson, Arizona. An example of lightning strike density for a Washington-area thunderstorm, based on NLDN, is shown below. NLDN map of CG strikes for a squall line approaching D.C. on the evening of July 7, 2013. Colors indicate strike times. The NLDN detected hundreds of CGs associated with this line. (Screen capture from Weathertap.com) Recently, novel techniques using GPS technology and radio emissions (60 MHz) have enabled extremely precise, ultra-fast, and more complete lightning detection. A type of experimental system called the Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) is being tested in select regions of the U.S., including the Washington-Baltimore corridor. The LMAs are jointly funded by NASA and NOAA, with research conducted at several universities. LMAs provide 3D lightning mapping and can resolve individual lightning channels fanning through the storm cloud. LMAs measure total lightning, which includes both CG and intracloud (IC) discharges. An example of the LMAs lightning mapping capabilities is shown below. LMA map of total lightning for the same squall line depicted in Figure 1. Colors indicate lightning density (discharges per 2 km x 2 km pixel). The LMA measured nearly 200,000 discharges during this storm and accurately pinpointed dangerous lightning hot spots. (NASA) Related: Next generation lightning and cloud data highlight tornado-producing storms in Md. | Can lightning help predict tornadoes? A D.C. area case may shed some light | Lightning gone wild during Washington D.C.s derecho | Dissecting a derecho bolt: more to lightning than meets the eye (and camera lens) | Saturday nights extreme lightning show north of Washington, D.C. When lightning provides useful guidance on storm severity Some types of severe convective storms produce CG discharges, while others do not. When lightning does occur, a storms lightning flash rate (number of flashes per minute) is a useful indicator of a storms intensity. As lightning production ramps up, the cloud updraft enters its most vigorous phase. The most intense updrafts generate large hail. Total lightning, as obtained by the LMA, is often a better indicator of a thunderstorms intensity level. Studies have noted a several-fold increase in IC lightning, relative to CG lighting, in tornadic storm cells. Curiously, a prominent lightning hole  a small, doughnut-shaped region free of lightning  pinpoints the location of a supercells mesocyclone. Mesocyclones are a precursor to strong and violent tornadoes. A number of studies have also correlated a sharp rise in lightning intensity with imminent onset of severe weather, including tornadoes and downburst winds. There is usually a time lag between the abrupt rise in lightning frequency, called a lightning jump, and these high winds. The lag is typically tens of minutes. The lag may be tied to the sequential pulsing of intense updraft and downdraft phases in a storm cell. First comes the updraft phase, when a large mass of precipitation forms aloft. As explained below, this is tied to a fast rise in cloud electrification. The downdraft phase follows on its heels, as the heavy core of precipitation descends. When the cell collapses, downburst winds surge across the ground. Additionally, strong tornadoes initiate near the surface, where the downdraft wraps around the mesocyclone. When lightning is not a useful severe storm detector Cloud electrification requires a mixed phase region in the storm cloud. This is a cloud layer between 0 (32 °F) and -20 °C (-4 °F), containing high concentrations of supercooled water, small ice crystals and large, rimed ice particles. Rimed ice is otherwise known as graupel, a type of mushy, opaque ice pellet. The jostling of these particles in a strong updraft leads to charge induction and formation of an electrical field. Radar studies using polarimetric doppler have shown that without a dense mix of ice and supercooled water, a convective cloud is electrically quiet. But the absence of this layer does not preclude severe weather. In fact, one of our nations leading weather killers, flash floods (#2 behind heat waves), are most commonly generated by summertime convective clouds. A number of recent floods  including the June 27, 1995 Madison County, VA flash flood, and July 27, 1997 Ft. Collins, Colorado events  were produced by thunderstorm complexes largely devoid of lightning. The Madison County storm was anchored to high terrain (the foothills of the Blue Ridge) and remained stationary over its lifetime. It dumped an incredible 24 inches of rain in 8 hours over a small region near Ruckersville. The ensuing mudslides and debris flows killed three, inundated 80 bridges and damaged or destroyed 2000 homes. This flash flood defines the record discharge for a stream east of the Mississippi River! Detailed radar studies indicate that the Madison County storm lacked a mixed-phase region. Heavy rain formed principally by warm-cloud processes i.e. growth of rain drops by collision-coalescence, which occurs at temperatures warmer than freezing, near the base of the cloud. This type of rain-making process is characteristic of tropical thunderstorms, and is highly efficient. Tropical thunderstorms, including those in hurricanes, are well known for their deluges, but seldom produce lightning. Without CG lightning on the NLDN display, the Madison County storm cell appeared quite benign. Meteorologists had to rely on radar indicators, rain gauge and spotter reports to warn for this highly destructive flash flood. The bottom line: Decoding lightning, or lack thereof A meteorologist must use ALL tools available  including Doppler radar, NLDN, LMA, and satellite  to accurately judge a thunderstorms severity. Lightning can be a useful indicator of problematic storm cells, but its absence does not imply a non-lethal convective storm. Additionally, storms sometimes yield dangerously high CG flash rates. These may be separate cells, or embedded in lines of storms. Locating them and issuing timely lightning warnings remain a unique challenge that the LMAs are only starting to address. Jeffrey Halverson is a Professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 1 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter    Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
FORT CARSON, Colo. (CBS4)  A dozen Fort Carson soldiers have been hospitalized after getting hit by lightning Wednesday afternoon. Doppler 4000 indicated at 2:45 p.m., when the strike happened, strong storms in the area of Butts Army Airfield where the soldiers were training. Five soldiers have been released and five others are being evaluated at Evans Hospital, which is on post at the base. Two others are at Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs, one of whom is in critical condition. First and foremost we want to give our condolences to the families of the soldiers affected, our hearts and prayers go out to them and we hope for a speedy recovery, Fort Carson spokesman Maj. Earl Brown said. Fort Carson officials said the soldiers were actually moving into a shelter when the lightning hit. Procedures are now being reevaluated.
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 3 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter    Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
FORT CARSON, Colo. (AP) - Twelve soldiers were injured, one critically, after lightning struck near them during a training exercise at Fort Carson. A base spokesman says six of the soldiers were still hospitalized Thursday and five were treated and released after Wednesday's strike. An engineering soldier was in critical condition. The soldiers were training with about 340 others when lightning struck Wednesday afternoon south of the Butts Army Airfield. Maj. Earl Brown said the National Weather Service issued a warning just minutes earlier, and the men were trying to get to shelter. They did not suffer a direct strike. The injured soldiers are from the U.S. Army's 555th Engineer Brigade stationed at Fort Carson. Their names were not released. (Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 12 of 12  19.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 6 of 12  70.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter  N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
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Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 9 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 7 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 8 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
SUMMIT COUNTY  A man was struck by lightning while hiking Saturday evening. According to the Summit County Sheriff's Office, around 5:00 p.m., an unidentified man was hiking near Amethyst Lake. He was struck by lightning and later transported to a local hospital in critical condition by medical helicopter. Police have not released the name of the man or the hospital he was transferred to. Amethyst Lake a day-long hike from Christmas Meadow, according to the Summit County Sheriff's Office. This strike comes roughly a week after 24- year-old Jesse King and his dog were struck and killed by lightning near Row Lake while on a fishing trip. King sought shelter under a tree, which was then struck by lighting. The NOAA recommends that when camping or hiking in an open area during a storm, folks should avoid open fields, stay away from tall isolated trees, camp in a valley or low ravine and to stay away from water and wet things and metal objects like poles or fences.
Wed, 07/31/2013 12:00 PM Injured Mark Endo  47.0  Kahului  
 HI 
  washing dishes inside    Doing the Dishes,Indirect,Indoors 
HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) - Even after Flossie weakened to a Tropical Depression, it still put on quite a light show over Maui, Molokai and Oahu before eventually fizzling away Monday night. "This was a very intense lightning storm so there was plenty of moisture out there. Whenever we get this thick, humid tropical air masses over us, if we get the right trigger  something to squeeze the atmosphere and lift it, like with Flossie  we're able to get these big thunderstorms," said Mike Cantin, Warning Coordination Meteorologist for the National Weather Service at the Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Flossie hit way too close to home for Uilani Endo and her daughter. "Just a boomthe biggest loudest boom noise you could ever imagine," explained Endo, as she described how lightning struck her Kahului home, shattering glass and ripping a hole in the bathroom roof. "All of a sudden, I saw a big white flash of lightning come into my room, ricocheting off my bathroom mirror and a big boom, and the whole house just shook," described Endo. Weather experts say lightning is typical with tropical storms, but Monday night's intense activity is rare for our area. "Hundreds and hundreds of strikes right over the top of the island and many of them touching the ground, so that's what made it most dangerous last night," explained Cantin. Officials say one of the most important things to remember during a thunderstorm is the 30/30 rule. If you see lightning and can't count to 30 before you hear thunder, go inside. Stay inside at least 30 minutes after the last clap of thunder you hear. But being indoors doesn't guarantee you won't get hurt, as Joslyn Minobe learned. "We would've never thought that opening your kitchen faucet would make you get a shock. I mean you're thinking, don't go walk outside because there's lightning  you're not thinking about what's going on in your house," said Minobe. Her 47-year-old husband, Mark, was struck by lightning inside their Haiku home while washing dishes. "When he turned the faucet on he received a shock that sent him to his knees. He saw blue sparks through the pipe," described Minobe over the phone. Experts say when lightning strikes it can also spread out and hit other objects nearby. "If you're inside a home you want to stay away from faucets, you don't want to be running water, you don't want to be in the shower, you don't want to be in the tub. Stay off the phone, because if lightning strikes nearby it can shock you through your phone  and stay away from windows. Stay away from the outside world," explained Cantin. If you can't get indoors, experts recommend you try getting into a vehicle. "A car with a hard top, not a soft-top convertible. The metal will actually translate the lightning around the vehicle and around you if you stay inside and stay safe," described Cantin. "If you're stuck outside, stay off the beach. You don't want to be the tallest thing. Lightning tends to strike the tallest object, so that's trees, poles, homes  and if you're out near the beach, an open area, you will be the tallest thing so your odds go up of being struck," explained Cantin.
Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 10 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
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Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 11 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  taking shelter   N/A  Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
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Wed, 07/31/2013 02:45 PM Injured soldier, 4 of 12  0.0  Fort Carson CO 
 USA 
  moving to shelter    Ground Strike,Military,Outside,Taking Shelter 
2 soldiers in hospital after Colo. lightning hit THE ASSOCIATED PRESS FORT CARSON, Colo. -- One soldier was in serious condition Thursday and another was in stable condition, but 10 others were released from the hospital after lightning struck near them during a training exercise, officials at Fort Carson said. The 12 soldiers had been in training but were heading toward shelter when the lightning struck Wednesday afternoon, Army officials said. Medics who were present for the training treated them until emergency responders arrived. Ten of the soldiers were released from the hospital Wednesday evening. The incident comes after 11 workers were struck by lightning July 18 at a northern Colorado farm. Two of the workers in the organic fields in Wellington were critically injured, and the nine others were also treated at hospitals. Wellington Fire Protection District Chief Gary Green has said the workers were preparing land for planting when a strong thunderstorm hit. Some of them were trying to reach shelter under a tractor, and others were heading for a vehicle when they were struck. The Denver office of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration was investigating. As of last week, 14 people have died from lightning strikes in the U.S. this year, according to the National Weather Service. The number of lightning fatalities in the country has held relatively steady the past three years, with 28 in 2012, 26 in 2011 and 29 in 2010. Many of the people who died this year were enjoying summertime activities like sightseeing, boating, camping and fishing, the weather service said. Last month, two people were killed near Jacob Lake, Ariz., while sitting beneath a rock wall at a scenic overlook that got hit by lightning. Others killed this year were under trees in Missouri and New York, fishing on a boat in Louisiana, walking on the beach in Florida, camping in California and at a park in Illinois. The weather service advises people to stay indoors for 30 minutes after the first flash of lightning or clap of thunder. Most lightning deaths occur between June and August when people are outdoors enjoying the warmer weather. Nearly two-thirds of the 238 people killed by lightning in the past seven years were enjoying recreational activities, according to a study by lightning safety specialist John Jensenius Jr. Read more here: http://www.struckbylightning.org/news/sbl20130208065732_lightning-hurts-12-soldiers-at.html.htm#storylink=cpy
Tue, 07/30/2013 12:00 PM Killed Lightning claims one, injures dozen   0.0  Dolakha  
 India 
       
DOLAKHA, JUL 30 - A woman died and around three dozen people were injured after lightning struck them at Bigu-7 in Dolakha district Monday night. The deceased has been identified as Pasang Doma Sherpa, 43, of Bigu-7. She died on the spot. The injured in the incident are Maya Thami and Devimaya Thami, among others. The injured are undergoing treatment at local health institutions, said Pasang Sherpa, a local. RSS Posted on: 2013-07-30 02:27
Tue, 07/30/2013 12:00 PM Injured Seven pupils struck by lightning in West Pokot  0.0  Kapenguria  
 Kenya 
       
a Kapenguria, Kenya: Seven pupils of Roponyo Primary School in Kapkoris area of West Pokot County have been treated and discharged from Kapenguria District Hospital after they were struck by lightning. 0 inShare The pupils, six girls and a boy, were struck by lightning amid heavy downpour on Monday evening as they prepared to go home. The hospital Medical Superintendent Dr Festus Omunyin said the pupils had been treated but the boy was yet to be discharged. Tens of families in North Pokot have also been displace by floods. The county National Drought Management Authority boss Mr Gabriel Mbogo asked residents to heed alerts on weather changes.
Tue, 07/30/2013 12:00 PM unknown Thor guard  0.0  Roseland NJ 
 USA 
  detection system    Prediction,Science 
ROSELAND - With the Thor Guardian Lightning Prediction System in use in several areas throughout the community, the Roseland Recreation Department is issuing guidelines for the users of recreational facilities during thunderstorms. The lightning prediction and warning systems detects atmospheric conditions that indicate a lightning strike is imminent - within a 10-15 minute time frame. Warning horns and/or a strobe light are located at Bond Force Park, Harrison Complex, Noecker School, and Tedesco Park. When lightning is detected, a single 15-second blast of the horn will be activated. When the danger of a lightning strike has passed, an all-clear signal of three, 5-second blasts of the horn will be sounded. Additionally, each horn cluster will be accompanied by a remote amber strobe light, which will remain activated until the all clear signal is sounded.  Anyone who hears the warning signal is required by the recreation department to seek shelter in a building (if available) or car, and remain in the shelter until the all-clear signal is activated. If no covered shelter is available, avoid open areas, water, tall trees, metal fences, overhead wires, power lines, elevated ground, cellular phone, and radios.  If the warning signal should occur a second time, all games and practices must be cancelled.
Tue, 07/30/2013 12:00 PM unknown Decades later, hair-raising photo still a reminder  0.0   
 USA 
  science    Education,Science 
The photo has been reprinted, posted and passed around for decades: Two grinning brothers, hair standing on end, unaware that they were minutes away from being struck by lightning while climbing Moro Rock in Californias Sequoia National Park. We were from San Diego and really stupid, says Michael McQuilken, who was a long-haired 18-year-old when the snapshot was taken on Aug. 20, 1975. His brother Sean was 12. We thought it was something funny. But now, nearly 38 years later, McQuilken says he recalls that deadly afternoon in the Sierra Nevada mountains vividly: The flash of white light as bright as arc welding, the deafening explosion, the feeling of becoming weightless and being lifted off the ground. Most of all, McQuilken says, he remembers the sheer power of a bolt from above. I never was cautious before that, says McQuilken, now 56. Now, if Im out to climb a peak, Im the first person to bail if clouds gather. The shocking experience attracted new interest this month when John Jensenius, the lightning safety specialist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, discovered McQuilkens blog post about the incident and shared it with a wide audience. Jensenius, who keeps track of the nations lightning deaths for NOAA, says hes been asked frequently about the photo, which was once used in brochures to help warn campers about the potential for danger. Contrary to rumors and some published reports, both brothers survived the strike, although another hiker was killed. There were 19 deaths reported in August 1975, in a year that saw a final toll of 91, Jensenius says. Back then, however, lightning deaths weren't well reported or tracked, he says, and the Moro Rock death wasn't included. Still, the photo serves as a gripping reminder of Jensenius' ongoing mission to help keep people safe from lightning, which has killed an average of 53 people a year over the past 30 years. Fewer deaths have been reported in recent years -- there were 28 in 2012 -- largely because of better awareness and prevention efforts. So far this summer, 14 people have been killed by lightning. Every death means there's room for improvement, Jensenius says. "If people would plan ahead, keep an eye on the sky and get to a safe place sooner, there could be many fewer deaths and injuries," he says. NBC News tracked McQuilken down at his San Diego home. Now a software engineer and a drummer, McQuilken says people email him about once a week asking about that hair-raising photo, which has seemed to develop of life of its own. Michael McQuilken Michael McQuilken's sister, Mary, 15, was also on Moro Rock on Aug. 20, 1975, although she escaped injury. It was taken by his 15-year-old sister, Mary, using an old Kodak Instamatic camera, McQuilken said. He and his siblings were hiking the granite dome. When they reached the top to enjoy the view, someone noticed that their hair was standing on end. At the time, we thought this was humorous, McQuilken recalled. I took a photo of Mary and Mary took a photo of Sean and me. I raised my right hand into the air and the ring I had on began to buzz so loudly that everyone could hear it. Not once did they consider that a lightning strike was imminent, he said. Suddenly, the temperature dropped dramatically and it began to hail. The teens decided to return back down the mountain, but partway down, the bolt struck. I found myself on the ground with the others, McQuilken recalled. Sean was collapsed and huddled on his knees. Smoke was pouring from his back. It turned out that Sean was one of at least three people hit directly that day by the triple-pronged bolt, including one man who died and another who sued the U.S. government for not warning about lightning danger, Jensenius noted. The lawsuit was dismissed. Sean was knocked unconscious and suffered third-degree burns to his back and elbows. Although the kids didn't know it then, hair standing on end and tingling skin may be signs that a lightning strike may be imminent, experts say. If that happens, the best advice is to seek shelter immediately. If that's not possible, squat low to the ground on the balls of your feet, making yourself the smallest target possible and minimize contact with the ground. Then, as soon as possible, get out of the area. After the strike, McQuilken and his family stayed in contact with local rangers and sent them slides of the now-famous photos. Years later, his sister surprised him with a calendar that included a pirated copy of the picture. That whole experience just feels like it happened yesterday, says McQuilken, who lost his brother Sean to suicide in 1989. He still spends a lot of time outdoors, but McQuilken takes no chances with lightning. He has been known to caution other hikers when it's too dangerous to climb, but it's clear that, like those boys on the mountain, they, too, think their chance of injury is remote. Ive told them, 'This is not safe,'" McQuilken says. "But they seem to take what I say very lightly. Health news lightning
Sun, 07/28/2013 10:00 PM Injured person in home  0.0  Vineland NJ 
 USA 
  inside house     Indirect,Indoors 
VINELAND  Two city homes were damaged by lightning strikes Sunday night, according to Vineland fire officials. One resident was taken to the hospital with injuries that appeared to be caused by the strike. Firefighters were called out to a home on the 200 block of East Sherman Avenue just before 10:20 p.m. for the first strike. According to Vineland Fire Chief Robert Pagnini, lightning struck a satellite dish outside the home and "chased" the cables into the house. CONNECT WITH US! " FACEBOOK " TWITTER " S.J. NEWSFLASH " NJ.COM/SOUTH Firefighters encountered light smoke in the basement that has been attributed to the satellite dish wires being melted by the electricity surge, Pagnini said. There was no actual fire reported at the scene. A man who was inside the house was taken to Inspira Medical Center Vineland to get treatment for a foot injury. Pagnini said that while the injury appears to linked to the strike, the man was not directly hit by the lightning. The smoke was under control by 11:15 p.m. Just three minutes after the fire department was dispatched to the first lightning strike, another was called in at a home on the 3700 block of Italia Avenue. Pagnini said a chimney sustained some damage after being hit by lightning, but no smoke or fire was reported. No one was injured and the incident was under control before 11:10 p.m.
Sun, 07/28/2013 08:25 PM Injured clerk  25.0  Century FL 
 USA 
  inside at cash register    Indirect,Indoors,Work 
A Century store clerk received a shock at work Sunday evening when the store was struck by lightning. The clerk at the Dollar General on North Century Boulevard reported she received a shock from the cash register when lightning hit the store about 8:25 p.m. The 25-year old female was not seriously injured. She was transported by Escambia County EMS to Jay Hospital for evaluation. There was no significant damage reported to the store. Comments
Sun, 07/28/2013 12:00 PM Injured woman on boat  0.0  Caloosahatchee river FL 
 USA 
  on a boat  N/A  Boat,Indirect,On Water,Outside,Water 
Jewell Cartales LEE COUNTY, FL - For the first time we are hearing from the woman shocked by lightning yesterday while on a boat on the Caloosahatchee River. Twenty-four hours later, Jewell Cartales remains in the hospital. A half hour from her Cape Coral home, out on the Caloosahatchee River near Shell Point, Cartales watched the storms forming in the distance. "On my way out to get the towels, I was closing the hatches," she said. On the way home from a sunny day on Captiva, she was preparing her family's new boat for the upcoming rain. "I was sticking the screen back in. I had just finished latching it. I saw the lightning, heard the thunder and got, like, electrocuted," she said. She felt a jolt go through her entire body. "It hit my hand like when you touch an electrical thing. It shocked me. All I could think of was getting to my kids," she said. Instead, she passed out. The Iona-McGregor Fire Department tells us lightning hit the water near the boat. It wasn't a direct hit, but an electrical charge that shocked her. There were six people and three dogs on the 37-foot boat. No one else was injured. Cartales was taken by ambulance to HealthPark Hospital. At first the mother of four says her heart was pounding, her body shaking -- and she couldn't walk or move her arm. Twenty-four hours later she's mostly back to normal. "I am going to look at lightning different, I am sure," Cartales said. Cartales says this won't stop her from going out on the water; instead, she'll keep a closer watch on the dark skies ahead. "Soon as you see lightning we get out, but that could be too late. That first lightning could be the one that hits you," she said. Cartales says she'll remain in the hospital one more night while the doctor monitors her heart. There was no damage to the boat...except the radio. Florida Fish and Wildlife are not investigating any further. CAPE CORAL, Fla. - Sergeant Matt Nyce with Lee County Sheriff's Office Marine Unit knows firsthand how dangerous it can be to be on the water during a storm. Between his experience with the U.S. Coast Guard, the Sheriff's Office Marine Unit, and his passion for the water, he's been on three boats that have been struck by lightning. "Each one is just as scary as the last one," Nyce said. Lightning nearly struck a woman on a boat in the Caloosahatchee River yesterday. According to the incident report, EMS crews provided advanced life support to her on scene. Now, marine officials are reminding boaters about safety during storms. Nyce said even though water isn't typically a good conductor or electricity, salt water is and poses greater risk for those out on the water during a storm. "If you get a nearby strike in the civinity of your boat, you could very well get some residual effects from that bolt of lightning," Nyce said. Patrick O'Brien, president of Sea Tow, said he's been busier this summer rescuing distraught boats because of all the recent storms. If you get caught on the water during a storm, find a dock or marina as quickly as possible. Boaters can legally go through idle zones at non-idle speeds only when a storm is present. Nyce said the best way to aviod getting caught in a stormy situation entirely is to plan ahead and know what the weather forecast is before you head out. "If you see these things start to build up, it's time to go home... don't wait until they get up on you because it's too late at that point," he said. Here's a link to the Lee County Waterways app, which tracks radar and weather conditions for area waters: http://www.leegov.com/Pages/GoMobile.aspx
Sat, 07/27/2013 12:00 PM Injured Heather Scott  24.0  Hitchcock Creek NC 
 USA 
  tubing down a river  N/A  Boat,Fresh Water,On Water,Outside,Tubing,Water 
Woman struck by lightning while tubing Hitchcock Creek by Dawn M. Kurry Richmond County Daily Journal Aug 03, 2013 | 766 views | 0 | 7 | | Scott A sunny afternoon of tubing last weekend suddenly became a nightmare for a group of friends after dark clouds gathered over Hitchcock Creek. Heather Scott, 24, of Hamlet, was headed down the river behind her husband, leaning her left side into the water to avoid the water he was splashing behind him as he tried to paddle faster to get out of the storm. Suddenly, the group heard a loud crack of thunder, and Scott said she felt an indescribable sensation shoot from her left shoulder down into her left foot. I felt a crazy tingling, said Scott. I cant even explain the feeling. Next thing I know, I cant move my left side and thats when the people I was with pulled me out of the water. Scott had been struck by lightning. My husband and another person pulled me out and we waited on the bank for rescue workers to get to us, said Scott, recalling waiting in the woods for an hour, scared. Rockingham Police Department and EMS got there on foot and had to carry me out on a gurney. They carried me to an open field on a gator to get me to the ambulance. Scott, whose left side was tingling, then growing numb, then tingling again, was panicking. I was really freaking out. I was scared, she said. I didnt know what would happen to me. I was always told about lighting but I never thought I would feel it like that. Scott said she didnt stand on her legs until she got to the hospital two hours after being struck. It felt like when you get up and your foot is asleep, she said. The doctor told her she was lucky that she had been in the water, and that the lightning wasnt grounded, or she would have had lasting impressions on her skin; a tell-tale mark of being struck by lightning. Its something Ill never forget, she said. It hasnt even been a week and I keep going back to it. I can remember everything. We are just blessed and very lucky it wasnt worse. I take a lot of things for granted but Im looking at things differently now. Scott said everyone in the tubing group felt the lightning in some way, but she was the only one impacted by the strike.  Staff Writer Dawn M. Kurry can be reached at 910-997-3111, ext. 15, or by email at dkurry@civitasmedia.com. Read more: Richmond County Daily Journal - Woman struck by lightning while tubing Hitchcock Creek Aug. 08--A sunny afternoon of tubing last weekend suddenly became a nightmare for a group of friends after dark clouds gathered over Hitchcock Creek. Heather Scott, 24, of Hamlet, was headed down the river behind her husband, leaning her left side into the water to avoid the water he was splashing behind him as he tried to paddle faster to get out of the storm. Suddenly, the group heard a loud crack of thunder, and Scott said she felt an indescribable sensation shoot from her left shoulder down into her left foot. "I felt a crazy tingling," said Scott. "I can't even explain the feeling. Next thing I know, I can't move my left side and that's when the people I was with pulled me out of the water." Scott had been struck by lightning. "My husband and another person pulled me out and we waited on the bank for rescue workers to get to us," said Scott, recalling waiting in the woods for an hour, scared. "Rockingham Police Department and EMS got there on foot and had to carry me out on a gurney. They carried me to an open field on a gator to get me to the ambulance." Scott, whose left side was tingling, then growing numb, then tingling again, was panicking. "I was really freaking out. I was scared," she said. "I didn't know what would happen to me. I was always told about lighting but I never thought I would feel it like that." Scott said she didn't stand on her legs until she got to the hospital two hours after being struck. "It felt like when you get up and your foot is asleep," she said. The doctor told her she was lucky that she had been in the water, and that the lightning wasn't grounded, or she would have had lasting impressions on her skin; a tell-tale mark of being struck by lightning. "It's something I'll never forget," she said. "It hasn't even been a week and I keep going back to it. I can remember everything. We are just blessed and very lucky it wasn't worse. I take a lot of things for granted but I'm looking at things differently now." Scott said everyone in the tubing group felt the lightning in some way, but she was the only one impacted by the strike. -- Staff Writer Dawn M. Kurry can be reached at 910-997-3111, ext. 15, or by email at dkurry@civitasmedia.com. Copyright 2013 - Richmond County Daily Journal, Rockingham, N.C.
Sat, 07/27/2013 12:00 PM Injured 4 hiking  0.0  Mjolvafjell peak Trondheim 
 Norway 
  hiking    Hiking,Outside 
Four survive lightning strike Published: 29 Jul 2013 11:47 GMT+02:00 | Print version Updated: 29 Jul 2013 11:47 GMT+02:00 Share on reddit More Sharing Services Four people were hit by lightning on Saturday as they were hiking on Mjølvafjell peak in Romsdal, south of Trondheim. The four were evacuated by helicopter and are now being treated in Ålesund hospital. "We have been incredibly lucky," Geir Kvam, 55, told Norway's VG newspaper. "I think that if we had been just a few yards closer to the top, we would have died." Kvam was walking with his daughter, a friend and his friend's son. He and his friend were both seriously injured, while the children were largely unharmed. "The doctors have learned that my condition is worse than first thought. Electricity passed through my heart, so I need to be in hospital for one more night," he told the paper.
Fri, 07/26/2013 07:30 PM Injured woman   28.0  Mount Shasta CA 
 USA 
  touching metal railing  N/A  Indirect,Metal,Metal Railing,Outside 
Woman injured by Mount Shasta lightning strike One person was injured and a tree was struck Friday evening, July 26 when a series of lightning strikes touched down in Mount Shasta. 0 This lightning strike was captured by David Plank. The photo was taken from Montague looking towards Fort Jones. By Skye Kinkade Posted Jul. 27, 2013 @ 1:21 pm One person was injured and a tree was struck Friday evening, July 26, when a series of lightning strikes touched down in Mount Shasta. A 28 year old Mount Shasta woman was injured when electricity from a strike was conducted through a metal railing at an apartment building, said Mount Shasta Police Department chief Parish Cross. The woman was leaning against a railing at 700 Pine Street at about 7:30 p.m. when the incident occurred, Cross said. She was taken to Mercy Medical Center Mt. Shasta for treatment of injuries. At about the same time, a tree was struck on Marjorie Street, between Alta Vista Manor's parking lot and the street, according to the Mount Shasta Police Department. The tree, which was about 35 to 40 feet tall, was split in half by the bolt and had to be cut down by the Mount Shasta Fire Department for safety purposes. Northern California took about 1,400 lightning strikes, with about half of them happening in Siskiyou County, according to the US Forest Service, lighting several small fires on the Shasta Trinity National Forest and the Klamath National Forest. According to the Forest Service's online incident information database, the 11 fires on the Shasta Trinity total about 10 acres. Many have been extinguished. Smokejumpers and crews on scene, at a three to four acre fire on Girard Ridge in the Mt. Shasta/McCloud Management Unit, with engines working their way in. Lana Costenza, who was working at Mt. Shasta Tire Factory on N. Mt. Shasta Blvd. said at one point on Friday evening, a bolt struck somewhere out in front of the store near the parked car her daughter, Erin Beauchene, was sitting in. The strike rattled the entire building and shook the ground, she said. She described it as "a bright white light, like I was seeing the end of the tunnel," she said. The storm also brought something more welcome: a double rainbow stretched across the Mt. Shasta area. Photos of the rainbow, lightening and thunderclouds, contributed by our readers, can be found at our Facebook page at this link. Read more: http://www.mtshastanews.com/article/20130727/NEWS/130729810/1001/NEWS#ixzz2aQuYHTx4
Thu, 07/25/2013 12:00 PM unknown Lucky amateur stargazer becomes the first person e  0.0   
 UK 
  science    Education,Science 
Lucky amateur stargazer becomes the first person ever to snap a rare lightning strike into space above Britain Sprites - shards of light caused by large electrical discharges high above thunderstorm clouds - have never before been recorded in the UK Amateur photographer Richard Kacerek took the photo of the sprite on Tuesday night in East Yorkshire One expert has confirmed the sighting is a rare example of sprites that can occur over the North Sea By SARAH GRIFFITHS PUBLISHED: 06:52 EST, 25 July 2013 | UPDATED: 06:56 EST, 25 July 2013 0 View comments An amateur astronomer has become the first person to capture a massive lightning strike 'into space' above the British Isles. The atmospheric phenomena, known as sprites, had never been recorded in the UK before an amateur astronomer in East Yorkshire managed to take the photographic first. Richard Kacerek, 33, spotted the sprite - caused by an upward lightning discharge five miles east of Hull - and has sparked excitement in the scientific community with his image. An amateur astronomer has become the first person to capture a massive lightning strike 'into space' (pictured) above the British Isles. The atmospheric phenomena, known as sprites, had never been recorded in the UK before Sprites are shards of light caused by large-scale electrical discharges that take place high above thunderstorm clouds. They cause a varied range of visual shapes in the night sky but have never been recorded before in the UK. Mr Kacerek spotted the sprite on Tuesday night from a camera set up in Hull. More... The incredible photographs that create the illusion that a plane is flying to the MOON SNOW on Mars is the most likely reason for the valleys that exist there - and could shed new light on the red planet's early climate He said: 'Astronomy is my hobby, I am not a scientist so I am delighted to have captured the sprite, it was such an interesting event. 'They are a fascinating phenomena as they happen in the atmosphere above the storm clouds. 'They are relatively unknown and it looked a little special so I sent it to Dr Martin Fullekrug at Bath University and he said it was the first spotted over the UK. 'I think luck had a lot to do with it.' Mr Kacerek spotted the sprite on a camera that is part of the UK Meteor Observing Network, which amateur stargazers can use to observe space. Richard Kacerek spotted the sprite, caused by an upward lightning discharge five miles east of Hull. His photograph has sparked excitement in the scientific community Dr Fullekrug, an expert in the electrodynamic properties of the atmosphere at the University of Bath, has carried out a number of studies on sprites. He said: 'This particular sprite is a rare example of sprites that can occur over the North Sea. 'The lightning flash inside the thunderstorm, which caused the sprite above the cloud was also unique.' The UK Met Office recorded the thunderstorm using the ATDnet lightning detection network, which is ordinarily used for real-time forecasts of flash floods, hail, and wind gusts often associated with thunderstorms. Graeme Anderson, foundation scientist for the UK Met Office, said: 'The ATDnet lightning location system operated by the Met Office picked up widespread and particularly intense storms across the UK during Tuesday 23 July. 'The storms detected in the region near Hull developed around the wash before moving northwards, but were of only moderate intensity and were small compared with some other storms that occurred on that day in other areas.' The first colour image of a sprite was captured as part of a 1994 NASA/University of Alaska aircraft campaign to study the rare lightning strikes. The red color was found to be from nitrogen fluorescent emissions excited by a lightning stroke in the underlying thunderstorm Alec Bennett, who develops lightning detectors for BIRAL, a Bristol-based company, predicted sprites would occur during thunderstorms approaching the UK from the Atlantic with his electrical sensors. He said Mr Kacerek was very fortunate to catch this extremely rare phenomenon on camera. Dr Fullekrug said: 'Citizen scientists can play a major role in unravelling the mysteries of lightning into space. 'It is well known that upward lightning is a necessary condition to initiate lightning into space, but upward lightning alone is not sufficient. 'There are yet unknown factors which will be investigated in more detail during two upcoming space missions due to be carried out by the French and European Space Agency in 2015. 'Citizen scientists can make a major contribution by reporting sprite occurrence times.' WHAT ARE SPRITES? Sprites are large-scale electrical discharges that occur high above thunderstorm clouds They give rise to a varied range of visual shapes flickering in the night sky Sprites are triggered by the discharges of positive lightning between an underlying thundercloud and the ground They appear as luminous reddish-orange flashes - they often have bluish hanging tendrils and can be preceded by a red halo Researchers have categorized certain sprites as carrot shaped, a column and a jellyfish- which is the largest type measuring up to 30 miles in diameter They often occur in clusters at between 50 and 90 kilometres above the Earth's surface Sprites were first photographed on 6 July 1989 by scientists from the University of Minnesota Since their 1989 discovery, they have been photographed thousands of times from the ground, air and space - but until now, never before above the UK Sprites have erroneously been held responsible for otherwise unexplained accidents involving high altitude vehicular operations above thunderstorms Sprites are shards of light are caused by large-scale electrical discharges which take place high above thunderstorm clouds (pictured). They cause a varied range of visual shapes in the night sky but had never been recorded before in the UK Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2377638/Lucky-amateur-stargazer-person-snap-rare-lightning-strike-SPACE-Britain.html#ixzz2aiW99x5H Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Thu, 07/25/2013 12:00 PM Injured man golfing  70.0  Prescott AZ 
 USA 
  golfing    Cardiac Arrest,Direct hit,Golf Course,Outside 
Man struck by lightning in Prescott comes back to life Share on twitterShare on gmailShare on stumbleuponShare on emailShare on printMore Sharing Services 0 Posted: Jul 25, 2013 11:04 PM EDT Updated: Jul 25, 2013 11:04 PM EDT WEATHER NEWS Days later, monsoon cleanup drags on One inch of rain in one hour causes Flagstaff flooding Man struck by lightning in Prescott comes back to life PRESCOTT, Ariz. - A man in his 70s, who was golfing at a Prescott golf course Thursday night, was struck by lightning and almost died. According to the Chino Valley Fire Department, the bolt tore his clothing. He was unresponsive and had no heartbeat when paramedics arrived. Witnesses say the lightning struck him in the head. He suffered burns to his face and chest. The man was transported to Yavapai Regional Medical Center. After receiving CPR, he regained a pulse and was alert and talking.
Thu, 07/25/2013 12:00 AM Injured Ray Row  75.0  Prescott AZ 
 USA 
  golfing  N/A  Cardiac Arrest,CPR,Golf Course,Outside 
(PRESCOTT, Ariz.) -- An Arizona man had to be resuscitated after being struck by lightning during a golf game on Thursday. According to the Prescott Daily Courier, 75-year-old Ray Row was on his 18th hole at the Antelope Hills Golf Course in Prescott, Ariz., when he was hit by lightning. When Row wasnt responsive, two nearby golfing partners started CPR and called for help. He was not breathing and had no pulse, Rob Zazueta of the Chino Valley Fire District told the Prescott Daily Courier. We got a pulse right before he was loaded on the gurney. Row is reportedly in stable condition at the Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott, Ariz. Row was struck by lightning just three days after a married couple were killed by a lighting strike at the LeFevre Scenic Outlook in Fredonia, Arizona. A teenage boy was also injured in that lightning strike. Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio WEATHER NEWS Checking in with golfer who survived lightning strike Before firefighters' deaths, weather model showed shifting winds Being outdoors perilous during thunderstorms PRESCOTT VALLEY, Ariz. - Less than two weeks ago, a 76-year-old man was struck by lightning on a golf course in Prescott Valley. He spent a few days in the hospital, and today, returned to the links. Roy Row was incredibly lucky. The only issues he suffered as a result of that jolt were some issues with his hands and a ruptured ear drum. 76-year-old Roy Row has been golfing for years. And although he may not be the best golfer -- it's a pass time he loves. And a pastime that almost cost him his life. "I don't know if I was walking or standing or what -- but everything tuned black." Two weeks ago -- a quick moving storm moved in while he was golfing at Antelope Hills Golf Course and he was struck by lightning. "We thought maybe he was joking at first and Dave starts going 'Roy, Roy' but of course Roy's not moving," says Dick Nichols, a friend of Roy. The hat he was wearing at the time was blown to pieces. "We rolled him over and you don't really want to know what he looked like -- he didn't look good," says Dave Hegelson, friend. "We just started CPR on him." Roy says he's been playing golf for these two buddies for years and he credits those two guys with saving his life after his heart stopped -- they performed CPR. "Without them I wouldn't be standing here. No question," says Roy. He spent a few nights in the hospital and now, just two weeks after he was struck, he's making his triumphant return to the golf course. "At this point, it's just good to be out here. It's marvelous -- you just can't imagine how good it is to be standing up on this side of the grass, that's just a phenomenal thing." Roy says he now has a new lease on life. "It is just a wonderful feeling to be alive -- I've got life to live now." Related story: Man struck by lightning in Prescott comes back to life Lightning response saves a life Heidi Dahms Foster/Review Chino Valley Firefighter/paramedics Doug Copenhaver, Terry Jacobson and Rob Zazueta stand with Roy and Ginny Row. Firefighters, along with two of Rows friends, saved his life when he was struck by lightning on July 25 during a storm at the Antelope Hills Golf Course. Heidi Dahms-Foster Editorial Manager Roy Row is appreciating life a little more than the average person these days. That's because he nearly lost his after lightning struck him on July 25 while he was playing a round at Antelope Hills Golf Course. Row and his wife, Ginny, visited Saturday with the Chino Valley Fire District crew that helped save his life, including Firefighter/paramedics Doug Copenhaver, Terry Jacobson, and Rob Zazueta. The three were manning the Prescott Fire station at the airport, assisting Prescott after the department was devastated by the loss of the Granite Mountain Hotshots in the Yarnell Hill Fire June 30. Row said he regularly golfs with a group of friends. Just two weeks before he was struck, he observed a storm, and felt uncomfortable enough to leave. On July 25, the men engaged in a "typical lousy game, but we were having a good time," he said. "We had finished 17, and we were on hole 18, near the intersection of Willow Creek Road and Highway 89, when this massive dark cloud came almost over the course. As we teed off on 18, I saw this one bolt of lightning over Glassford Hill. I told the guys, 'Gee, I think things are getting dangerous here,' Row said. But they decided to play through because they were so close to finishing. Ironically, the four joked as they traveled the fairway. "Dave (Helgeson) says, 'I wonder, do you supposed you feel a lightning strike before it hits?' We jawed about this down the fairway," Row said. "When I saw Dave in the hospital I said, 'I've got the answer for you!'" In fact, Row said he had no inkling he was about to be hit. "Dave and Dick were across the fairway under the trees and Craig was about 30 feet away in the other direction," he said. "When the lightning hit me I had just looked back at Craig and he was putting his clubs away. He says at the time it occurred, he felt a tingling on his head, and ducked. When he looked up I was on the ground, and so were Dave and Dick, but they were getting up." Row said his friends thought he was pretending to be unconscious. "Dave and Dick hollered at me to get up. I didn't move and they hollered again and came over. Dave's description of my condition was, 'Well, you really don't want to know,'" he said. While his friends began chest compressions and called 911, the Mayer Fire crew had been listening to the radio crackle inside the station as the massive storm moved over the course and lightning began to strike. When the station's printer began to spit out paper, signifying a call, said Jacobsen, it was right after a big strike. That's when Zazueta said, "I bet you a golfer has been struck by lightning." Seconds later the radio dispatched them to a lightning strike. Another one of the small miracles of the day occurred that morning. A man stopped in and asked for directions to the clubhouse. Zazueta had to get the map out and direct him, and that's how, while manning an unfamiliar station, they were able to get to Row within four minutes. "We were right around the corner," Zazueta said. "Everything went right that day that needed to go right." When the crew arrived at the scene, they found Row not breathing and without a pulse. They put a monitor on him, placed defibrillator pads on his chest, and prepared to start IVs. The Lifeline Ambulance supervisor told them, "We may need to shock him." That's when, in the driving rain and as the firefighters tried to shield his body from hailstones, Jacobsen looked down and saw Row take a gulping breath. Then he felt a slow pulse that became stronger by the minute. Seeing Row return to life is, in 13 years, "definitely one of my top calls," Jacobsen said. The next thing Row remembers is Zazueta asking him to roll sideways so firefighters could remove the body board from under him at the hospital. His wife went to Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott and found him "laying on a table and covered with I don't know how many blankets. He was just shaking all over." That was a good sign, she said, he was alive. Row suffered a ruptured eardrum, some minor burns on his body, and some inflammation of his eyelids and eye membranes. He said he's still pretty weak and wants to sleep a lot, but his voice, and his grip, are strong. He said he owes it all to God. "He wanted me around for some reason. I was blessed with these (firefighters) and Dave and Dick's talents to save me," he said. Zazueta said the events of the entire day were "of a higher nature." He said the crew had spent much of the day talking for the first time among themselves since their colleagues died in the Yarnell Hill fire. "The whole day was a mending process for us as a crew. We were meant to be there," he said. Row said he always has appreciated firefighters, but his admiration has increased exponentially. "This (event) brings it home in a very critical way," he said.
Wed, 07/24/2013 12:00 PM Injured Deborah Kendall  33.0   
 UK 
  saved by rubber boots ????    Outside 
Deborah Kendall believes her lucky escape was due to the fact she had been wearing her husband's wellingtons at the time Photo: Raymonds By Agencies 8:55AM BST 24 Jul 2013 Deborah Kendall, 33, was hit by the lightning bolt as she put her two-year-old daughter in her car but escaped with only pins and needles and cramp. The mother, who was struck by several million volts, told how doctors who treated her said it may have been because she was wearing her husband's rubber-soled wellies at the time. Mrs Kendall put her wellies on before stepping outside with an umbrella to shelter husband David, 36, as he carried their two-year-old daughter to their car. She said: "We needed to get going, and it was absolutely pouring with rain. "I only had little pumps on, so David said I should put his wellies on as my feet would get soaked otherwise.
Wed, 07/24/2013 12:00 PM Injured by, 3 of 3 @ grand canyon  0.0  LeFevre Overlook AZ 
 USA 
  at a rest stop    Grand Canyon,Outside 
WEATHER NEWS 2 killed after lightning hits Arizona scenic overlook Looking into Arizona's Stupid Motorist Law Flooding follows heavy rain in parts of Flagstaff FREDONIA, Ariz. - Two people were killed in northern Arizona after being struck by lightning Tuesday at about 3 p.m. Authorities say a man and woman were in the area of the LeFevre Scenic Overlook on Highway 89A, about eight miles north of Jacobs Lake, not far from Fredonia. The man and woman were in a group of people at the overlook and were pronounced dead at the scene. A teenage boy was also struck by lightning and knocked to the ground. He was treated for non-life threatening injuries. He is not associated with the victims. The names of the man and woman who died are being withheld until relatives can be notified. According to Coconino County Sheriff's officials, the victims lived outside the United States and were a couple, but their hometowns and ages weren't immediately available.
Wed, 07/24/2013 03:00 PM Killed Ratchaya Tantranon, 2 of 3 @ grand canyon  20.0  LeFevre Overlook AZ 
 USA 
  at a rest stop  N/A  Grand Canyon,Outside 
FREDONIA, Ariz. -- Two adults were killed and a child was injured by lightning at a scenic overlook on Highway 89A Tuesday afternoon. A bolt of lightning struck in the area of the LeFevre Overlook about eight miles north of Jacob Lake around 3 p.m., according to the Coconino County Sheriff's Office. A group of people was standing in the area when the husband and wife were struck. They were later pronounced dead at the scene. A boy also was struck by the lightning and knocked to the ground. He was treated at the scene for non-life-threatening injuries then transported to an area hospital. Sheriff's spokesman Gerry Blair said the child was not associated with the two other victims and was traveling with several adults. The two deceased victims were transported to the Coconino County Medical Examiner's Office in Flagstaff. The couple's names have not been released at this time. Blair said they were from out of the country.

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